General Legal Interest Courses

Qualifying course offerings can change from semester to semester. For a complete list for the current academic year, check the student handbook or contact the Law School Registrar.


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  • Mass Tort Seminar , JURI: 5790 , Credit Hours: 3
    This seminar focuses on the legal problems and issues associated with the unique, growing phenomenon of mass torts, e.g., the B.P. Oil Spill, the 9/11 litigation, tobacco, Agent Orange, Dalkon Shield, breast implants, asbestos personal injury litigation, etc. We will examine such issues as consolidation of state and federal litigation in one forum, judicial determination of who should appropriately manage the litigation for both plaintiffs and defendants, how courts determine legal causation, strategic and ethical considerations for plaintiffs and defendants, strategies for litigation funding, alternatives to judicial resolution, and issues associated with Congressional intervention. This class will explore the overriding question of whether the courts can dispense individual justice in cases involving thousands of litigants. Course requirements will include writing a substantial research paper as well as actively participating in class discussion.

  • Military Law , JURI: 4390 , Credit Hours: 2
    The course will focus on the system of military justice in the United States, and its sources of authority under the U.S. Constitution, the Uniform Code of Military Justice (UCMJ), and the Manual for Courts-Martial (MCM). The course will also address the history of military justice in the United States and particularly the UCMJ since its enactment in 1951; the complementary relationship between military discipline and the UCMJ; scope of military jurisdiction; the different types of crimes established in the UCMJ; military trial practice and procedure , including a comparison between the evidentiary and procedural rules under the UCMJ/MCM and the civilian federal courts; the appellate courts established under the UCMJ; the role of the military lawyer and the organization and role of the several Judge Advocate General departments within DoD; the role of the military commander under the UCMJ; significant military cases reaching the U.S. Supreme Court and other federal courts; discussion of the use of military commissions in the Global War on Terror and a comparative analysis of military justice systems of other nations.

  • Public Interest Practicum , JURI: 5690S , Credit Hours: 3
    Designed to teach students to discover what peoples' needs are, to be able as lawyers to summon community's resources for meeting those needs, and to determine what lawyers can do to insure the community's services are in place and functioning. Students will be required to work with both service institutions and individuals who are the clients of those institutions. They will be assigned to cases and graded on their success in solving the problems raised.

  • Race and Law , JURI: 4821 , Credit Hours: 3
    This course takes a Critical Race Theory perspective on legislative and judicial treatment of racial issues in the United States. The reading emphasizes the historical treatment of racial minorities, starting with Native Americans and the beginnings of racially defined slavery and continuing through the post civil war constitutional amendments, legally enforced racial segregation, the civil rights movement, and the post-civil rights jurisprudence of the modern era. The classroom approach is a mixture of lecture and discussion.

  • Sociology of Law , JURI: 4820 , Credit Hours: 3
    Characterized by a scientific rather than normative emphasis, legal sociology focuses on empirical patterns of legal behavior, such as initiation and winning of law suits, origins and content of rules, and the development of legal institutions. Most literature has addressed case-level variation and the course will reflect this. But instead of analyzing cases in terms of the applicable rules and policies, lectures and readings will invoke the social characteristics of participants (e.g., social ties, status, marginality, reputation and organizational affiliations) to predict and explain case outcomes. Sociological techniques by which social differentials in cases (discrimination) might be minimized will also be studied. Modern American materials will be emphasized.

  • Solo & Small Firm Practice , JURI: 4625 , Credit Hours: 2 (3L students only)
    This course provides a roadmap for the new lawyer to establish a solo law practice or to join with other lawyers in creating or expanding a small law firm. This course is limited to 3L students only.

  • Supervised Research , JURI: 5190 , Credit Hours: 2
    Supervised Research involves an in-depth written analysis of a legal issue under close faculty tutoring and supervision. It requires significant legal research, original thinking and analysis, and must produce final paper of a kind and quality similar to that found in law review articles.

  • Topics in Legal History , JURI: 4875 , Credit Hours: 2
    Examination of the role of law and legal institutions in shaping politics, society, culture, and economics in American History. 

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