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Sustainable Development and International Investment Law: Bridging the Divide 

We have seen a significant increase over the past decade in the number of investment treaties and treaty-based disputes, each contributing to the vast and evolving international investment regime, and each with important implications for sustainable development.

The proliferation of treaties stems from host states wanting to attract foreign investment and all of its potential associated benefits for development (i.e. job creation, broader tax base,
improvement in infrastructure, technology and skill transfer etc.); the assumption has been that the investor protections afforded in these treaties will facilitate the flow of investment and the
associated benefits. However, the rapid growth in the number of treaty-based claims filed by investors reflects investors’ increased willingness to safeguard their investments from any
adverse state conduct. In addition to cases based on states’ wrongful conduct, a wide variety of domestic measures relevant to sustainable development, such as legitimate fiscal and industrial
policy, environmental protection, and access to essential services, have also been challenged under the agreements. Such claims by investors, whether successful or not, can cause a state to
think twice before adopting legitimate regulations, suggesting that treaties may in fact impede states’ policy space to promote sustainable development domestically. Investment treaties,
therefore, can be seen to represent both a tool and a challenge for sustainable development.

The Vale Columbia Center on Sustainable International Investment (VCC) is issuing this call for papers to explore how to “bridge the divide” between achieving necessary protections of foreign investors while promoting the sustainable development of the host state. In this regard, the call for papers aims to foster analysis and ongoing discussion on ways in which sustainable development norms (broadly defined) can and/or do manifest themselves in international investment law. Topics that might be addressed by submissions include:
• An assessment of the investment treaty standards in relation to sustainable development
• The application of international law generally to investment disputes, and its implications
for sustainable development
• Different approaches to investment treaty drafting to accommodate and further sustainable development
• Treaty interpretation techniques which encourage integration of norms related to sustainable development (including, but not limited to Article 31(3) of the Vienna Convention on the Law of Treaties)
• Standards of review in investment law
• A comparative analysis of investment law with other legal regimes that face similar issues relating to sustainable development (e.g. trade, human rights)
• The application of stabilization clauses in investment law
• Approaches to determining jurisdiction and admissibility of claims as they relate to the sustainable development
• Legal mechanisms for creating more sustainable partnerships between foreign investors and host states

Submissions are also welcomed on other topics not addressed above, but that otherwise relate to the theme of the call for papers.
Papers submitted will be considered for publication in the Yearbook on International Investment Law & Policy. Those interested in making a submission should submit an abstract no longer than
500 words. Finished papers and drafts are also welcome.
Abstracts should be emailed to Rahim Moloo, Senior Research Fellow, VCC (rahim.moloo@nyu.edu), and Lise Johnson, Lead Investment Law & Policy Researcher, VCC (lisejjohnson@gmail.com) by August 15, 2012. Finished papers will be due by October 31, 2012.

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From International Law Reporter
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Transnational Dispute Management -- Call for papers "Corruption and Arbitration" 

We are pleased to announce a forthcoming TDM special issue on "Corruption and Arbitration."

Edited by Prof. Dr. Richard Kreindler (Shearman & Sterling LLP) and Carolyn B. Lamm (White & Case LLP) this special issue will analyze new trends, developments, and challenges respecting the intersection between on the one hand allegations, suspicions or findings of corruption and on the other hand decisions by arbitral tribunals regarding jurisdiction, admissibility and the merits of commercial and investment disputes.

It has been some 40 years since an acute focus was placed, perhaps for the first time, on how an arbitral tribunal can, should or must conduct itself in the face of suspected or manifest illegality of the parties. The award in ICC Case No. 1110 (1963), rendered by Gunnar Lagergren, cast a sharp focus on issues of arbitration, including competence-competence and severability of the arbitration agreement, in the face of a suspected or manifestly illegal contract.

