Government, Public Policy and Regulation Courses

Qualifying course offerings can change from semester to semester. For a complete list for the current academic year, check the student handbook or contact the Law School Registrar.


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  • Labor Law , JURI: 4760 , Credit Hours: 3
    Examines National Labor Relations Act, focusing on history and evolution of labor relations laws, union organizational activity, collective bargaining, economic weapons, the duty of fair representation, and federalism and labor relations.

  • Laws of War , JURI: 4645 , Credit Hours: 3
    Examined in this course will be laws and customs intended to regulate war - not only when and whether law permits resort to armed conflict, but also national and international legal rules and regimes governing how war is to be waged and when actors may be sanctioned for violating those rules.

  • Legislation and Statutory Interpretation , JURI: 4880 , Credit Hours: 3
    This basic survey course has two major goals. First, though we think of ourselves as a common law country, most of our laws come from statutes. Lawyers, in whatever kind of law practice they engage, find themselves confronted regularly with statutes which must be made sense of. Therefore, the ability to read, interpret, and argue from statutes is a fundamental skill for any attorney. The first goal of this course, then, is to introduce the practical skills and basic theory for working with statutes. Second, and more broadly, students may have noticed that "law school" might be better described as "court school." That is, there is much education about courts, judges, and judicial process, but far less about how most of our laws are made. The second goal of this course, then, is to explore the legislative process and to begin to understand how the three branches of the federal government (and most states, as well) speak to one another. The course will combine standard law school teaching methods (lecture and Socratic discussion) with interactive classroom exercises. Most of the course grade will be based on an exam, but classroom engagement and perhaps one or two (very very short) written assignments will factor in as well.

  • Military Law , JURI: 4390 , Credit Hours: 2
    The course will focus on the system of military justice in the United States, and its sources of authority under the U.S. Constitution, the Uniform Code of Military Justice (UCMJ), and the Manual for Courts-Martial (MCM). The course will also address the history of military justice in the United States and particularly the UCMJ since its enactment in 1951; the complementary relationship between military discipline and the UCMJ; scope of military jurisdiction; the different types of crimes established in the UCMJ; military trial practice and procedure , including a comparison between the evidentiary and procedural rules under the UCMJ/MCM and the civilian federal courts; the appellate courts established under the UCMJ; the role of the military lawyer and the organization and role of the several Judge Advocate General departments within DoD; the role of the military commander under the UCMJ; significant military cases reaching the U.S. Supreme Court and other federal courts; discussion of the use of military commissions in the Global War on Terror and a comparative analysis of military justice systems of other nations.

  • Patent Law , JURI: 4920 , Credit Hours: 3
    This course addresses the basics of obtaining and enforcing U.S. patent protection for useful inventions. We consider how the patent laws foster innovation through the grant of exclusionary rights to inventors by undertaking a detailed examination of both the substantive requirements for patentability (utility, novelty, and nonobviousness) and the requirements defining an adequate disclosure of the invention (written description, enablement, and claim definiteness). We also explore the complementary implementation roles played by the U.S. Patent & Trademark Office, on the one hand, and the federal courts (especially the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit) on the other. NOTE: One cannot take the IP Survey (JURI 5050) after having taken any two of the following courses: Copyright Law (JURI 4430), Patent Law (JURI 4920), or Trademark Law (JURI 4930). If the IP Survey course is taken first, any or all three of the advanced intellectual property courses can be taken.

  • Patent Prosecution & Procedure , JURI: 4923 , Credit Hours: 2
    This drafting course studies how to write and prosecute a United States patent application. With numerous drafting exercises, including the drafting of claims and arguments in response to Office Actions from the US Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO), the course both introduces students to common issues arising during patent prosecution and equips students with basic strategies to deal with those issues. The course also explores patent infringement analysis and opinion letter work in which patent lawyers routinely engage. It is not formal preparation for the USPTO patent bar.

  • Poverty and Financial Law , JURI: 5465 , Credit Hours: 2
    This seminar will examine the history and current regulatory structure of financial services to the poor. It will examine the legal framework around the fringe banking sector, the credit union and savings and loan movements, postal banking, and other poverty-related financial initiatives.

  • Public International Law , JURI: 4640 , Credit Hours: 3
    This introductory course will examine the doctrine, theory, and evolution of International Law. Once focused narrowly on relations between nation-states, the field now encompasses myriad legal norms and mechanisms regulating the global activities not only of states, but also of human beings, corporations, and intergovernmental and nongovernmental organizations.

  • Refugee & Asylum Law , JURI: 5894 , Credit Hours: 3
    The world’s refugees – persons forced to flee home countries – topped 15 million in 2014. This course will examine laws and policies governing forced migration. To be studied: international and U.S. legal systems and institutions; substantive, procedural, and evidentiary aspects of an asylum claim; causes; and trafficking and other refugee experiences.

  • Securities Litigation and Enforcement , JURI: 5430 , Credit Hours: 3
    This course examines private, SEC, and criminal enforcement of the federal securities laws. Topics considered include fraud on the market, market manipulation, international reach of the fraud provisions, and securities arbitration, as well as developments under the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act and the Sarbanes-Oxley Act. This course is altogether distinct from, and does not presuppose knowledge of, the course in securities regulation.

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