Criminal Law and Procedure Courses

Qualifying course offerings can change from semester to semester. For a complete list for the current academic year, check the student handbook or contact the Law School Registrar.


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  • Prosecution I , JURI: 5150S , Credit Hours: 2
    This course teaches how the 4th and 5th Amendments guide and limit law enforcement officers when they search or seize citizens and when they conduct pre-arrest interviews or post-arrest (custodial) interrogations. Students will also learn practical skills including how to conduct a motion to suppress hearing and a Jackson-Denno hearing.

  • Prosecution II , JURI: 5160S, 5161L , Credit Hours: 3 - 6
    Fall Semester. This course teaches the procedural steps involved in the prosecution of a criminal case following a suspect’s arrest.  Students will learn how to evaluate cases and how to wisely exercise “prosecutorial discretion.” Students will also learn practical skills including how to conduct preliminary hearings, grand jury proceedings, and arraignments.

  • Prosecution III , JURI: 5165S, 5166S , Credit Hours: 3 - 6
    Spring Semester. This course teaches the procedural steps involved in the prosecution of a criminal case following a defendant’s not-guilty plea.  Students will learn about jury trials and jury selection. Students will also learn about the search warrant requirement and its “well-recognized exceptions,” identification of suspects, Confrontation Clause, and Right to Counsel.

  • Selected Topics in International Criminal Law , JURI: 5595 , Credit Hours: 1
    The course will examine key issues and dilemmas relating to International Criminal Law (ICL). It will begin by surveying both ICL’s development in recent times as well as its substantive law. It will then explore unique aspects of ICL, including: the collective nature of the crimes, the difficulty of investigating such crimes, and the difficulty to enforce ICL. Various doctrines exclusive to ICL will be examined in order to demonstrate how ICL’s norms have been shaped by its exceptional features. The course will conclude by refuting the myth that ICL was ‘born’ at Nuremberg, by uncovering ICL’s centuries-long forgotten history and establishing its current relevancy.

  • Tax Crimes , JURI: 5611 , Credit Hours: 2
    Criminal tax investigations and prosecutions; constitutional defenses to the compulsory production of evidence; attorney-client privilege, confidentiality and other defenses available to taxpayers and third parties.

  • Transnational Criminal Law , JURI: 4273 , Credit Hours: 3
    This course concerns crimes that, though ordinarily domestic, become “transnational” when some aspect crosses national borders. To be studied: extraterritorial jurisdiction; obligations of law enforcement officers operating overseas; substantive law of crimes like trafficking, public corruption, money laundering, and terrorism; and procedural matters like extradition, rendition, evidence gathering, and judgment-enforcement.

  • Whistleblower Litigation Seminar , JURI: 5644 , Credit Hours: 2
    This seminar focuses on the major Federal whistleblower statute -- the civil False Claims Act (FCA) -- which in recent years has resulted in billions of dollars of recoveries for the U.S. Government and various states, and huge rewards for the private whistleblowers instigating these cases. The FCA creates a unique partnership among private plaintiffs, their counsel, and Government lawyers, and is spawning an ever expanding number of Federal and state investigations. We will examine the evolution of the FCA from the Civil War era through its modern amendments, and the key substantive and strategic issues in pursuing and defending FCA cases today. The course will also briefly review the new whistleblower reward program at the Securities and Exchange Commission and the recently enhanced program at the Internal Revenue Service. This class is limited to 20 students.

  • White Collar Prosecution , JURI: 5661 , Credit Hours: 2
    This course is designed to give students an introduction to economic and political crimes associated under the label of “white collar crime” in Georgia, including conspiracy, theft, fraud, racketeer influenced and corrupt organizations (RICO), money laundering, computer and cyber-crimes, perjury and false statements, securities fraud, fraud upon financial institutions, and parallel non-criminal procedures associated with white collar crimes.  This course will also provide students a practical and substantive understanding of various investigative tools and techniques, as well as prosecutorial and defensive strategies, utilized in Georgia inthese types of cases.

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