Against this background, the Special Issue intends to identify, critique and reconcile the different strands where possible and desirable, both from the arbitrator's and the party's perspective. The potential scope of the subject is indeed vast and possible topics for submission might include:

How can, should or must an arbitral tribunal act in the face of suspected corruption in a contract or an investment underlying the parties' dispute? How should a tribunal act in the face of corruption which is admitted or otherwise manifest?

Should the nature of the would-be illegality make a difference to the tribunal's assessment of its own jurisdiction? Of the separability of the agreement to arbitrate? Of arbitrability?

When should the issue of jurisdiction hinge on whether the corrupt act arguably tainted the contract or investment ab initio, as opposed to an illegality arising or becoming apparent only in the course of later performance?

Given suspected or manifest corruption, which standards of substantive law should apply as to whether and how to proceed respecting jurisdiction, admissibility, separability, arbitrability and the merits of the dispute? How should tribunals address differences in national law respecting the activities of agents, intermediaries and lobbyists? How should they reconcile national law with possibly competing "transnational public policy" or "international public policy"?

What challenges exist in terms of attribution of corrupt actions or knowledge of such actions to a state party in commercial arbitration, in investment arbitration, including in the context of the 2001 ILA Draft Articles on Responsibility of States?

How should burden of persuasion, burden of proof and the standard of proof be approached when faced with allegations or suspicions of corruption? What standard or standards should apply when and why? -- Can the rights and duties of the arbitrator to investigate corruption, including on his or her own initiative, be meaningfully identified? What about when such action collides or might collide with investigative efforts already undertaken or which might still be undertaken by national criminal authorities?

What justifications, excuses and defenses may exist to estop a party from invoking corruption on the part of the other party? What of the "unclean hands" doctrine and similar approaches?

What should be the legal consequences of a finding of corruption in commercial arbitration, in investment arbitration? When is it a question of jurisdiction, when of admissibility and when of the merits?

At the enforcement stage, what tensions may exist, where corruption has been alleged or proven, between the (un)enforceability of an arbitral award at the seat and the (un)enforceability of the same award in a foreign court? What limits should apply to de novo review by the foreign reviewing court?

What tools do arbitrators have, or not have, to investigate allegations of corruption, particularly when third parties may be involved?

Publication is expected in January 2013. Proposals for papers should be submitted to the editors by July 31, 2012.

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From International Law Reporter
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CALL FOR PAPERS Media, Communication Publics 2013 Conference of the CMCL 

The University of Melbourne Law School

25-26 February 2013


Please submit an abstract of up to 300 words including keywords and a biography of 100 words to law-cmcl@unimelb.edu.au

Call for papers closes 14th September 2012

Papers are now invited from researchers in law, media studies and related fields to this international conference.

Topics could include:
- Broadband futures
- Content creation, use and re-use - Copyright law, technology and control
- Data and surveillance
- Defamation and public debate
- Digital publics
- Journalism and popular media
- Media access
- Media futures
- Media representations of law
- Networks and social networking
- Privacy and publicity
- Public knowledge
- Public media
- Reporting courts
- Technology and rights
- Trade marks and speech
- User-generated content

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From IP and IT Conferences
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HT Symposium 2012 : Combating Human Trafficking Symposium 2012 

When Sep 25, 2012 - Sep 26, 2012
Where Bandung, Indonesia
Submission Deadline Aug 30, 2012
Notification Due Sep 5, 2012
Final Version Due Sep 15, 2012


