Health Law and Policy Courses

Qualifying course offerings can change from semester to semester. For a complete list for the current academic year, check the student handbook or contact the Law School Registrar.


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  • Health Care Fraud and Abuse , JURI: 5621 , Credit Hours: 2
    This course meets the substantial writing requirement with permission of the instructor only. The course will examine federal and state laws imposing civil and criminal penalties on health care providers, with special emphasis on the federal False Claims Act, the Anti-Kickback Statute, and the Physician Self-Referral (Stark) Law. Civil Monetary Penalty and exclusion laws, application of traditional federal white-collar criminal statutes to health care, and state fraud and abuse laws also will be discussed. Ample experiential learning opportunities will be provided through drafting assignments, mock client advising problems, and guest lectures, including state and federal regulatory and law enforcement agencies, practicing attorneys, and health care industry executives.

  • Health Law Seminar , JURI: 5625 , Credit Hours: 2
    This seminar will examine the central issues faced by health care attorneys, with emphasis on in-house counsel who undertake to represent hospitals and health systems in the United States. Among the topics examined will be the statutory and regulatory frameworks designed to reduce and penalize fraud and abuse of the Federal health care programs. Statutory frameworks to be studied will include: the Federal Physician Self-Referral Prohibition, known as the Stark Law that provides civil penalties against physicians that refer patients to entities to which they have a financial interest; the Federal Anti-Kickback Statute that provides civil and criminal penalties for anyone that pays or receives kick-backs for health care referrals; and the Civil Monetary Penalties Act as they relate to health reimbursement and business development. Also considered will be the Emergency Medical Treatment and Active Labor Act, EMTALA, known as the patient anti-dumping law; the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act, HIPAA; and Disproportionate Share Hospital (DSH) programs.

  • Insurance Law , JURI: 4630 , Credit Hours: 2
    This is an experiential class based on a survey of liability and first party insurance coverage issues. The course will include a review of current and recurring issues in liability insurance, including commercial general liability insurance, professional liability insurance, directors and officers insurance, and umbrella and excess insurance. Within this context, coverage for subjects such as environmental claims, construction defect claims, and claims against corporate officers and directors for breach of fiduciary duty and mismanagement will be discussed. The course will also include a review of current and recurring issues under first party property policies. Within this general context, the course will also survey emerging insurance coverage issues, such as coverage for cyber liability claims and claims related to alleged climate change. To provide experiential learning, cases will be assigned in advance to be argued by teams of opposing counsel, one team representing the insurer and one team representing the insured. The class will be graded as follows: 10 percent based on class participation in arguing a pre-assigned case (this will be based on the substance of the argument and not on presentation skills); 40 percent based on a mid-term assignment to write a reservation of rights letter or coverage memorandum based on a written problem (which will include a self-evaluation component), and 50 percent on a one hour open book final exam.

  • Intellectual Property Survey , JURI: 5050 , Credit Hours: 3
    This course provides an introduction to the four primary types of intellectual property protection: copyright, patent, trademark, and trade secret. Students gain a basic understanding of the various grounds for and limitations of such protections. This course serves as both an introduction to the field for those anticipating further study and a survey of the area for those planning to focus on a different area of law. NOTE: One cannot take the IP Survey (JURI 5050) after having taken any two of the following courses: Copyright Law (JURI 4430), Patent Law (JURI 4920), or Trademark Law (JURI 4930). If the IP Survey course is taken first, any or all three of the advanced intellectual property courses can be taken.

  • Law & Medicine , JURI: 5623 , Credit Hours: 3
    Focuses on the relationship between health care providers and patients. Topics include: the treatment relationship, professional liability, licensing, access to care (including EMTALA), quality of care, privacy and confidentiality (including HIPAA), and informed consent.

  • Law & Science Seminar , JURI: 5579 , Credit Hours: 2
    Emerging technologies present an intrinsic challenge as new discoveries frequently extend the beyond the reality anticipated by existing laws and regulations. The use of science in the courtroom or legislation (e.g., climate change) is often problematic as parties put forth competing claims as to what the law should regard as valid scientific evidence. Further, sometimes scientists view the law as a prior restraint to research and development (e.g, trial of Galileo, "Scopes monkey trial," ban on human cloning) and in other instances they may view it as driving innovation (patent laws, academic technology transfer policies). In summary, this seminar will examine the complicated relationship between law and science on both applied and philosophical grounds. Students are required to write and present a research paper relevant to this seminar as well as actively participate in classroom discussion.

  • Mass Tort Litigation , JURI: 4143 , Credit Hours: 3
    This course focuses on the legal problems and issues associated with the unique, growing phenomenon of mass torts, e.g., the B.P. Oil Spill, the 9/11 litigation, tobacco, Agent Orange, Dalkon Shield, breast implants, asbestos personal injury litigation, Holocaust litigation etc. We will examine such issues as consolidation of state and federal litigation in one forum, judicial determination of who should appropriately manage the litigation for both plaintiffs and defendants, how courts determine legal causation, strategic and ethical considerations for plaintiffs and defendants, strategies for litigation funding, alternatives to judicial resolution, and issues associated with Congressional intervention. This class will explore the overriding question of whether the courts can dispense individual justice in cases involving thousands of litigants.

  • Medical Malpractice , JURI: 5590 , Credit Hours: 1
    A nuts and bolts approach to medical malpractice law and litigation in Georgia. Taught by practicing attorneys, plaintiff and defense perspectives are offered. While the focus is on substantive law, the procedural aspects of such cases are also covered.

  • Patent Law , JURI: 4920 , Credit Hours: 3
    This course addresses the basics of obtaining and enforcing U.S. patent protection for useful inventions. We consider how the patent laws foster innovation through the grant of exclusionary rights to inventors by undertaking a detailed examination of both the substantive requirements for patentability (utility, novelty, and nonobviousness) and the requirements defining an adequate disclosure of the invention (written description, enablement, and claim definiteness). We also explore the complementary implementation roles played by the U.S. Patent & Trademark Office, on the one hand, and the federal courts (especially the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit) on the other. NOTE: One cannot take the IP Survey (JURI 5050) after having taken any two of the following courses: Copyright Law (JURI 4430), Patent Law (JURI 4920), or Trademark Law (JURI 4930). If the IP Survey course is taken first, any or all three of the advanced intellectual property courses can be taken.

  • Public Health Law , JURI: 5622 , Credit Hours: 3
    This course offers an overview of Public Health Law. The course begins by defining public health law with historic, contemporary and international comparative law-policy perspectives, discusses the government entities most involved in public health domestically and internationally, and then surveys a range of applications. Coverage encompasses reproductive health, vaccination, biodefense, integration of genomics (study of gene function) and population genetics into public health policy and practice, and international public health.

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