Government, Public Policy and Regulation Courses

Qualifying course offerings can change from semester to semester. For a complete list for the current academic year, check the student handbook or contact the Law School Registrar.


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  • Food & Drug Law , JURI: 5635 , Credit Hours: 2
    This course provides an overview of laws and regulations governing development, manufacturing, and commercial distribution of drugs, biologic, medical device products, and animal health products and how they relate to the pharmaceutical, biotechnology, and medical device industry. This includes domestic regulatory requirements and various regulatory agencies and their jurisdiction.

  • Foundations of U.S. Privacy Law and Practice , JURI: 5589 , Credit Hours: 1
    This seminar surveys the legal concepts surrounding privacy in the U.S. private sector, with particular emphasis placed on offering students a real-world view concerning the practice of privacy law at the corporate level.

  • Franchise Law , JURI: 4940 , Credit Hours: 2
    This course will introduce students to the franchise business model, with emphasis on the practical aspects of franchising.  The topics it will cover include the franchise regulatory system in the U.S., including laws governing franchise sales and disclosures and franchise relationship issues; and tangential areas, which will include a brief look at trademark and other intellectual property subjects, antitrust, commercial contract issues,  alternative forms of dispute resolution (mediation and arbitration), and common law contract and tort issues, as well as international franchising.  The course will also include opportunities to address hypothetical situations based on actual events and will emphasize policy considerations relating to franchise activities.

  • Georgia State and Local Government , JURI: 4905 , Credit Hours: 3
    This course explores principles of state and local government in Georgia.  Issues include organizational structures of local governments and the authority granted to by the U.S. and Georgia Constitutions.  Writing and research associated with practice in this area, and reflection on professional roles and responsibilities are elements of the course. This course meets the practical skills requirement. Students who have taken JURI 4900 are not eligible to take this course.

  • Higher Education Law , JURI: 5783 , Credit Hours: 3
    The course will examine the constitutional, statutory, administrative, and common-law principles that shape the structure, identity, and character of American public and private colleges and universities, including academic freedom, the rights and responsibilities of students and faculty, issues of identity and access, shared governance, accreditation and regulation.

  • Housing Law , JURI: 5540 , Credit Hours: 3
    The course covers selected issues in housing law and policy, drawn from both the private and public sectors. The course accommodates a number of different perspectives and interest areas, including non-legal disciplines related to housing. The course will be run seminar style, with assigned readings, directed discussion, and guest lectures. Each student will prepare a major research paper on a topic related to housing and will make an oral presentation of the paper to the class. There is no final exam.

  • Immigration Law , JURI: 5890 , Credit Hours: 3
    This course will examine American immigration law and policy. Topics considered include source and scope of Congressional power to regulate immigration; procedures for entry, exclusion, and deportation; refugees and asylum; current immigration law reform; and the role of states in regulating migrants. This course is intended both for those who are considering immigration law as a career and for those who want a general introduction to an important area of law that intersects with many areas of practice, including administrative, criminal, family, employment, and international.

  • Insurance Law , JURI: 4630 , Credit Hours: 2
    This is an experiential class based on a survey of liability and first party insurance coverage issues. The course will include a review of current and recurring issues in liability insurance, including commercial general liability insurance, professional liability insurance, directors and officers insurance, and umbrella and excess insurance. Within this context, coverage for subjects such as environmental claims, construction defect claims, and claims against corporate officers and directors for breach of fiduciary duty and mismanagement will be discussed. The course will also include a review of current and recurring issues under first party property policies. Within this general context, the course will also survey emerging insurance coverage issues, such as coverage for cyber liability claims and claims related to alleged climate change. To provide experiential learning, cases will be assigned in advance to be argued by teams of opposing counsel, one team representing the insurer and one team representing the insured. The class will be graded as follows: 10 percent based on class participation in arguing a pre-assigned case (this will be based on the substance of the argument and not on presentation skills); 40 percent based on a mid-term assignment to write a reservation of rights letter or coverage memorandum based on a written problem (which will include a self-evaluation component), and 50 percent on a one hour open book final exam.

  • International Criminal Law , JURI: 4270 , Credit Hours: 3
    Examined will be the development and jurisprudence of international criminal law: its origins in post-World War II Nuremberg and Tokyo war crimes tribunals; its evolution in post-Cold War tribunals for the former Yugoslavia, Rwanda, Sierra Leone, Cambodia, and Lebanon; and its siblings, noncriminal efforts like truth commissions. A focus will be the 10-year-old permanent International Criminal Court: its core crimes and ways persons may be held liable or defend against liability; the roles of actors including ICC prosecutors and defenders, judges, victims, partner organizations like NATO and the United Nations, and countries that belong to the ICC; and the relationship between the ICC and nonmember countries like the United States.

  • International Environmental Law , JURI: 5750 , Credit Hours: 3
    Interdisciplinary introduction to international environmental law and policy, focusing on how international environmental regimes emerge, develop and influence behavior. Selected case studies on topics such as acid rain, global warming, whaling, deforestation, and trade in endangered species.

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