International and Comparative Law Courses

Qualifying course offerings can change from semester to semester. For a complete list for the current academic year, check the student handbook or contact the Law School Registrar.


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  • Immigration Law , JURI: 5890 , Credit Hours: 3
    This course will examine American immigration law and policy. Topics considered include source and scope of Congressional power to regulate immigration; procedures for entry, exclusion, and deportation; refugees and asylum; current immigration law reform; and the role of states in regulating migrants. This course is intended both for those who are considering immigration law as a career and for those who want a general introduction to an important area of law that intersects with many areas of practice, including administrative, criminal, family, employment, and international.

  • International Arbitration , JURI: 4720 , Credit Hours: 2
    This course will examine the legal regime governing international commercial arbitration. Topics will include the enforcement of arbitration agreements, arbitral procedure and the enforcement of arbitral awards. The course also will consider how to draft arbitral clauses.

  • International Business Transactions , JURI: 4675 , Credit Hours: 3
    This course will examine the legal regime governing a variety of international business transactions. Topics include international sales, international finance, and anti-corruption legislation.

  • International Civil Litigation , JURI: 5810 , Credit Hours: 3
    Globalization has increased the frequency of transboundary civil disputes, whether between two companies like Microsoft and Sony or in business dealings with sovereigns like China. More than ever, the next generation of lawyers needs to know the law governing topics such as personal jurisdiction over foreign companies, forum nonconveniens, discovery in international disputes, forum selection clauses and foreign judgments.

  • International Criminal Law , JURI: 4270 , Credit Hours: 3
    Examined will be the development and jurisprudence of international criminal law: its origins in post-World War II Nuremberg and Tokyo war crimes tribunals; its evolution in post-Cold War tribunals for the former Yugoslavia, Rwanda, Sierra Leone, Cambodia, and Lebanon; and its siblings, noncriminal efforts like truth commissions. A focus will be the 10-year-old permanent International Criminal Court: its core crimes and ways persons may be held liable or defend against liability; the roles of actors including ICC prosecutors and defenders, judges, victims, partner organizations like NATO and the United Nations, and countries that belong to the ICC; and the relationship between the ICC and nonmember countries like the United States.

  • International Environmental Law , JURI: 5750 , Credit Hours: 3
    Interdisciplinary introduction to international environmental law and policy, focusing on how international environmental regimes emerge, develop and influence behavior. Selected case studies on topics such as acid rain, global warming, whaling, deforestation, and trade in endangered species.

  • International Human Rights , JURI: 4670 , Credit Hours: 2
    How can a community mend after armed conflict or similar violence? How can countries that once waged war—the United States and Vietnam or Cuba, for instance—achieve the reconciliation and reparations necessary for political, social, and economic cooperation? What role do memory and memorials play in this process? In search of answers, this seminar will examine the transitional justice jurisprudence of international criminal tribunals and regional human rights regimes, as well as writings by jurists and social theorists. Students may seek advance writing credit for their seminar papers, which will form a substantial part of the final grade.

  • International Law Colloquium , JURI: 5205 , Credit Hours: 3
    This course will consist of presentations of substantial works-in-progress on a variety of international law topics by prominent scholars from other law schools, as detailed at http://www.law.uga.edu/international-law-colloquium-series. In addition to reading the manuscripts and actively participating in classroom discussion of the work with the presenters, students will be expected to write a 3-4 page reaction paper on each of the colloquium papers. The course is repeatable; however, priority will be given to students who have not previously taken the course.

  • International Legal Research , JURI: 5380 , Credit Hours: 1
    Researching international and foreign law requires materials and methods different from those employed in researching U.S. law. This short course provides an overview of international law, with an emphasis on the resources and skills used to locate relevant international and foreign resources. Although students and researchers of international and comparative law should find this course particularly useful, non-specialists will also find it helpful in an increasingly global legal arena. Class discussions will include the differences between public international law, private international law, and municipal (foreign) law, important research tools, UN and other intergovernmental organizations (IGOs), non-governmental organizations (NGOs); European Union & other regional organizations. Weekly research exercises provide hands-on experience in locating materials.

  • International Taxation , JURI: 4710 , Credit Hours: 2
    Considers role of American lawyer acting as tax planner in context of transnational business transactions; U.S. income taxation consequences of foreign corporations and individuals doing business and investing in U.S.; similar tax consequences of American companies and individuals doing business and investing in foreign countries.

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