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Call for Papers The 1965 Immigration Act: 50 Years of Race-Neutral (?) Immigration 

The 1965 Immigration Act, also known as the Hart-Celler Act, was a landmark piece of legislation, removing racial barriers that had been a part of federal immigration law since 1790 when the first Congress passed, and George Washington signed, a law restricting citizenship by naturalization to “free white persons.”

The 1965 Immigration Act is arguably the most successful federal civil rights law since Reconstruction. Before 1965, the immigrant stream was overwhelmingly white, and predominantly from the countries of Northern and Western Europe. Since 1965, a supermajority of immigrants have been people of color from Asia and Central and South America. The states of California, Hawaii, New Mexico, and Texas and the District of Columbia are now majority minority, and the United States is expected to become a majority minority nation as a whole by 2043. At the same time, the 1965 Immigration Act was a product of its era. It may have ended formal racial discrimination but it did not eliminate race as a critical and problematic concern in the administration of immigration law. Moreover, it also perpetuated discrimination based on sexual orientation and political opinion. It failed to account for the interests of Mexican migrant workers who had travelled to the United States for generations but were restricted under the new law. It also had the effect of giving Africans few opportunities to come to the United States.

On the occasion of its 50th anniversary, the Immigration and Minority Law sections invite papers to explore the 1965 Immigration Act’s origins; its legal, political, economic, and cultural effects; and its future, including proposals for alternative systems. Two to three papers will be selected from the Call for Papers to be presented at the 2015 AALS Annual Meeting, which will be held in Washington, DC. There is no commitment to publish but both Sections will seek publication opportunities with law reviews.

Eligibility: Full-time faculty members of AALS member law schools are eligible to submit papers. Pursuant to AALS rules, faculty at fee-paid law schools, foreign faculty, adjunct and visiting faculty (without a full-time position at an AALS member law school), graduate students, fellows, and non-law school faculty are not eligible to submit. Please note that all faculty members presenting at the program are responsible for paying their own Annual Meeting registration fee and travel expenses.

Submission: Papers (rather than abstracts) should be submitted to the program committee no later than August 15, 2014, and the papers to be presented will be selected based on an anonymous review by the section’s program committee by September 15. Please send submissions to arguthrie@law.tamu.edu. In order to facilitate anonymous review, please identify yourself and your institutional affiliation only in the cover letter or email accompanying your manuscript, and not in the manuscript itself.

Inquiries: Questions regarding the program may be directed to Huyen Pham at hpham@law.tamu.edu, or Rose Cuison Villazor at rcvillazor@ucdavis.edu

From ImmigrationProf Blog
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Call for Papers: 21st Century Borders: Territorial Conflict and Dispute Resolution  

Date: 13 June 2014 Time: 9.00am - 5.00pm

Venue: Lancaster University

A conference on 21st Century Borders: Territorial Conflict and Dispute Resolution will be held on 13th June 2014 at Lancaster University.

21st Century borders are coming under increasing strain with shifting balances of international power. This was seen most dramatically in the recent Russian annexation of the Crimea and its connected repudiation of uti possidetis that underpinned statehood in the former Soviet Union. In East Asia tensions remain high in sovereignty disputes over islands and maritime delimitation. Renewed attempts to reach a settlement between Israel and Palestine similarly turn on the crucial issue of borders. In addition to these, a number of other states have been involved in long-running boundary conflicts. This conference, organised by the Centre for International Law and Human Rights at Lancaster University Law School will explore the causes and dynamics of contemporary territorial disputes as well as mechanisms to resolve them.

The call for papers is now open and we welcome abstracts for papers of no more than one page from both established researchers and early career academics. Please send your proposals to Dr. James Summers j.summers@lancaster.ac.uk. The deadline for abstracts is 20th April 2014.

Contact: James Summers, j.summers@lancaster.ac.uk

From International Law Reporter
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Call for Proposals: Crosscutting Programs at the 2015 AALS Annual Meeting 

The Association of American Law Schools is seeking proposals for Crosscutting Programs for the 2015 AALS Annual Meeting to be held in Washington, DC from January 2-5, 2015. Crosscutting Programs focus on multi-subject and interdisciplinary subjects with new perspectives on legal issues or the profession. Crosscutting programs attract a wide audience of law faculty teaching a variety of topics.

Successful proposals include innovative approaches to subjects or topics and presentation formats. The program panel would aim to spark conversations among academics both those working inside traditional legal silos and across legal and non-law disciplines. Proposals should not feature a program or subject that could be offered by any particular AALS Section. Additionally, proposals should not conflict with other program topics being presented at the 2015 AALS Annual Meeting. To ensure there is no overlap, the Committee on Special Programs for the 2015 Annual Meeting will evaluate all proposals in light of AALS Section and AALS Committee programs already planned for the 2015 Annual Meeting.

