Intellectual Property and Technology Law Courses

Qualifying course offerings can change from semester to semester. For a complete list for the current academic year, check the student handbook or contact the Law School Registrar.


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  • Bioethics , JURI: 5585 , Credit Hours: 3
    Examines legal, ethical, and social problems generated by advances in health, medicine and biotechnology. Some of the issues covered include human cloning and stem cell research, gene-based therapies, death and dying, reproductive technologies, experimentation with human subjects, and societal limits on scientific developments.

  • Copyright Law , JURI: 4430 , Credit Hours: 2
    Focus is upon various methods to protect literary, musical, and artistic work under law of copyright. Copyright is a statutory subject based upon Copyright Act of 1909 and its amendments and Copyright Act of 1976. The course deals with what can be copyrighted, infringement actions, rights enjoyed by the copyright proprietor, jurisdiction and various remedies. Students in the class of 2013 and later are encouraged to take the IP Survey course before taking this course. NOTE: One cannot take the IP Survey (JURI 5050) after having taken any two of the following courses: Copyright Law (JURI 4430), Patent Law (JURI 4920), or Trademark Law (JURI 4930). If the IP Survey course is taken first, any or all three of the advanced intellectual property courses can be taken.

  • Cybercrime , JURI: 5584 , Credit Hours: 3
    This course will explore how changes in technology challenge the law’s traditional approaches to combating criminal activity, enforcing criminal law, and balancing the rights of the public against the demands of justice. Topics will include electronic surveillance, the Fourth Amendment and technology, cybersecurity, hacking, cyberbullying, criminal copyright law, personal and data privacy, jurisdiction, and civil liberties online. No technical background is necessary. The primary evaluative mechanism for this course will be an examination.

  • Entertainment Law , JURI: 5570 , Credit Hours: 2
    Students will learn about the fundamental elements of entertainment law, including: (a) basics of copyright, trademark, and right of publicity law; (b) how intellectual property rights are transferred and acquired; and, (c) how relationships within the entertainment industry are structured.

  • Intellectual Property Survey , JURI: 5050 , Credit Hours: 3
    This course provides an introduction to the four primary types of intellectual property protection: copyright, patent, trademark, and trade secret. Students gain a basic understanding of the various grounds for and limitations of such protections. This course serves as both an introduction to the field for those anticipating further study and a survey of the area for those planning to focus on a different area of law. NOTE: One cannot take the IP Survey (JURI 5050) after having taken any two of the following courses: Copyright Law (JURI 4430), Patent Law (JURI 4920), or Trademark Law (JURI 4930). If the IP Survey course is taken first, any or all three of the advanced intellectual property courses can be taken.

  • Internet Law , JURI: 5583 , Credit Hours: 2
    Introduction to the legal and policy issues raised by computers and the Internet. This course will explore how the Internet’s digital and networked environment changes the nature of regulation, unleashes innovation, and refashions the relationships among public and private actors. Topics will include jurisdiction, free speech, privacy, intellectual property, e-commerce, and internet governance. No technical background is necessary.

  • Patent Law , JURI: 4920 , Credit Hours: 3
    This course addresses the basics of obtaining and enforcing U.S. patent protection for useful inventions. We consider how the patent laws foster innovation through the grant of exclusionary rights to inventors by undertaking a detailed examination of both the substantive requirements for patentability (utility, novelty, and nonobviousness) and the requirements defining an adequate disclosure of the invention (written description, enablement, and claim definiteness). We also explore the complementary implementation roles played by the U.S. Patent & Trademark Office, on the one hand, and the federal courts (especially the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit) on the other. NOTE: One cannot take the IP Survey (JURI 5050) after having taken any two of the following courses: Copyright Law (JURI 4430), Patent Law (JURI 4920), or Trademark Law (JURI 4930). If the IP Survey course is taken first, any or all three of the advanced intellectual property courses can be taken.

  • Patent Prosecution & Procedure , JURI: 4923 , Credit Hours: 2
    This drafting course studies how to write and prosecute a United States patent application. With numerous drafting exercises, including the drafting of claims and arguments in response to Office Actions from the US Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO), the course both introduces students to common issues arising during patent prosecution and equips students with basic strategies to deal with those issues. The course also explores patent infringement analysis and opinion letter work in which patent lawyers routinely engage. It is not formal preparation for the USPTO patent bar.

  • Trademark Law , JURI: 4930 , Credit Hours: 2
    Acquisition of trademark rights, registration, infringement, false advertising, dilution, remedies, and international aspects of trademark law. Students in the class of 2013 and later are encouraged to take the IP Survey course before taking this course. NOTE: One cannot take the IP Survey (JURI 5050) after having taken any two of the following courses: Copyright Law (JURI 4430), Patent Law (JURI 4920), or Trademark Law (JURI 4930). If the IP Survey course is taken first, any or all three of the advanced intellectual property courses can be taken.

  • Visual Arts, Cultural Heritage, and the Law , JURI: 5575 , Credit Hours: 2
     This course explores contemporary legal, ethical, and policy issues involved in the acquisition, ownership, and disposition of works of art. It tackles diverse issues by examining the complex roles of multiple participants, including from the transactional perspective of an attorney representing an art collector.  The international movement of art in times of war and peace and the preservation and protection of art as a form of cultural heritage are important themes in the course.  There is no formal prerequisites for the course beyond the first year curriculum. The course includes several drafting assignments (often done in 2-3 person teams) and an in-class final.