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Call for Papers: Legal and Ethical Issues in Predictive Data Analytics 

RESEARCH COLLOQUIUM: CALL FOR PAPERS LEGAL AND ETHICAL ISSUES IN PREDICTIVE DATA ANALYTICS

June 19 & 20, 2014
Blacksburg, Va.
Abstract Submission Deadline: March 3, 2014

A research colloquium, “Legal and Ethical Issues in Predictive Data Analytics,” hosted by Professor Janine Hiller of Virginia Tech and co-organized by Professor Tonia Hap Murphy of the University of Notre Dame, is sponsored by the Center for Business Intelligence and Analytics in the Pamplin College of Business, Virginia Tech. Topics include privacy and data security and consumer protection: price discrimination, targeting.

Up to four invitations for research presentation slots will be extended based on this call for papers. In order to receive consideration, researchers are invited to submit an abstract by March 3, 2014.

TOPIC:

Various terms are used to describe the collection and use of data for decision-making. Big data and data mining are two common terms that indicate the breadth and depth of data sets and the subsequent use of that data to extract new meaning. Used here, data analytics references a mathematical process that can discover trends, connections, and relationships that may then feed into various models and processes. Furthermore, analytics implies that data is used to make decisions that affect individuals or businesses based on the result of algorithmic-derived predictions.

Legal scholarship related to the use of data analytics and its predictive application is sparse, yet there are important questions that call for discussion. For example, a recurrent legal issue in data management is the question of privacy rights and obligations for securing information. Particular statutes protect health, financial, and children’s information to a certain extent. Without a doubt, data analytics impacts privacy concerns more intensely and in new ways; the meaning of individual privacy is challenged in an environment where new personal insights are algorithmically “discovered” because of widely aggregated data and analytic techniques. Zarsky describes the different types of data analysis and predictive modeling in setting the background for a proposed transparency taxonomy for predictive analytics. More broadly, Balkan notes that, “data mining technologies allow the state and business enterprises to record perfectly innocent behavior that no one is particularly ashamed of and draw surprisingly powerful inferences about people's behavior, beliefs, and attitudes.”

As sophisticated data analysis and its predictive application becomes ubiquitous, what are the legal and ethical considerations for society, business and government? What laws protect individuals and corporations from data overreach and predictive applications? What laws should be modified in order to reap the benefits of data analytics and predictive modeling? What areas of commerce are most impacted? How are these questions being addressed by different legal structures? Beyond legal questions, what ethical questions and frameworks are important for the use of predictive analytics?

This colloquium seeks to promote research on the legal and ethical issues presented by the predictive use of analytics in society, emphasizing uses by business entities.

Issues of interest include, but are not limited to, the following categories that are relevant to the discussion of data analysis, predictive modeling, and decision-making processes:

Privacy and data security

Consumer protection: price discrimination, targeting

Employment decisions and analytics

Corporate governance: decision-making, risk management, and oversight

Health analytics and ethics

Insurance: benefits, prices, structures

Intellectual property: data and analytic ownership, trade secret protection

Legal system: due process, e-discovery, evidentiary issues

Antitrust: collusion and data

International legal comparisons

Ethical use of predictive data analytics in commerce

National security: inferences, actions, and automation derived from data

Submissions: To be considered, please submit an abstract of up to 750 words to Janine Hiller at jhiller@vt.edu, and copied to tmurphy1@nd.edu by March 3, 2014. Abstracts will be evaluated based upon the quality of the abstract and the topic’s fit with other presentations. Questions may be directed to Janine Hiller at jhiller@vt.edu or Tonia Hap Murphy at tmurphy1@nd.edu.

Those submitting abstracts will be informed of the outcome by March 17, 2014. If accepted, the author agrees to submit a discussion paper of 7,500 to 10,000 words by June 2, 2014. Formatting will be either APA or Bluebook. The paper need not be in final form; however, it should be complete enough to benefit from and elicit discussion at the colloquium. In the case of papers with multiple authors, only one author may attend and present at the colloquium.

The organizers are negotiating publication options for colloquium papers, with the goal of producing a scholarly book or special journal issue. While a final decision is pending, we are firmly optimistic about an ultimate publication. Authors agree to submit their final papers to be edited for inclusion in such a future publication. It is anticipated that final submissions and editing will occur in the fall of 2014.

From Consumer Law & Policy Blog
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Call for Papers: Vulnerability, Resilience, and Public Responsibility for Social and Economic Justice 

The German Society of International Law (Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationales Recht - DGIR) in cooperation with the Working Group of Young Scholars in Public International Law (Arbeitskreis junger Völkerrechtswissenschaftler/-innen - AjV) will be hosting a joint conference on Proportionality in International Law

The conference will take place at the Georg-August-University in Göttingen from the 12th until the 13th of September 2014.