The length of a Crosscutting program is either 1 hour and 45 minutes or can be held during the last afternoon’s 3-hour time slot. Depending on the presentation format selected, we recommend you have one moderator and up to four slots reserved for speakers, and in addition, allot 20 minutes for question and answers from the audience. You may choose to select one speaker from a call for papers, who will not need to be identified by May 12, 2014. Programs might include a non-law school speaker. We recommend a small panel of three so that all panelists can contribute fully and the audience has the opportunity to ask questions.

Program proposals may be submitted by any faculty member with a full-time appointment at an AALS member school.

A proposal of 700 words would include the following information:

Program title;
Detailed description of what the program is trying to accomplish;
Names of the planners of the program and description on how the program idea was generated;
Names of speakers to be invited including their full names and schools with a link to or copy of their curricula vitae. Please describe the contributions each panelist will make to the discussion.
Presentation format of the program;
Program publishing information, if applicable.

The Committee will consider the following:

Is the program focused on multi-subject and interdisciplinary subjects with new perspectives on legal issues or the profession?
Is the format innovative?
Will the program attract a broad audience?
Is there diversity of presenters and of planners? (Diversity in a broad sense: school, perspectives, race, gender, experience, etc.)
Is there a publication coming out of the program?

The following examples of prior Crosscutting Programs can be found on past annual meeting programs here.

Climate Change and Indigenous Peoples: The Intersection of Environmental Law, Natural Resources Development, Water Law, Energy Law, International Law, and Indigenous Law (2013)
The Business of Tax Patents: At the Crossroads of Patent, Tax and Business Law (2013)
The Law and Science of Trustworthy Elections: Facing the Challenges of Internet Voting and Other E-Voting Technologies (2012)

The Committee on Special Programs for the 2015 Annual Meeting will review and notify authors of the selected proposals by June 2014. Speakers are responsible for paying their conference registration fee and travel expenses; for non-law speakers, registration fees are waived.

The AALS welcomes comments and questions about Crosscutting Programs. Questions should be directed to Jane La Barbera AALS Managing Director at crosscutting@aals.org.

Proposals are due May 12, 2014 and should be sent to crosscutting@aals.org

From Washington and Lee Faculty Scholarship Blog

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CALL FOR PAPERS: THE INTERSECTION OF BREAKING BAD AND THE LAW 

Breaking Bad is generally considered one of the greatest dramatic series in television history. Set in Albuquerque, New Mexico, Breaking Bad follows Walter White’s progression from a humble high school chemistry teacher to a vicious methamphetamine kingpin, and introduces us to others caught up in Walter’s devolution, including law enforcement agencies and officials, and his colorful lawyer, Saul Goodman. Breaking Bad implicates a number of significant legal and social issues, including the war on drugs, morality and the law, and ethical attorney behavior, among other critical topics.

The editorial board of the New Mexico Law Review (“NMLR”) is soliciting articles for a special issue dedicated to the exploration of legal issues arising from Breaking Bad, and invites scholars, practitioners, policymakers, and other subject matter experts to contribute to this special issue.

Paper proposals may address any legal topic related to the series, though the board is particularly interested in the following list of legal issues raised in the series:

• The Application of the Fourth Amendment to Drug Crimes Under the New Mexico and/or U.S. Constitutions

• Comparative Analysis of Fourth Amendment Jurisprudence Concerning Drug Crimes

• The War on Drugs: International vs. Domestic Drug Enforcement

• Ethical Duties of Lawyers to Clients Involved in Drugs or Sophisticated Crimes

• Sentencing of Drug Offenses

• Comparative Sentencing Analysis: Drug Crimes and White Collar Crime

• Drug Enforcement in Rural, Urban, and/or Tribal Areas

• Law Enforcement Activity in Media (Fiction)

• Treatment vs. Incarceration for Drug Related Crimes

• Substance Abuse and the Law

• Duty to Rescue

Interested authors should submit an abstract of no more than 1,000 words to nmlrarticles@gmail.com by May 22, 2014.
Publication offers will be made based on an editorial board review of the submitted abstracts. Accepted offers will receive a publication contract from NMLR that will require completed articles be submitted by September 30, 2014.

All inquiries should be directed to nmlrarticles@gmail.com.