Call For Papers
Data are reported by the International Organization for Migration (IOM) and the anti-trafficking-Non Governmental Organization (NGO) estimated 43% - 50% or about 3 - 4.5 million Indonesian workers are victims of human trafficking, 90% of whom were women and 56% are exploited in domestic work. Data issued by the IOM in 2010 are also mentioned as much as 82% of trafficked abroad and 18% in Indonesia. UNICEF ​​estimates that 100 thousand women and children - children are trafficked annually for commercial sexual exploitation in Indonesia and abroad, as much as 30% of female prostitutes in Indonesia are under 18 years and 40 thousand to 70 thousand children - children are victims of sexual exploitation.
Activities that have been made among other are Problems Mapping Workshop Crime of Trafficking in Persons (TPPO) through education. This workshop was held by Research Center for Gender and Child Development Research Institute and Community Services (LPPM) Padjadjaran University (Unpad) Bandung. The workshop revealed that 99% of trafficking victims are women. Data from the National Project Coordinator Unit Labor Counter IOM Indonesia trafficking revealed that most cases of trafficking from West Java. With small-scale activities and the absence of relevant parties, we have not been able to combat human trafficking in Indonesia. In addition, given the problems of human trafficking has become a culture in Indonesia, it takes continuous effort and cooperation of all elements.

Based on the above background, Padjadajaran University, Faculty of Communication Science in collaboration with Monash University in Australia and the West Java Provincial Government will conduct activities in the form of an International Symposium on Combating Human Trafficking with the theme.

Onjectives
The purpose of the International Symposium is to:
A. Build public awareness in the fight against human trafficking;
2. Provide a comprehensive understanding to the public in the fight against human trafficking;
3. Bring together academics, practitioners, bureaucrats, media practitioners, and relevant stakeholders in the fight against human trafficking;
4. Build a shared commitment among governments and relevant stakeholders in the fight against human trafficking.

Topic:
1. The Role of Government in Combating Human Trafficking
2. Mass Media and New Media in Human Trafficking
3. The Role of NGO in Combating Human Trafficking
4. Criminology in Human Trafficking
5. Communication Campaigns in Combating Human Trafficking
6. Regulation and Politics on Human Trafficking
7. Sociocultural, Economic and Human Trafficking
8. Gender Issues and Human Trafficking
9. Rehabilitation and Reintegration of Human Trafficking Victims
10. Civic Education and Human Trafficking, and other relevant topics.

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From WikiCFP

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The 2013 UK IVR Annual Conference -- Legal Theory and Legal History: A Neglected Dialogue? 

12 April 2013 - 13 April 2013
Time: 9:00am - 5:00pm
Venue: Law building, Queen Mary, University of London, Mile End


Overview

Apart from some notable exceptions, much of contemporary legal theory is uninformed by history, including legal history. This is deeply regrettable, for legal theories may be vastly improved by being informed, and perhaps more importantly, challenged by historical contexts. Theories of law, one might say, are better if they are forged at the coal-face of historical research. Similarly, one could argue that legal histories are better when they draw on, and themselves contribute to, the conceptual resources of legal theory.

Somewhat more radically, if one agrees law does not have a nature, but a culture, then one must account for how the culture of law changes, and has changed, over time. This, by necessity, demands a historically-informed methodology. Similarly, the problem of change is an unavoidable one in legal theory, whether that be change in legal regimes or changes in certain areas of the law – here, again, the resources of history, including the philosophy of history, are invaluable. Putting things a little more colourfully, one could say that legal ideas cannot but be understood historically.

Further, legal theory has, of course, its own history: legal theories are not disconnected islands, but rather interventions in a long series of dialogues and polylogues amongst theorists. As many have observed, and described, legal theory’s history needs to be informed not only by such dialogues and polylogues amongst theorists, but also by awareness of the theorist’s immersion in political, economic and other conditions of his or her time and place – there, once more, a serious engagement with history is important.

This conference - the annual conference of the UK Branch of the IVR - is designed to bring together legal theorists and legal historians (including historians of legal theory and political thought) in an attempt to facilitate and encourage dialogue between the two disciplines.
Call for Papers

A call for papers is issued for the open paper sessions. A group of selectors from the Legal Theory and Legal History Group at Queen Mary will select papers based on abstracts. Abstracts are to be no longer than one A4 page, and should include the name and affiliation of the author(s).

Strong preference will be given to papers related to the theme, broadly construed. However, papers may be submitted on any aspect of legal and social philosophy.

Abstracts should be emailed to m.delmar@qmul.ac.uk by 1 October 2012.

