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INTA Trademark Scholarship Symposium in Hong Kong 

Fifth Annual INTA Trademark Scholarship Symposium in Hong Kong, May 12, 2014

The International Trademark Association (“INTA”) is pleased to host the Fifth Annual Trademark Scholarship Symposium during the 136th INTA Annual Meeting in Hong Konghttp://www.inta.org/AnnualMeeting/Pages/HongKong2014.aspx. The Symposium will take place on Monday, May 12, 2014 as part of INTA’s Academic Day and is an opportunity for trademark scholars from around the world to present a complete, or near complete, work of trademark scholarship to practitioners and academics. This year we are only selecting 1-4 papers, which will be presented with a practitioner and an academic commentator, rather than in the traditional workshop setting.

Please send an abstract (approximately 300 words) describing a current trademark or unfair competition scholarship project to Co-Chairs Signe H. Naeve at SNaeve@uw.edu and Jeremy Sheff at sheffj@stjohns.edu by February 15, 2014. The Task Force will then select a maximum of 4 papers to be presented at the Symposium. Selections will be announced by March 1, 2014. For each selected project, a near complete draft of the paper must be submitted by April 1, 2013. There is no publication obligation.

Participants will receive complimentary enrollment in the Academic Day program, including an all-professor panel exploring boundaries of trademark law, a trademark professor luncheon offering perspectives from in-house counsel, a reception and other networking opportunities. Airfare and accommodations are the speaker’s responsibility. For INTA membership and Annual Meeting registration information, please contact Carin Diep-Dixon at cdiep@inta.org.

From IP and IT Conferences
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Intellectual Property Scholars Conference 2014 at Berkeley 



The Berkeley Center for Law and Technology at the UC Berkeley School of Law will host the 14th Annual Intellectual Property Scholars Conference on August 7th and 8th, 2014. The conference is co-sponsored by the Berkeley Center for Law and Technology, UC Berkeley School of Law; the Intellectual Property Program, Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law at Yeshiva University; the Center for Intellectual Property Law and Information Technology, DePaul University College of Law; and the Stanford Program in Law, Science & Technology, Stanford Law School.

The IP Scholars Conference brings together intellectual property scholars to present their works-in-progress and to listen and discuss others’ works. The format of the conference is designed to facilitate open discussion and to help scholars hone their ideas. Papers presented should be works-in-progress that can benefit from the input provided by IPSC attendees.

Requests to Present: Requests to present should be submitted electronically no later than May 5, 2014, by submitting an abstract of the work-in-progress at http://ipscholars.org. Every effort will be made to accommodate full-time IP scholars who submit a request by the deadline. Requests from research fellows, non-U.S. researchers, and practicing attorneys as well as late submissions will be considered to the extent that time and space permit.

Presentation Decisions: Final decisions on requests to present will be made by May 30, 2014, and requestors will be notified at that time. A wait-list will be created in order to allow some speakers to be added in the event that selected presenters are unable to attend.

Final abstracts for inclusion in the conference binder and papers for posting on the conference website will be due July 25, 2014. Final papers and abstracts should be submitted to BCLT Associate Director, Louise Lee, at llee@law.berkeley.edu.

Requests to Attend: BCLT welcomes attendance by full-time academics who would like to participate in discussions but do not plan to present their own work. Requests to attend should be registered at http://ipscholars.org.

There is no registration fee for the conference. Breakfast and lunch will be provided on both days. There will also be a conference dinner on August 7th. Conference presenters and attendees are expected to pay for their own transportation and lodging costs. A block of rooms will be reserved by BCLT for conference attendees at a discounted group rate. Check for updates on hotel accommodations at http://ipscholars.org.

Please feel free to contact Louise Lee with any questions at:

Louise Lee
Associate Director
Berkeley Center for Law & Technology
University of California, Berkeley, School of Law
354 Boalt Hall
Berkeley, CA 94720-7200

Office Phone: (925) 386-6827
Fax: (510) 643-1328
Email: llee@law.berkeley.edu
Website: bclt.berkeley.edu/

From IP and TI Conferences
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Call For Papers: AALS Workshop on Transnational Perspectives for Equality Law 

Corrected email address for submissions: 14-tpelcfp@aals.org

Workshop on Transnational Perspectives for Equality Law

June 22-24, 2014 | Washington, D.C.