The principle of proportionality is an integral part of several areas of Public International Law, which can be illustrated inter alia by the following questions: Which role does proportionality play when military advantages are being assessed compared to the death of civilians? How can international watercourses be used in an equitable and reasonable manner? To what extent can trade restrictions be balanced against environmental protection? Even though proportionality is a widely accepted principle, a lot of controversial questions remain: Can objective requirements be found for the process of balancing interests or does the application of this principle lead to arbitrary or subjective results in international law? Which role do courts play in the application and
interpretation of this principle? Is the principle of proportionality interpreted differently in specific areas of international law or can it, on the contrary, be used as a tool to decrease fragmentation in international law? Can the principle of proportionality promote global constitutionalization?

Contributions in the field of Public International Law or European Law in German or English are most welcome, especially concerning the following topics:

- Theory, doctrine and history of Public International Law
- European Union Law
- Human Rights, especially the European Convention on Human Rights
- International Humanitarian Law, questions of international peace and security and selfdefence
- World Trade Law and International Investment Law
- International Environmental Law

This event is supposed to provide a forum for dialogue between young as well as experienced scholars. Therefore, senior scholars will comment on the contributions of junior researchers.

Interested participants are asked to submit their abstracts by 15 February 2014 to: ajvdgir2014@uni-goettingen.de. The abstract should not exceed 500 words and needs to be anonymized. Please submit your contact details (name, institution, email address) only in the email itself. You will be notified about the acceptance of your proposal by 15 March 2014. Please note that invited speakers will need to submit their papers by 31 July 2014. We aim to provide for the possibility of publication for selected papers. It is expected that travel and accommodation expenses will be covered to a certain extent.

Please find further information at www.uni-goettingen.de/ajv-tagung.

Link to Call

From Legal Scholarship Blog
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Call for Papers: International Courts and National Courts, Politics and Society 

International courts and national courts, politics and society

Conference in Copenhagen September 11-12 2014

Since the establishment of the first permanent international court in 1922, states have created more than 25 international judicial bodies. The trend toward international judicialization has accelerated after the end of the Cold War. States have established a cascade of international courts and tribunals, the mandates of which go well beyond peace and arbitration to cover issues as diverse as human rights, international criminal law, trade and investment. And new courts are being called for in issue-areas where they do not yet exist, such as the regulation of climate change or transnational corporate wrongdoing. Moreover, in some areas, courts have arguably managed to expand their authority beyond their original mandates, and engage not only in adjudicating, interpreting and monitoring international treaty compliance, but increasingly contribute to the making of international law.

This development suggests a number of challenging research puzzles, especially as international courts impact on domestic political orders. For instance, how do governments, parliaments, national courts, bureaucracies and other sub-state actors and institutions interact with the new authority of international courts? Under which conditions do they become effective nationally? And why have states decided to establish these international courts in the first place? Moreover, how do domestic agents resist, adapt to, or utilize international judicial institutions? How does this new and expanding international judiciary impact on established national constitutional democratic orders? And what role do international courts play in sustaining and developing the global order - and how does this role affect politics and society at large?

For this conference, we invite both political science, sociology and law papers that address both the impact of international judicial institutions on domestic legal and political orders that is the general trend toward international juridicialization and the domestic politics conditions under which states choose to adopt international case law, conventions and judicial institutions. We welcome papers aimed at empirical explanation or theoretical assessment, and particularly papers that have a comparative perspective. Whereas previous research on the domestic impact of international courts and conventions has so far primarily focused on autocracies, we are particularly interested in 'rule of law' countries as these must be expected to have fewer problems adopting international case law and conventions into their national legal order. Or do they? Very little research has in fact been asking and investigating this question.

Organizers: Johan Karlsson Schaffer, Senior Researcher at the Norwegian Centre for Human Rights, University of Oslo & PluriCourts; Marlene Wind, Professor of Political Science and Centre Director for Centre for European Politics at the Faculty of Social Sciences, University of Copenhagen. She is also member of the leadership team and project coordinator at iCourts – Centre of Excellence for International Courts at the Faculty of Law, University of Copenhagen) and Professor II at Oslo University with PluriCourts.

Please submit your paper proposal to: Zuzanna.Godzimirska@jur.ku.dk or Kristoffer.schaldemose@gmail.com by first of March 2014 at the latest.

From International Law Reporter

Link to Call
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Immigration Law Professors Workshop  

A major focus of the biennial Immigration Law Professors Workshop is the opportunity for immigration scholars to share scholarship in progress. Opportunities will be available to receive feedback from colleagues on draft papers and on ideas in the formative stage during incubator sessions.