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IADIS International Conference  

Call for Papers

The IADIS e-Commerce 2012 conference is a major international event for researchers, academics, industry specialists, practitioners &
students interested in the advances in, and applications of, e-Commerce. The participants will have an opportunity to present and observe the latest research results, and ideas in these areas. This conference aims to cover both technological as well as non-technological issues related to this new business paradigm.

The Conference invites proposals from the introductory through advanced level on all topics related to e-Commerce. Proposals which address the theory, research and applications as well as describe innovative projects are encouraged. All papers submitted to this conference will be peer reviewed by at least two members of the International Program Committee.

Acceptance will be based primarily on originality, significance and quality of contribution.

Topics for this conference include, but are not limited to:

Commerce Technology

- e-Business Applications and Software

- Barriers to e-Business Adoption

- Cryptography for enabling e-Commerce

Global e-Commerce

- e-Commerce in developing countries

- Global e-Commerce

- Infrastructure for e-Commerce

Online Management

- Knowledge Management

- Managing Innovation

- Marketing on the Web

- e-Commerce Strategy & Implementation

- Economics of e-Commerce

- Internet payment systems

Online Business Models

- e-Logistics

- e-Government

- e-Procurement

- e-Services

- Business-oriented e-Commerce

- Consumer-oriented e-Commerce

- Web advertising and Web Publishing

- Retailing in e-Commerce (e-Tailing)

- Mobile Commerce

- Supply Chain Management & e-Fulfilment

- e-Communities

- Multimedia and Webcasting on the Web

- Other e-Commerce Models and Applications

Regulatory/Policy Issues

- Social Issues in e-Commerce

- The Regulatory Environment of e-Commerce

- Trust & Security Issues in e-Commerce


The Conference will be composed of several types of contributions:

Full Papers – These include mainly accomplished research results and have 8 pages at the maximum (5,000 words).

Short Papers – These are mostly composed of work in progress reports or fresh developments and have 4 pages at maximum
(2,500 words).

Reflection Papers – These might review recent research literature pertaining to a particular problem or approach, indicate what the findings suggest, and/or provide a suggestion - with rationale and justification - for a different approach or perspective on that problem. Reflection papers might also analyze general trends or discuss important issues in topics related to the conference. These have 4 pages at maximum (2,500 words).

Posters / Demonstrations – These contain implementation information or work-in-progress and have two pages at maximum(1,250 words) besides the poster itself (or demonstration) that will be exposed at the conference.

Tutorials – Tutorials can be proposed by scholars or company representatives. A proposal of maximum 250 words is expected.

Invited Talks – These will be made of contributions from well-known scholars and company representatives. An abstract will be
included in the conference proceedings.

Panels – Discussions on selected topics will be held. A proposal of maximum 250 words is expected.

Doctoral Consortium - A Doctoral Consortium will discuss in group, individual projects and on going work of PhD students.
Prospective students should send a report of their PhD projects and work so far with a maximum of 4 pages (2,500 words).

Corporate Showcases & Exhibitions – The former enables companies to present recent developments and applications, inform a
large and qualified audience of your future directions and showcase company’s noteworthy products and services. There will be a time slot for companies to make their presentation in a room. The latter enables companies the opportunity to display its latest offerings of hardware, software, tools, services and books, through an exhibit booth. For further details please contact the publicity chair - secretariat@mccsis.org.

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The International Conference on e-Democracy and Open Government-Asia 2012 

The International Conference on e-Democracy and Open Government-Asia 2012
(CeDEM-Asia-2012) is a forum that aims to bring together academics, researchers, policy-makers, industry professionals, and civil society activists to discuss the role of social and mobile media in the future of governance in Asia and elsewhere. CeDEMAsia-
2012 will be held on November 14-15 in Singapore.

