Constitutional Law Courses

Qualifying course offerings can change from semester to semester. For a complete list for the current academic year, check the student handbook or contact the Law School Registrar.


View more Course Concentrations | Visit the Course Offerings Search Form
  • Prosecution II , JURI: 5160S, 5161L , Credit Hours: 3 - 6
    Fall Semester. This course teaches the procedural steps involved in the prosecution of a criminal case following a suspect’s arrest.  Students will learn how to evaluate cases and how to wisely exercise “prosecutorial discretion.” Students will also learn practical skills including how to conduct preliminary hearings, grand jury proceedings, and arraignments.

  • Prosecution III , JURI: 5165S, 5166S , Credit Hours: 3 - 6
    Spring Semester. This course teaches the procedural steps involved in the prosecution of a criminal case following a defendant’s not-guilty plea.  Students will learn about jury trials and jury selection. Students will also learn about the search warrant requirement and its “well-recognized exceptions,” identification of suspects, Confrontation Clause, and Right to Counsel.

  • State and Local Government , JURI: 4900 , Credit Hours: 2
    This course explores common principles of state and local government with a strategic focus on key aspects of Georgia law.  The course will combine practical advice with some theory.  Issues addressed include organizational structures of local governments, authority granted to them by the U.S. and Georgia Constitution, and various ways they exercise (or attempt to exercise) their power.  The class may explore these concepts generally and in the context of specific subject areas including but not limited to annexation, home rule, immunity, incorporation, intergovernmental agreements, employment, service delivery strategies, regulatory authority, taxation, and zoning.  This course will introduce students to varied forms of writing and research associated with a professional practice in this area and reflect on professional roles and responsibilities.

  • The Federalist Papers , JURI: 4573 , Credit Hours: 2
    This course focuses on the framing and ratification of the United States Constitution and the role of The Federalist Papers in that process. This class will NOT satisfy the writing requirement.

  • The Press and the Constitution Seminar , JURI: 4197 , Credit Hours: 2
    This seminar will take an in-depth look at the constitutional rights of the "press." Our primary focus will be on the proper interpretation of the First Amendment's guarantee that "Congress shall make no law ... abridging the freedom ... of the press." Topics of discussion will include the history of the Press Clause, the relationship between the Speech Clause and the Press Clause, the definition of the "press" under the Constitution, and the various rights and protections available to the press. Course requirements will include class participation, a presentation, and the completion of a research paper.

  • The Supreme Court: Current Term , JURI: 4585 , Credit Hours: 3
    The Supreme Court of the United States is a unique institution with its own history, personalities and appellate practice. This course examines the Court including an in-depth look at the current nine justices. Students then argue cases from the Court's current docket and write an opinion in a case.

Pages