We are seeking proposals for presentations and papers for the 2014 Mid-Year Workshop on Transnational Perspectives for Equality Law. The workshop will be held on June 22-24, 2014 in Washington, DC at the Renaissance Mayflower Hotel. The workshop will begin with registration at 4:00 p.m. and a reception at 6:00 p.m. on Sunday, June 22 and conclude at 2:00 p.m. on Tuesday, June 24. It will appeal to a wide range of teachers and scholars interested in these and related subject areas.

ll for Presentations and Papers

The Workshop will feature several plenary panels. These panels will address the following themes and subjects: the relevance of foreign law in the U.S. constitutional interpretation; the rise of quotas as a policy tool to achieve race and gender balance in legislatures, workplaces, and institutions of higher learning; a comparative assessment of disparate impact doctrine or indirect discrimination; a comparative analysis of secularism and religious tolerance; modalities and methodologies for teaching transnational law in U.S. law schools.

The Workshop Planning Committee seeks proposals for presentations and papers on any of the Workshop themes or on relevant issues at the intersection of transnational perspectives and equality law. Selected papers will be presented in one of two concurrent sessions on Tuesday June 24, 2014 between 10:30 A.M. – 12:00 P.M. For these concurrent sessions we are seeking proposals that are in various stages of development. We expect to select three or four presentations for each of the concurrent sessions. Each presentation will be about 15 minutes, followed by questions from the moderator and the audience.

Interested faculty members should submit a brief written description (no more than 1000 words) of the proposed presentation or paper, along with their résumés. Please email these materials to 14-tpelcfp@aals.org by Friday, December 20, 2013.

From Faculty Awareness Blog

Link to Call

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INTERNATIONAL LAW WEEKEND 2014 Call For Proposals 

In anticipation of International Law Weekend 2014 – the premier international law event of the fall season, to be held on October 23-25, 2014, in New York City – the sponsors would like to invite you and your colleagues to submit proposals for panels, roundtables, and lectures at International Law Weekend (ILW) 2014. The overall theme of ILW 2014 is International Law in a Time of Chaos.

ILW is sponsored and organized by the American Branch of the International Law Association (ABILA) – which welcomes new members from academia, the practicing bar, and the diplomatic world – and the International Law Students Association (ILSA). This annual conference attracts an audience of more than one thousand practitioners, academics, diplomats, members of the governmental and nongovernmental sectors, and most importantly, foreign policy and law students who are learning about the range of practice and career opportunities.


Call for Proposals

The unifying theme for this year’s meeting is International Law in a Time of Chaos. The role of international law in conflict mitigation remains key – whether by building commercial links between states, fighting corruption, improving democratic governance, or providing methods for resolving international and ethnic disputes. International Law Weekend 2014 will seek to address the role of public and private international lawyers in each of these tasks.

Panel proposals may concern any aspect of international law, including trade, investment, arbitration, intellectual property, combatting corruption, labor standards in the global supply chain, and human rights, as well as issues of international organizations and international security.

The ILW Organizing Committee invites proposals to be submitted online via the ILW Panel Proposal Submission Form located at: http://www.ilsa.org/index.php?option=co ... _Proposals on or before Friday, March 21, 2014.

Please provide a title, brief description of the topic, and the names, titles, and affiliations of the chair and likely speakers – but also describe what you think would be the most engaging and exciting format, including ways to enhance participation by the audience. Thus, we encourage suggestions of varied formats, such as debates, roundtables, lectures, and break-out groups, as well as the usual practice of panel presentations. One of the objectives of ILW 2014 is to promote new dialogues among scholars and practicing lawyers; so formats should include presenters with diverse experiences and perspectives.

From International Law Reporter

Link to Call
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Call for Papers: Foundations and Futures of International Law (Update)  

The call for Foundations and Futures of International Law has been extended to February 15th. Here is a link to the original posting.