Call for Papers
New means of interacting with government and political institutions are causing significant shifts in political and social life. The emerging social and mobile media practices, including content generation, collaboration, and network organization, are changing our understanding of governance and politics. While the changes are already widely debated in mature, developed democracies, there is an even greater need to address them in the context of rapidly developing Asian societies. Following five successful conferences at the Danube University of Krems, CeDEM is looking to open a
new forum in Asia for the exchange of ideas, networking, and collaboration on the topics of e-democracy and open government. This year, CeDEM is pleased to be working with the Asian Media Information and Communication Centre (AMIC) as its conference organizer and the Wee Kim Wee School of Communication and Information at Nanyang Technological University, Singapore as its main partner. CeDEM-Asia-2012 seeks to critically analyze present and future developments in field, with a special focus on the following themes:

Social media to engage citizens, smart & mobile democracy, sustainability of eparticipation

Mobilization via social media, networks vs. traditional party-structure, online
campaigning

Communication technologies and their use for governmental transformation

Open data initiatives, transparency, participation and collaboration in government

Cultures of governance, access and openness, crowdsourcing for government

Information provision, mobile devices, service delivery via new communication
channels

Online communities, innovation, bottom-up vs. top-down

Network effects, power laws, long tail, social web

Conference Chairs
Nojin Kwak (University of Michigan, USA)
Peter Parycek (Danube University Krems, Austria)
Marko M. Skoric (Nanyang Technological University, Singapore)
Contact
Peter Parycek: Peter.Parycek@donau-uni.ac.at
Marko M. Skoric: marko@ntu.edu.sg

Submission Guidelines
The submission portal will be open mid June 2012: www.cedem-conference.org/CeDEMasia2012

Research papers, case studies and policy papers should be 12 pages maximum and will be double-blind peer-reviewed.

Reflection papers should 6 pages maximum and will be selected by the chairs.

Workshop proposals should be no more than 2 pages and will be selected by the chairs.
Publications

The conference proceedings will be published (ISBN) and made available online under the Creative Commons License. A selection of best research papers and case studies of CeDEMAsia-
2012 will be published with the open access eJournal of eDemocracy and Open Government (www.jedem.org).

Important Dates
Submission deadline for full papers and workshop proposals: 15 July 2012
Notification of acceptance: 24 September 2012
Camera-ready paper submission: 15 October 2012
Conference dates & location: 14-15 November 2012, Singapore

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CAPTIVITY AND CULPABILITY THE DISCIPLINING SUBJECT IN THE LITERARY AND CULTURAL IMAGINATION 

14-15 DECEMBER 2012
SENATE HOUSE, LONDON

This conference aims to interrogate literary, filmic, popular cultural and artistic representations of the agents of those institutions, specifically in terms of guilt and culpability. Why, for example, can we observe a tendency to hold at a cautious distance the disciplining subject whilst accepting (or even celebrating) the institutions they represent as socially and politically necessary? Why, when the actions of such agents become extreme, transgressive or criminal, is there a tendency to pathologise such actions in terms of individual perversity – as the actions of ‘bad apples’ – and thereby transfer culpability from the institution to the individual subject, rather than explaining such actions in systemic, structural or institutional terms?

We invite papers that interrogate narrative negotiations of the tensions encountered by these figures and in these relationships; tensions between agency and victimhood, necessity and guilt, legitimate and abusive uses of power and violence. We may, for example, be overfamiliar with literary, filmic or popular cultural narratives of captivity that privilege the experience of incarceration or miscarriages of justice, in which the disciplining subject occupies a reified or stereotyped position; what representational potentials have remained underexplored in cultural or political discourses?

