Call for Papers: 2nd Biennial Conference on Race + IP: Exclusions, Engagements, Empowerment

Deadline: 
09/30/18
Event Date: 
04/5/19 to 04/6/19
Location name: 
New York City
Organization: 
NYU Law

Overview

  • Proposal Deadline:  September 30, 2018
  • Submit Materials to:  Emily Rogers, er2359@nyu.edu
    • For paper proposals, please send a short abstract (~300 words) and 2-3 page CV.
    • For roundtable proposals, please send a description of the session’s topic, each participant’s contribution (~500 words total), and 2-3 page CVs for each participant.
  • Inquiries to Co-Organizers:

Details

Intellectual property (IP) is an increasingly important site of social, political and economic struggle. An emerging body of scholarship has begun to consider how IP reflects and reinforces inequalities along lines of race, gender, sexual orientation, class and disability. Drawing on critical race theory and critical legal theory, this scholarship is asking integral questions about the hidden racialized categories that inform law, legal decision-making, and policy making within the context of IP law.

This conference will bring together a unique set of speakers whose work is dedicated to unraveling how knowledge production regimes contribute to local and global economic inequality as well as facilitate the ongoing dispossession of marginalized populations. In our current political environment, it is important to initiate new conversations about legal sites of inequality and injustice. This conference seeks to focus on the embedded practices of colonialism and racism that not only inform the creation of this body of law, but that are disguised and hidden in its ongoing operation especially through the social and cultural privileges that it generates for specific populations.

Confirmed Keynote Speakers

  • Rebecca Tsosie, University of Arizona, Professor of Law
    Areas of expertise: tribal self-determination within the US constitutional framework, environmental justice for tribal communities, and intellectual property rights for cultural resources.
  • Chidi Oguamanam, University of Ottowa, Professor of Law
    Areas of expertise: global knowledge governance, IP, and technology law—with an emphasis on biodiversity and biotechnology, including agricultural biotechnology.

We welcome proposals for traditional papers and pre-constituted roundtable sessions on these and other related themes:

  • Power, cultural property, and ownership
  • Race, genetic research, and IP
  • Indigenous exclusions, engagements and appropriations of IP law
  • Racial and gender inequality in IP economies
  • Sites of new IP sovereignties
  • Race and inequality in global IP governance
  • IP and the development of criminal justice technologies
  • Disability and IP