The members of the Works in Progress committee for the conference are: Huyen Pham (Texas A&M, Chair); Jill Family (Widener); Kit Johnson (Oklahoma); Jennifer Koh (Western State); and Stephen Lee (UC Irvine). After the committee receives submissions in response to this call, the committee will solicit and assign commentator(s) for each work in progress, based on shared scholarship interests. The committee also plans to form the discussion groups for the works in progress sessions largely based on attendees' expressed preferences. We will do our best to honor preferences, but the need to create balanced groups may sometimes be an overriding factor. The date and time for each work in progress session will be posted on the conference website in early May.

We hope to have room for all who express interest in presenting a work in progress. If we face any constraints, we will give priority to junior scholars and drafts submitted on time.
Submission Instructions

By March 21, 2014, please email to Amy Guthrie (arguthrie@law.tamu.edu) the title and abstract for your work in progress that you wish to present at the Immigration Law Professors Workshop. Please also identify whether this is a draft paper or an idea for an incubator session.

By April 21, 2014, please upload your draft paper (maximum 50 pages) or a brief description of your incubator idea (maximum 3 pages) to the workshop website. Further instructions for uploading will follow in April. The website will be password protected so that only conference attendees will be able to download these documents.
Interested in Serving as a Commentator?

Please let Kit Johnson (kit.johnson@ou.edu) know if you are interested in serving as a commentator during a works in progress session. Commentators will lead the discussion, but others are encouraged to participate as well.
Questions?

If you have any questions about the works in progress sessions or the submission procedure, please contact Jill Family (jefamily@widener.edu).

Link
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Barry University School of Law Environmental and Earth Law Journal: Call for Papers 

The Barry University School of Law Environmental and Earth Law Journal seeks papers that advance the application and practice of Environmental Law.

Call for Participation
For our Fourth Volume, we seek a broad range of participants - including scholars, practitioners, elected officials, activists, community leaders and students. Paper topics should address the following areas of academic inquiry:
• Environmental Justice
• Earth Law
• Earth Jurisprudence

Submission Guidelines
If you would like to be considered for publication in our Spring 2014 Volume, please submit your article through the Environmental and Earth Law Journal Digital Commons page locate at http://lawpublications.barry.edu/ejejj/. Once you have accessed the link provided, please click on “Submit Article.”

The Article Submission Deadline is March 1, 2014.

We will notify all selected participants by mail or email, depending on the submission information provided. We request that all participants provide both an email address and a mailing address.

Selected contributors must submit their finished papers to the Journal no later than May 1, 2014. If selected, Final Submissions may be of any length up to a maximum of 50 pages, in a double-spaced, 8.5 x 11-inch page format with 12-point font (10-point for footnotes). You will receive a confirmation by e-mail.

General Submission Rules
Submitted articles cannot have been previously published, nor be forthcoming in an archival journal or book (print or electronic). Please note: "publication" in a working-paper series does not constitute prior publication. In addition, by submitting material to Environmental and Earth Law Journal, the author is stipulating that the material is not currently under review at another journal (electronic or print) and that he or she will not submit the material to another journal (electronic or print) until the completion of the editorial decision process at Environmental and Earth Law Journal. If you have concerns about the submission terms for Environmental and Earth Law Journal, please contact Chris Parkinson at christopher.parkinson@law.barry.edu.

Selection
Submitted articles will be judged on the following criteria: relevance to the practice of law in the specified areas, timeliness and importance of selected topic, organization, quality of legal analysis, quality of legal research, and quality of the overall writing.

For More Information Please Contact:
Chris Parkinson
Lead Articles Editor
Environmental and Earth Law Journal
christopher.parkinson@law.barry.edu
(315) 269-4497



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Call for Papers: Consequences of the Responsibility of Non-State Actors in International Law — Vancouver 

International Conference, Kwantlen Polytechnic University, Richmond Campus (Greater Regional District of Vancouver), British Columbia, Canada, June 2013

The Committee of Non-State Actors of the International Law Association (ILA), The Institute for Transborder Studies (ITS) at Kwantlen Polytechnic University, the Leuven Centre for Global Governance Studies, Oxford Brookes University, in collaboration with the ILA-Canada, the Flemish Scientific Research Fund (FWO, ‘the network’), and the Canadian Bar Association – British Columbia Branch invite papers on the responsibilities of non-state actors in international law for a conference in Vancouver on 27-28 June 2013.

Link to the Call
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CALL FOR PAPERS SPRING 2013 ISSUE ON MEDIA LAW 

The University of Florida Journal of Law and Public Policy (JLPP), celebrating its 25th anniversary, is organizing a special issue on media law for spring 2013.

Papers submitted for consideration in this issue may include articles, essays and book reviews and should focus on topics related to media law, including First Amendment, defamation, privacy or intellectual property.

Submission guidelines: Please submit any papers you would like to be considered for publication in our special issue in Word document format to kcarnley@ufl.edu by January 15, 2013.