Our temporal focus is mainly on the 20th and 21st Centuries, but we do not exclude proposals for papers on earlier periods. Themes for papers could include, but are not limited to, narrative representations of

* Agency and victimhood
* Heroism/duty
* Ethical reflections on institutional and individual culpability
* Stereotypes/prejudices (and their deconstruction)
* Racial/ethnic/national inflections of ‘culpability’
* Women and normative masculinities
* Guilt, responsibility, deserved punitivity
* ‘Dirty work’
* ‘Clean’/non-scarring violence
* Legitimacy and the abuse of power
* State violence and its parameters
* Torturers, torture and abuse; the representation of torturers
* Trauma, testimony
* Colonial and neocolonial disciplinary configurations
* Authority, power, powerlessness
and
* Theoretical conceptualisations of disciplinary agents

The conference is organised by Alex Adams (Newcastle University) and Cornelia Wächter (University of Paderborn, Bielefeld University) in cooperation with the Institute of English Studies (University of London) and the Human Rights Consortium (University of London). Please email 200-300 word abstracts for 20 minute papers to a.t.adams@newcastle.ac.uk and cornelia.waechter@uni-paderborn.de by Sunday, 19th August 2012.

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From Society of Legal Scholars
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Southeastern Law Scholars Conference 

The Charleston School of Law is pleased to host the third annual Southeastern Law Scholars Conference on September 21-22, 2012. This regional conference will bring together junior law school faculty to present published papers or works-in-progress across all disciplines within the law. The conference is open to all junior law faculty (one to seven years teaching experience) at law schools in the United States. To ensure an atmosphere conducive to feedback, space is limited to twenty participants.

The conference will begin with a reception for all participants on Friday, September 21, 2012. On Saturday, September 22, 2012, conference participants will present either a completed paper or work-in-progress, and comment on the papers and ideas presented by others. As the host school, the Charleston School of Law will provide breakfast and lunch on Saturday, September 22. There is no registration fee. Participants, however, are responsible for their own travel expenses.

To participate in the conference, please send an email to conference organizer, Professor Sheila B. Scheuerman at sscheuerman@charlestonlaw.edu by Friday, August 31, 2012. Please note whether you will be attending the reception on Friday, September 21, in your email. In addition, please include the title of your presentation topic. A short abstract would also be helpful. Please direct any questions, comments or suggestions to Sheila B. Scheuerman at the email address above.

From Legal Scholarship Blog
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Symposium: Call for Papers Climate Change in Former Colonies: Challenges of Property and History 

Climate Change in Former Colonies: Challenges of Property and History

October 12, 2012
Lexington, Virginia


Washington and Lee University School of Law’s Law and History Center, in partnership with Virginia Sea Grant, will host a symposium on Climate Change in the Former Colonies: Challenges of Property and History.

Recognizing the unique impact that the colonial legal experience continues to have on Eastern states, the symposium will focus on the application of legal historical research to contemporary problems and opportunities in the areas of policy-making, property rights, and hazard resilience in coastal communities. Panel presentations and potential topics include:

How the colonial legal experience affects modern property rights and our responsiveness to climate change
Historical and modern property doctrines—particularly nuisance, zoning, and eminent domain—and their relation to current climate change challenges and policies
Changing notions of acceptable land use and natural resources
Environmental hazard resilience policies and opportunities for their enhancement via legal strategies

We are open to suggestions of other related topics.

Publication details:

A collection of papers from the conference will be published as a volume of the Sea Grant Law and Policy Journal. Solid drafts of articles will be due October 1, 2012. We will solicit peer review comments and plan to return those around October 22nd. Final articles will be due November 16th with proofreading and cite checking to follow and publication in December or January.

Funding:

Accommodations and set costs for travel are available. There are also a limited number of scholarships covering travel costs available for graduate students.

Those interested in submitting a paper should email proposals to Dr. Jill Fraley, Director of the Washington and Lee University Center for Law and History, at fraleyj@wlu.edu. Each proposal should include a 200 word abstract, paper title, and author(s) name(s), affiliations. Graduate students seeking scholarships, please include a C.V. and a statement regarding whether or not (and what) funds are available from your home institution. All proposals are due by JUNE 30, 2012.

Please direct any comments or questions about the symposium to Dr. Jill Fraley at fraleyj@wlu.edu.

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From Faculty Law Conference Updates
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