International Law

Call for Papers: International Law as a Mechanism for Justice

Deadline: 

02/28/15

Event Date: 

05/29/15 to 05/30/15

Location name: 

University of Essex School of Law

Organization: 

British Branch of the International Law Association

From its origins, and the interwoven debates and developments emerging from notions of jus gentium and the law of nature, international law has been viewed as a tool for justice. This conference sets out to explore whether it has achieved the aims of its early advocates, posing a number of broad, crosscutting themes:

Conceptual and Theoretical Frameworks of Justice

Panel Proposal- Interest Group on International Environmental Law

Deadline: 

01/25/15

Event Date: 

09/10/15 to 09/12/15

Location name: 

Oslo, Norway

Organization: 

ESIL Annual Conference

The growing complexity and specialisation of international law has given rise to calls for the constitution of courts, tribunals, and chambers operating in specific issue areas. International environmental law is a prominent example of this phenomenon; indeed, that call seemed to have been heeded with the creation of the ICJ’s Environmental Chamber, which seems to be a failed experiment.

Call for Papers: International Law and Domestic Law-Making Processes

Deadline: 

03/27/15

Event Date: 

09/4/15

Location name: 

Basel, Switzerland

Organization: 

The Working Group of Young Scholars in Public International Law

The reality of international law ‘in action’ largely depends on domestic legislators implementing and shaping norms originating at the international level: Domestic parliaments and other law-making bodies undoubtedly play a central role in determining whether or not the promises of international law can be fulfilled.

Call for Papers Urgency and Human Rights

Deadline: 

02/15/15

Event Date: 

05/29/15 to 05/30/15

Location name: 

Nijmegen, NL

Organization: 

The Department of International and European Law of the Law Faculty of the Radboud University Nijmegen, in cooperation with the Seconda Università di Napoli Dipartimento di Giurisprudenza and the Ghent Human Rights Centre

This conference firstly aims to bring together existing scholarship regarding urgency and human rights and discuss the evolving practices in this respect with practitioners. Secondly, its objective is to allow for in-depth discussion of what should be the role of the domestic judiciary when dealing with urgent cases.

Law Beyond the State - Call for Submissions for the 8th Annual Toronto Group Conference

Deadline: 

02/9/15

Event Date: 

05/1/15 to 05/2/15

Location name: 

University of Toronto

Organization: 

Toronto Group for the Study of International, Transnational and Comparative Law

We are pleased to present the 8th Annual Conference of the  Toronto Group for the study of
International, Transnational and Comparative Law. The Toronto Group is a collaborative project
between graduate students at Osgoode Hall Law School and the University of Toronto Faculty of Law.

Call for Papers: The Ideal of Democracy and the Reality of Sovereign Debt

Deadline: 

02/15/15

Event Date: 

01/5/15

Location name: 

Cambridge

In the aftermath of the 2008 bank bailouts, sovereign debt has increased to unprecedented levels. As a result, governments saw their policy room curtailed by the demand for credibility and access to international capital markets. In Greece and Italy, democratically elected officials stepped down from power with the aim of promoting creditworthiness. The Argentine litigation in the United States again brought attention to substantial sway of bondholders over sovereign states.

Call for Papers: Law's Violence

Deadline: 

01/15/15

Event Date: 

09/23/15 to 09/26/15

Location name: 

Sicily, Italy

Organization: 

Pan-European Conference on International Relations

International law is traditionally understood as a juridical means for restraining violence, which disciplines the excesses of state sovereignty. As such, it is imagined as the “other” of power politics which — as human rights activists assert — speaks truth (or justice) to power. International law is both a symptom and cause of the evolution of international society as it has moved beyond power politics as the sole driving force of international affairs. Justifying political decisions in legal terms has become an integral part of foreign policy, and even a ‘key aspect of modern war’.

Call for Papers - Memories of Struggles, Struggles of Memories - 2nd International Workshop on Law and Ideology

Deadline: 

03/1/15

Event Date: 

05/28/15 to 05/29/15

Location name: 

Sarajevo, Bosnia

Organization: 

Faculty of Political Sciences of the University of Sarajevo (Bosnia and Herzegovina) and the Centre for Legal Education and Social Theory of the Faculty of Law, Administration and Economics of the University of Wrocław (Poland)

In his L'histoire comme champ de bataille Enzo Traverso points out that memory as a socially relevant phenomenon appeared widely after 1989. The fall of the Soviet empire and the ensuing defragmentation of the world led to a situation in which a multitude of recollections, hitherto retained only in private, could enter the public space. Social memory became an element of identity and simultaneously an instrument of politics, increasingly encroaching upon the domain of legal discourse.

Call for Papers - Law Beyond the State - 8th Annual Toronto Group Conference

Deadline: 

02/9/15

Event Date: 

05/1/15 to 05/2/15

Location name: 

University of Toronto

Organization: 

Toronto Group

We are pleased to present the 8th Annual Conference of the Toronto Group for the study of
International, Transnational and Comparative Law. The Toronto Group is a collaborative project between graduate students at Osgoode Hall Law School and the University of Toronto Faculty of  Law.

Call for Papers -- In Whose Name? On the Legitimacy of International Adjudication

Deadline: 

01/15/15

Event Date: 

09/10/15 to 09/12/15

Location name: 

Oslo, Norway

Organization: 

ESIL Annual Conference

The Judicialization of International Law - A Mixed Blessing?” Oslo, 10–12 September 2015

In whose name do courts decide? Many domestic courts provide an answer in the
opening words of their decisions. They routinely evoke the source of their legitimacy
right at the start. When it comes to international courts and tribunals, we find nothing
comparable. International courts and tribunals do not say in whose name they speak
the law. What is the source of their legitimacy?

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