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Call For Participation Comparative Urban Law Conference 

June 30, 2014, London, England

The Fordham Urban Law Center is pleased to announce a call for participation for the Comparative Urban Law Conference, which will be held on Monday, June 30, 2014 at Loyola Hall, University of London. The Conference will gather legal and other scholars for a provocative, engaging conversation about the field of "urban law" from an international, comparative, and interdisciplinary perspective. The Conference will focus on the nature and boundaries of urban law as a discipline, which participants will explore through overlapping themes such as the structure of local authority and autonomy and the role of law in urban policy areas such as environmental sustainability, consumer protection, public health, housing, and criminal justice, among others. The goal is to facilitate an in-depth exploration across sub-specialties within the legal academy to help develop an understanding of urban law in the twenty-first century.

PAPER SUBMISSION PROCEDURE: Potential participants in panels and workshops throughout the day should submit a one-page proposal to Professor Nestor Davidson at ndavidson@law.fordham.edu. If you are already working on a draft paper, please include that draft with your submission, but participants do not need to have prepared a formal paper to join the conversation. The deadline for topic proposal submissions is Thursday, February 13. We will discuss potential publishing options available as a result of conference participation. Please contact Annie Decker at adecker2@law.fordham.edu with any questions.

ABOUT THE URBAN LAW CENTER: The Urban Law Center at Fordham Law School in New York City is committed to understanding and affecting the legal system's place in contemporary urbanism. See: http://law.fordham.edu/urbanlawcenter.htm for more information about our activities.
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Call for Papers: Legal and Ethical Issues in Predictive Data Analytics 

RESEARCH COLLOQUIUM: CALL FOR PAPERS LEGAL AND ETHICAL ISSUES IN PREDICTIVE DATA ANALYTICS

June 19 & 20, 2014
Blacksburg, Va.
Abstract Submission Deadline: March 3, 2014

A research colloquium, “Legal and Ethical Issues in Predictive Data Analytics,” hosted by Professor Janine Hiller of Virginia Tech and co-organized by Professor Tonia Hap Murphy of the University of Notre Dame, is sponsored by the Center for Business Intelligence and Analytics in the Pamplin College of Business, Virginia Tech. Topics include privacy and data security and consumer protection: price discrimination, targeting.

Up to four invitations for research presentation slots will be extended based on this call for papers. In order to receive consideration, researchers are invited to submit an abstract by March 3, 2014.

TOPIC:

Various terms are used to describe the collection and use of data for decision-making. Big data and data mining are two common terms that indicate the breadth and depth of data sets and the subsequent use of that data to extract new meaning. Used here, data analytics references a mathematical process that can discover trends, connections, and relationships that may then feed into various models and processes. Furthermore, analytics implies that data is used to make decisions that affect individuals or businesses based on the result of algorithmic-derived predictions.

Legal scholarship related to the use of data analytics and its predictive application is sparse, yet there are important questions that call for discussion. For example, a recurrent legal issue in data management is the question of privacy rights and obligations for securing information. Particular statutes protect health, financial, and children’s information to a certain extent. Without a doubt, data analytics impacts privacy concerns more intensely and in new ways; the meaning of individual privacy is challenged in an environment where new personal insights are algorithmically “discovered” because of widely aggregated data and analytic techniques. Zarsky describes the different types of data analysis and predictive modeling in setting the background for a proposed transparency taxonomy for predictive analytics. More broadly, Balkan notes that, “data mining technologies allow the state and business enterprises to record perfectly innocent behavior that no one is particularly ashamed of and draw surprisingly powerful inferences about people's behavior, beliefs, and attitudes.”

As sophisticated data analysis and its predictive application becomes ubiquitous, what are the legal and ethical considerations for society, business and government? What laws protect individuals and corporations from data overreach and predictive applications? What laws should be modified in order to reap the benefits of data analytics and predictive modeling? What areas of commerce are most impacted? How are these questions being addressed by different legal structures? Beyond legal questions, what ethical questions and frameworks are important for the use of predictive analytics?

This colloquium seeks to promote research on the legal and ethical issues presented by the predictive use of analytics in society, emphasizing uses by business entities.