[ add comment ] permalink ( 3.1 / 14 )
Call for Proposals: Whiteness as Property 

The Critical Race Studies program at the UCLA School of Law will hold its Eighth Symposium on October 2-4, 2014. This symposium will mark twenty years since Professor Cheryl I. Harris investigated the relationships between concepts of race and property and reflected on how rights in property are contingent on, intertwined with, and conflated with race. That investigation culminated in her groundbreaking article, Whiteness as Property (Harvard Law Review, 1993).

In 2014 we will re-visit the origins of Whiteness as Property as a theoretical frame and site of legal intervention and consider its still unfolding potential for unmasking subordination and provoking social change.

We are inviting submission of proposals. We encourage paper and panel proposals on a wide range of topics including, but not exclusively encompassing, the following:
• Whiteness as Property in relation to discourses about “post-racialism”
• Whiteness as Property and LGBT rights and litigation
• Whiteness as Property and the workplace
• Immigration reform and whiteness as property
• Whiteness as property and teaching pedagogy
• Whiteness as property and gender
• Whiteness as property and state surveillance
• Whiteness as property and gender
• Whiteness as property and the war against terrorism
• Whiteness as property and intergenerational wealth
• Whiteness as property and multiracial identity

To repeat: These themes do not exhaust possible panel or paper presentations. They are simply suggestive of topics that might be engaged.

Each proposal must include a cover page with paper titles, presenters, their affiliations, and a current email contact, along with a maximum two-page c.v. of each presenter. For individual papers, please submit an abstract of no more than 250 words. For panels, submit an overall abstract of no more than 500 words and individual paper descriptions of no more than 250 words each. Please submit materials via email to crs@law.ucla.edu with the subject line: CRS Symposium Proposal.

The deadline for submission is June 15, 2014. Scholars whose submissions are selected for the symposium will be notified no later than July 31, 2014. Submissions will be accepted on a rolling basis, so we highly encourage early submissions.

Link to call and Facebook Page

From Legal Scholarship Blog

[ add comment ] permalink ( 2.8 / 22 )
EPIP 2014 – Belgium 


9th Annual Conference of the EPIP Association
Improving Innovation Systems
European Commission, Brussels, Belgium
September 4-5, 2014

CALL FOR PAPERS

We kindly request that you share this call with your colleagues.
For registration, detailed programme information and paper submissions please visit the
conference website

The European Commission will host the 9th annual conference of The EPIP (EuropeanPolicy for Intellectual Property) association in Brussels, Sept. 4-5, 2014. Scholars andpractitioners interested in the economic, legal, political and managerial aspects of
intellectual property rights are encouraged to attend the conference with or without scientific paper presentation.

The conference will explore how the IP systems in Europe can further growth and innovation. Plenary sessions will be centred on the major theme of ‘Improving Innovation Systems’. Leading economists, renown legal scholars, industry representatives and policy makers will take the floor as keynote speakers to share their
insights and views on recent developments in the innovation and IP landscape.

The plenary sessions will focus on:
Growth, Innovation and Patents
Challenges to European IP Systems
Venture Capital and IP
Furthermore invited sessions will include sessions on:
Copyright Enforcement
Gender and IP
3D printing and IP
Topics of particular interest include:
Governance of IP systems
Growth, innovation and IP protection
IP and measurement of intangible assets
The Unitary Patent and the Unified Patent Court
Patent litigation
IP and competition policy
Trade marks and brands
Trade mark reform in Europe
Copyright in the digital economy
Copyright and incentives for creation
SME business models and IP
Integrated IP strategies
Venture capital and IP
IP and science
Gender and IP

Submission procedure for scientific papers

Full papers as well as extended abstracts may be submitted to the conference website


[ add comment ] permalink ( 3.4 / 15 )
The American Section of the International Association for Philosophy of Law and Social Philosophy -- 2014 biannual conference on the topic of Immigration and Citizenship 

Immigration and Citizenship
October. 9-12, 2014
Chapman University, Orange California
SUBMISSION DEADLINE: August 31, 2014

The American Section of the International Association for Philosophy of Law and Social Philosophy invites submissions for its 2014 biannual conference on the topic of Immigration and Citizenship. All submitted papers are included in the conference. Selected papers from the conference will be published by Springer in a peer reviewed volume of essays.

Link to Call
[ add comment ] permalink ( 3.2 / 13 )
Call for papers: Tax Justice and Human Rights Research Collaboration Symposium 

We invite paper proposals for a Tax Justice and Human Rights Research Collaboration Symposium, to be held at the McGill Faculty of Law, Montreal, Quebec, from Wednesday to Friday, 18-20 June, 2014.

