Criminal Law and Procedure Courses

Qualifying course offerings can change from semester to semester. For a complete list for the current academic year, check the student handbook or contact the Law School Registrar.


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  • Advanced Evidence Seminar , JURI: 5980 , Credit Hours: 2
    Advanced study and writing work on evidence and litigation topics, including subjects like hearsay, experts, final arguments, and motions for a new trial. Involves study and discussion of problem areas and research, writing, and preparation as well as defense of a major paper on a specific litigation problem. Potential paper topics include matters like husband/wife privilege, expert witness standards in federal and Georgia practice, and the limits of closing argument. At the election of the student, the paper can be prepared in a manner which will fulfill the Advanced Writing Requirement of the law school.

  • Appellate Litigation Clinic (Summer Semester) , JURI: 4157S , Credit Hours: 2
    This course picks up where the Appellate Litigation Clinic II leaves off in the spring semester. Students will draft petitions for certiorari in cases where the Circuit Courts of Appeals have denied our clients relief, prepare clemency petitions to the Office of the United States Pardon Attorney when appropriate, and write merits briefs to the Circuit Courts of Appeals and Board of Immigration Appeals for any cases still pending at the appellate court level during the summer term. Overall, the course will teach students the intricacies of appellate practice, including how to write persuasively, how to communicate with clients, and how to learn and follow the applicable procedural rules.

  • Appellate Litigation Clinic I & II , JURI: 4155S, 4156S , Credit Hours: 3 each
    This clinic is designed to train students to be appellate litigators. It is a year-long clinic. Credit for the first semester generally requires participation in the second semester. It is open only to third year law students. Students will get three credits for each semester, and the class will meet for one two-hour seminar per week. The first semester will be pass/fail, and the second semester will have the traditional grading system. The clinic will essentially operate as a small firm and will accept clients with cases before both federal circuit courts of appeals and the Board of Immigration Appeals. Students will work in teams of two or three to review the record of the case, identify the issues that should be raised in the appeal, draft the briefs (both opening brief and reply brief), and do the oral argument if permitted and if oral argument is scheduled. This clinic will require a significant time commitment, particularly around the time that briefs are due and oral arguments are scheduled. Briefing schedules for the different teams will vary. The subject matter of the cases before the Courts of Appeals will vary. Obviously, the cases before the Board of Immigration Appeals will be immigration cases (primarily appeals of deportation orders). Enrollment in the clinic is by application only.

  • Business Crimes , JURI: 5660 , Credit Hours: 2
    This course will cover corporate and individual responsibility for violations of the principal federal statutes regularly used by the government in corporate and white collar crime cases. A variety of offenses will be covered, including conspiracy, mail and securities fraud, obstruction of justice, false statements, bribery and environmental crimes. The course will also cover organizational compliance programs as a means of preventing violations of the law and mitigating organizational legal liability.

  • Capital Assistance Project , JURI: 5310S , Credit Hours: 2
    Students work with attorneys at agencies which defend individuals charged with capital offenses. In the classroom component, students will discuss work experiences, examine current issues in capital punishment, and evaluate special problems which confront the attorney defending a capital case.

  • Capital Punishment , JURI: 5840 , Credit Hours: 3
    An in-depth examination of the legal and social issues surrounding capital punishment. Surveys a variety of legal issues in areas of criminal law and procedure, constitutional law and ethics which confront attorneys in capital cases. The course will encourage students to synthesize the social and legal facets to objectively evaluate the complex issues involved in capital punishment.

  • Children in the Legal System , JURI: 4750 , Credit Hours: 3
    This course will focus on the legal status, rights, and disabilities of children in the American legal system. Initial emphasis will be on the condition of children in America, the development of the juvenile and family courts, and the development of children's constitutional rights in the home, in school, and in public. Significant attention will then be given to issues concerning child welfare, medical treatment, and juvenile delinquency. Other subjects that may be covered include status-based offenses and the representation of children. Grading will be based heavily on class participation in addition to a final examination.

  • Constitutional Law I , JURI: 4180 , Credit Hours: 3
    This course addresses the meaning and impact of the Constitution of the United States, particularly with regard to the subjects of federalism, separation of powers, the judicial function and due process of law.

  • Constitutional Law II , JURI: 4190 , Credit Hours: 3
    This course focuses on constitutional protections of liberty and equality apart from protections that stem from principles of substantive and procedural due process. Subjects typically covered in the course include the Contract Clause, equal protection, freedom of expression, the right to free exercise of religion and the prohibition of laws respecting an establishment of religion.

  • Constitutional Litigation , JURI: 4420 , Credit Hours: 3
    Addresses a number of issues arising in damages actions brought under 42 U.S.C. Section 1983, which authorizes a cause of action against persons who violate constitutional rights under color of state law. Topics covered may include distinction between common law and constitutional torts, scope of governmental liability, official immunity, damages, causation, state court suits, procedural defenses, attorney's fees, and meaning of "under color of." Suits against federal officers, under principle established in Bivens v. Six Federal Narcotics Agents, may also be discussed.

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