Issues of interest include, but are not limited to, the following categories that are relevant to the discussion of data analysis, predictive modeling, and decision-making processes:

Privacy and data security

Consumer protection: price discrimination, targeting

Employment decisions and analytics

Corporate governance: decision-making, risk management, and oversight

Health analytics and ethics

Insurance: benefits, prices, structures

Intellectual property: data and analytic ownership, trade secret protection

Legal system: due process, e-discovery, evidentiary issues

Antitrust: collusion and data

International legal comparisons

Ethical use of predictive data analytics in commerce

National security: inferences, actions, and automation derived from data

Submissions: To be considered, please submit an abstract of up to 750 words to Janine Hiller at jhiller@vt.edu, and copied to tmurphy1@nd.edu by March 3, 2014. Abstracts will be evaluated based upon the quality of the abstract and the topic’s fit with other presentations. Questions may be directed to Janine Hiller at jhiller@vt.edu or Tonia Hap Murphy at tmurphy1@nd.edu.

Those submitting abstracts will be informed of the outcome by March 17, 2014. If accepted, the author agrees to submit a discussion paper of 7,500 to 10,000 words by June 2, 2014. Formatting will be either APA or Bluebook. The paper need not be in final form; however, it should be complete enough to benefit from and elicit discussion at the colloquium. In the case of papers with multiple authors, only one author may attend and present at the colloquium.

The organizers are negotiating publication options for colloquium papers, with the goal of producing a scholarly book or special journal issue. While a final decision is pending, we are firmly optimistic about an ultimate publication. Authors agree to submit their final papers to be edited for inclusion in such a future publication. It is anticipated that final submissions and editing will occur in the fall of 2014.

From Consumer Law & Policy Blog
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Call for Papers: Vulnerability, Resilience, and Public Responsibility for Social and Economic Justice 

The German Society of International Law (Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationales Recht - DGIR) in cooperation with the Working Group of Young Scholars in Public International Law (Arbeitskreis junger Völkerrechtswissenschaftler/-innen - AjV) will be hosting a joint conference on Proportionality in International Law

The conference will take place at the Georg-August-University in Göttingen from the 12th until the 13th of September 2014.

The principle of proportionality is an integral part of several areas of Public International Law, which can be illustrated inter alia by the following questions: Which role does proportionality play when military advantages are being assessed compared to the death of civilians? How can international watercourses be used in an equitable and reasonable manner? To what extent can trade restrictions be balanced against environmental protection? Even though proportionality is a widely accepted principle, a lot of controversial questions remain: Can objective requirements be found for the process of balancing interests or does the application of this principle lead to arbitrary or subjective results in international law? Which role do courts play in the application and
interpretation of this principle? Is the principle of proportionality interpreted differently in specific areas of international law or can it, on the contrary, be used as a tool to decrease fragmentation in international law? Can the principle of proportionality promote global constitutionalization?

Contributions in the field of Public International Law or European Law in German or English are most welcome, especially concerning the following topics:

- Theory, doctrine and history of Public International Law
- European Union Law
- Human Rights, especially the European Convention on Human Rights
- International Humanitarian Law, questions of international peace and security and selfdefence
- World Trade Law and International Investment Law
- International Environmental Law

This event is supposed to provide a forum for dialogue between young as well as experienced scholars. Therefore, senior scholars will comment on the contributions of junior researchers.

Interested participants are asked to submit their abstracts by 15 February 2014 to: ajvdgir2014@uni-goettingen.de. The abstract should not exceed 500 words and needs to be anonymized. Please submit your contact details (name, institution, email address) only in the email itself. You will be notified about the acceptance of your proposal by 15 March 2014. Please note that invited speakers will need to submit their papers by 31 July 2014. We aim to provide for the possibility of publication for selected papers. It is expected that travel and accommodation expenses will be covered to a certain extent.

Please find further information at www.uni-goettingen.de/ajv-tagung.

Link to Call

From Legal Scholarship Blog
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Call for Submissions: Transnational Legal Theory Symposium on Transnational Criminal Law  

Transnational Legal Theory
Call for Papers Spring 2014:
A Symposium on Transnational Criminal Law

Transnational Legal Theory publishes high-quality theoretical scholarship that addresses transnational dimensions of law and legal dimensions of transnational fields, regulatory regimes and evolving normative-institutional arenas.