The symposium will explore the fundamental connections between taxation and human rights by providing a forum for collaboration among emerging scholars, established academics, civil society organization representatives, tax justice advocacy groups, tax policy makers, and researchers from around the world. The symposium seeks especially to bring developing-world perspectives into the discourse and to foster scholarly work for dissemination both within and beyond the academic setting.

The plurality of experience, in terms of training, background, country of origin, and area of expertise, will ensure that discussions and activities at the conference will have real-world impact. Indeed, there is a need within the tax-policy world for more cross-pollination between academic researchers and on-the-ground decision-makers. The connections and networking that we envision will take place at this conference should allow for meaningful discussions for years to come.

Paper proposals must be between 300-500 words in length and should be accompanied by a short résumé.

Please submit your proposal to the conference convener Professor Allison Christians, at allison.christians@mcgill.ca.

Deadline for submissions: 30 April 2014. Successful applicants will be notified in early May 2014.

An initial 3-5 page sketch of the paper must be submitted by the end of May for circulation among panelists and feedback from the conference committee, but completed papers are not required; rather, we seek a readiness to collaborate and develop new heuristics for thinking about taxation and human rights.

Conference fees for presenters will be covered by the conference organizers; travel and accommodation bursaries may be available to scholars and tax justice advocates from the Global South in connection with support from the Tax Justice Network, Canadians for Tax Fairness, Halifax Initiative, and other partners.

Visit the Symposium's page on the Stikeman Chair in Tax Law website.

Link to posting
[ 1 comment ] ( 3 views ) permalink ( 2.9 / 14 )
Call for Papers: COMMON LAWS XXth Annual Forum of Young Legal Historians 

2014 will mark not only twenty years of Annual Forums organised by the Association of Young Legal Historians, but also the first time an Annual Forum has been held in a common law jurisdiction. As such, the theme of the XXth Annual Forum— ‘common laws’—invites attention both to the common law legal tradition, and also to
the recurrent themes of legal commonality, harmonisation and integration that have been a feature of the Association’s Annual Forums over the past two decades.

The common law is above all a system built on the accumulation of case law over time. This provides rich materials for legal historians, whether in the form of contextualised case studies, the identification and critique of ‘leading cases’, or an analysis of changing patterns of case law and litigation across history. Case law is, however, by no means unique to the common law tradition. Judicial decisions play a leading role in mixed systems like Scots law, and even in codified civilian systems large domains of the law have historically been the product of case law rather than
legislation; administrative law in France being one notable example. In addition to presentations on the history of the common law itself, the organisers therefore also welcome presentations addressing case law, case studies, and ‘leading cases’ in all
legal systems and across all periods of history.

‘Common law’ can, of course, be understood in more than one sense. In particular, neither the United Kingdom nor the University of Cambridge are isolated from the tradition of the ius commune. English common law is, of course, not the only system of law operating within the UK; and Roman civil law is to this day a foundational aspect of the legal curriculum at the University of Cambridge. In particular, the Regius Professorship of Civil Law has since its establishment in 1540 served as a focus for teaching and research in Roman law in Cambridge. The organisers therefore
welcome presentations addressing the ius commune and the common inheritance of Roman civil law.

Finally, the forum’s theme invites attention to the idea of commonality across legal systems. Within Europe, the EU has served as an obvious focal point for legal harmonisation, as have wider international organisations such as UNIDROIT, UNCITRAL, or the Hague Conference on Private International Law. At the level of
individual states, points of commonality—especially in the field of legislation—can be found in places as diverse as Germany and Japan, or Switzerland and Turkey. Each of these efforts at harmonisation and commonality has a history, and the organisers therefore also invite presentations that address this theme.

Link to full posting
[ add comment ] permalink ( 2.9 / 16 )
The International Society for Public Law – Call for Papers and Panels 

On 26-28 June 2014, in Florence, the European University Institute and NYU-La Pietra will host the Inaugural Conference of the newly established International Society of Public Law (ICON•S).

We invite all our readers to submit proposals for either individual papers, or even more ambitiously, proposals for panels which, if selected, will be presented at the Inaugural Conference. Full details, modules for submitting proposals and for registering for the conference may be found at the society’s website. Registration for the Inaugural Conference includes the first annual membership fee in ICON•S and a free one-year online subscription to I•CON, the International Journal of Constitutional Law.

Why create a new international learned society – are there not enough already?
Why public law – if we typically teach Constitutional Law, Administrative Law, or International Law (and now the much à la mode Global Law)?
And why does the word “comparative” not feature in the title of the new Society? Surely if we bring together constitutionalists from, say, Japan and Canada or administrative lawyers from Italy and Turkey – their common language will be Comparative Law?