For more information about our Journal and our submission requirements, visit our page on the submissions guidelines.

Symposium: Authors invited to publish in the special issue on media law may also be invited to participate in the spring 2013 media law symposium, hosted by the Journal at the UF Levin College of Law.

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Call for Papers: New Voices in Comparative Law – Indianapolis, IN 

The Younger Comparativists Committee of the American Society of Comparative Law invite submissions for its April 18-19, 2013, conference at the Indiana University Robert H. McKinney School of Law.

To submit an entry, scholars should email an attachment in Microsoft Word or PDF containing an abstract of no more than 750 words no later than November 4, 2012, to the following address: yccsubmissions[@]gmail.com. Abstracts should reflect original research that will not yet have been published, though may have been accepted for publication, by the time of the conference. Abstracts should also include the author’s name, title of the paper, institutional affiliation, contact information, as well as the author’s certification that she/he qualifies as a younger scholar. Graduate students should identify themselves as such.

Please direct all inquiries to Richard Albert, Chair of the Younger Comparativists Committee of the American Society of Comparative Law, by email at richard.albert[@]bc.edu or telephone at 617.552.3930.
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CALL FOR PAPERS Expanding the Gaze: Gender, Public Space, and Surveillance 

Deadline: September 15, 2012

The past decade has witnessed an explosion of scholarship covering the broad area of surveillance studies. Surveillance, or the ability to engage in what David Lyon (2003) calls ‘social sorting’, is understood by social scientists to be key to neoliberal governance, in large part because of its capacity to reconfigure both public space and forms of citizenship. And yet, to date, very little scholarly work systematically considers the gendered dimensions of, and experiences with, surveillance. The little research that does exist indicates the need for more in-depth study. This edited collection seeks to engage with contemporary studies on surveillance by expanding the gaze to include a critical analysis of gender and public space.

The aim of the collection is to capture a wide range of gendered experiences, identities, and subjectivities, including, but not limited to, those of ‘women’. By public space we are referring to those places to which the public has reasonable expectations of access. This space might be privately owned, public space, or a hybrid; it may be physical (e.g. shopping malls, city streets) or virtual (e.g. public on-line profiles and social media platforms). Surveillance itself may be technological (e.g. CCTV) or informal (e.g. ‘eyes on the street’). The key uniting theme of ‘Expanding the Gaze: Gender, Public Space, and Surveillance’ is the ways that the dimensions of gender, public space, and surveillance interact to produce particular configurations that have yet to be fully explored.

This call for papers seeks innovative feminist and/or intersectional scholarship for an interdisciplinary edited collection of original works. We welcome submissions from a variety of perspectives and academic disciplines, including: communication studies, criminology, geography, law, sexuality studies, socio-legal studies, sociology, and/or women’s and gender studies. Papers may be theoretical or empirical in nature.

Topics may include (but are not limited to)

- Surveillance, bodies, and forms of citizenship
- Sexuality/ies and surveillance
- Masculinity/ies and surveillance
- Gendered resistance to surveillance
- Gender and urban CCTV
- Surveillance and the intersectionality of gender, race, and class
- Media/cinematic representations of surveillance
- Relationships between the watchers and being watched

Abstract submission:

Interested contributors should send a 300-500 word abstract and 200 word
bio to genderedlens@gmail.com no later than September 15, 2012.

Those invited to contribute to the collection will be notified in October 2012 and full papers will be due in April 2013.

Please direct questions to collection editor:

Emily van der Meulen,
evandermeulen@ryerson.ca
Department of Criminal Justice and Criminology
Ryerson University, Toronto, Canada.

Link to Posting
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Call for Submissions: Special Issue of the International Community Law Review  

Call for Submissions: Reservations to Treaties

The editors of the International Community Law Review are pleased to announce a call for papers for a special issue of the journal on ‘Reservations to International Treaties’.

The International Community Law Review is a peer-reviewed academic journal, published quarterly by Brill/Nijhoff. The journal addresses all aspects of international law and the international community, and aims to explore the implications of various traditions of international law and how the international community uses and adapts international law to deal with new and emerging challenges.

Submissions are invited for the special issue on all aspects of the topic, particularly those commenting on the International Law Commission’s 2011 Guide to Practice on Reservations to Treaties, and the report of Special Rapporteur Mr Alan Pellet. Areas of interest may include:

The effect of impermissible reservations

Temporal limitations on the lodging of objections to impermissible reservations

The impact of interpretive declarations

Reservations to human rights treaties

All those with an interest in the subject are invited to contribute articles for publication in the special issue. Proposals for papers should be should be no more than 15000 words, and be submitted to the editors here by 31st January 2013. Publication is expected in the third quarter of 2013.

For further information please contact Sarah Singer at iclr.managing.editor@gmail.com

From International Law Reporter
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