The journal is currently accepting submissions for a special symposium issue that addresses the potential and substance of Transnational Criminal Law (TCL), an evolving and still largely under-explored field of law. TCL is at the intersection of domestic, international and comparative criminal law and reaches deep into contemporary debates over conceptions of crime and illegality, social values and regulatory politics.

Submissions to the symposium may approach the topic from any number of angles, including (but not limited to):

Theory and Definition

What is transnational criminal law?

What are the implications or added value of transnational criminal law to domestic criminal law?

Actors and Participants

Who benefits from regimes of transnational criminal law? Who is disadvantaged?

Who has agency to define and shape transnational criminal law?

How does culture inform the development or acceptance of transnational criminal law?

Existing and Emerging Regulatory Regimes

What issues arise related to legitimacy of such regimes?

What problems would arise in the application of transnationalized criminal law with regards to, for example, effectiveness or enforcement?

What trends are emerging in the politics of criminalization/decriminalization?

Outlook and Prospects

How do we address and resolve such issues?

What will transnational criminal law regimes change over the next few years? Over the next decade?

We are inviting abstracts and/or full paper submissions for anonymous peer review. Abstracts outlining the direction of the planned submission are invited by Monday 17 February 2014 and final papers are due by Monday 28 April 2014. Abstracts and/or submissions as well as any inquiries should be directed to tlteditorial@hartpub.co.uk or PZumbansen@osgoode.yorku.ca.

From International Law Reporter

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Call for Papers: International Courts and National Courts, Politics and Society 

International courts and national courts, politics and society

Conference in Copenhagen September 11-12 2014

Since the establishment of the first permanent international court in 1922, states have created more than 25 international judicial bodies. The trend toward international judicialization has accelerated after the end of the Cold War. States have established a cascade of international courts and tribunals, the mandates of which go well beyond peace and arbitration to cover issues as diverse as human rights, international criminal law, trade and investment. And new courts are being called for in issue-areas where they do not yet exist, such as the regulation of climate change or transnational corporate wrongdoing. Moreover, in some areas, courts have arguably managed to expand their authority beyond their original mandates, and engage not only in adjudicating, interpreting and monitoring international treaty compliance, but increasingly contribute to the making of international law.

This development suggests a number of challenging research puzzles, especially as international courts impact on domestic political orders. For instance, how do governments, parliaments, national courts, bureaucracies and other sub-state actors and institutions interact with the new authority of international courts? Under which conditions do they become effective nationally? And why have states decided to establish these international courts in the first place? Moreover, how do domestic agents resist, adapt to, or utilize international judicial institutions? How does this new and expanding international judiciary impact on established national constitutional democratic orders? And what role do international courts play in sustaining and developing the global order - and how does this role affect politics and society at large?

For this conference, we invite both political science, sociology and law papers that address both the impact of international judicial institutions on domestic legal and political orders that is the general trend toward international juridicialization and the domestic politics conditions under which states choose to adopt international case law, conventions and judicial institutions. We welcome papers aimed at empirical explanation or theoretical assessment, and particularly papers that have a comparative perspective. Whereas previous research on the domestic impact of international courts and conventions has so far primarily focused on autocracies, we are particularly interested in 'rule of law' countries as these must be expected to have fewer problems adopting international case law and conventions into their national legal order. Or do they? Very little research has in fact been asking and investigating this question.

Organizers: Johan Karlsson Schaffer, Senior Researcher at the Norwegian Centre for Human Rights, University of Oslo & PluriCourts; Marlene Wind, Professor of Political Science and Centre Director for Centre for European Politics at the Faculty of Social Sciences, University of Copenhagen. She is also member of the leadership team and project coordinator at iCourts – Centre of Excellence for International Courts at the Faculty of Law, University of Copenhagen) and Professor II at Oslo University with PluriCourts.

Please submit your paper proposal to: Zuzanna.Godzimirska@jur.ku.dk or Kristoffer.schaldemose@gmail.com by first of March 2014 at the latest.

From International Law Reporter

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