The initiative to create an International Society of Public Law emerged from the Editorial Board of I•CON – the International Journal of Constitutional Law. For several years now I•CON has been, both by choice and pursuant to the cartographic reality of the field, much more than a journal of comparative constitutional Law. I•CON has expanded its interests, range of authors, readers, Editorial Board members and, above all, issues covered, to include not only discrete articles in fields such as Administrative Law, Global Constitutional Law, Global Administrative Law and the like, but also – and increasingly so – scholarship that reflects both legal reality and academic perception; scholarship which, in dealing with the challenges of public life and governance, combines elements from all of the above with a good dose of political theory and social science. That kind of remapping of the field is apparent also in EJIL. Its focus remains of course international law, but the meaning of international law today will often include many elements of the above.

True, in our classrooms we still teach ‘con. law’, ‘ad. law’ and ‘int’l law’ separately – with some justification: they retain their reality and heuristically, one has to start somewhere. But in litigation and jurisprudence, lawmaking, and academic reflection, the boundaries between these disciplines and the borders between the national and the transnational – and even global – have become porous, indeed so porous that at times one is actually dealing with an AltNeuland of public law.

I would say that about 20 per cent of the articles submitted to either EJIL and I•CON could be published in both. The boundaries between EJIL and I•CON are, unsurprisingly, equally porous.

We are certainly not announcing the death of, say, Constitutional Law or Administrative Law and the comparative variants of such. But, at a minimum, a full explication and understanding of today’s ‘constitutional’ cannot take place in isolation from other branches of public law or in a context that is exclusively national. The same is true for these other branches too, not least international law. Public law, as a field of knowledge that transcends these dichotomies, thus deserves our renewed intellectual attention. Our German colleagues, who have always had a more holistic approach to public law, may smile with some self-satisfaction.

In the same vein, the divide between law and political science has become porous too. Some of the finest insights on public law come from social scientists deeply cognizant of law; also, is there any legal scholarship that does not make at least some use of the theoretical and empirical understandings and methodologies external to the legal discipline, stricto sensu?

What then of ‘Comparative Law’? Are we announcing the death of the field? Perhaps not of the field, but of the word. The field is flourishing. It is possible to think of the field of Public Law in Chomskyan terms: there is a surface language, which differs from jurisdiction to jurisdiction, but there is also a deeper structure that is common to the phenomenon of public law. It is difficult to find a public law scholar whose work is not ‘comparative’ in some respects: informed by the theoretical discussion of X or Y in another jurisdiction; referring – often by way of contrast, sometimes by way of similarity – to a foreign leading case somewhere else, as in ‘this is the Marbury v. Madison of our legal system’; addressing universal themes of constitutional theory or design; or simply searching for a constitutional ‘best practice’ overseas. Like Monsieur Jourdain who discovered to his astonishment that he was speaking prose, we in the field of public law should not be surprised to discover that in one way or another, we are all comparativists. To limit our new Society to those scholars whose work is explicitly ‘comparative’ would be hugely constricting and would limit many valuable conversations that go well beyond the formally comparative.

The best example of this new cartography may be found in this very issue in our Symposium on the 50th Anniversary of Van Gend en Loos, some articles of which are published in EJIL and others in I•CON .

Learned societies have often been founded to validate the emergence, autonomy, or breakaway of an intellectual endeavour. By contrast, international learned societies are often driven by the realization of intellectual cross-fertilization that can stem from disciplinary ecumenism. ICON·S is both! We believe that there is a compelling case for the establishment of an International Society of Public Law predicated on these sensibilities – a new breakaway field, the content of which respects traditional categories yet rejects an excessive division of intellectual labour that no longer mirrors reality.

As mentioned, the Society will be officially launched at an Inaugural Conference which will take place in Florence, Italy, in June 2014. The European University Institute and NYU School of Law will sponsor this important event – so that we can spread our wings for the first time in the historic Villa Salviati, Villa La Pietra, Villa Schifanoia, the Badia Fiesolana, and the like.

An organizing Committee of both the Society and Conference, presided by Sabino Cassese, is in charge of the Programme and of the Society’s first steps, as is the usual practice with such ‘births’. Once it has taken off, the general membership will elect the officers of the Society who will take charge of its future direction.

The Conference will combine the best practices of the genre. There will be several plenary sessions with invited speakers, commentators and floor discussions on themes that define and reflect the scope of the new Society. But the heart of the event, we sincerely hope, will be the response to this ‘Call for Panels and Papers’. We are expecting a plethora of proposals for individual papers, panels and workshops. Please do not delay in submitting your own proposals.

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