Public Interest Courses

Qualifying course offerings can change from semester to semester. For a complete list for the current academic year, check the student handbook or contact the Law School Registrar.


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  • Administrative Law , JURI: 4320 , Credit Hours: 3
    Focuses on law controlling federal and state administrative action. Along with constitutional restraints, student is asked to consider statutory and judicially formulated rules for the administrative process. Control over administrative discretion and enforced accountability are major themes. Attention is devoted to federal and state Administrative Procedure Acts.

  • Appellate Litigation Clinic (Summer Semester) , JURI: 4157S , Credit Hours: 2
    This course picks up where the Appellate Litigation Clinic II leaves off in the spring semester. Students will draft petitions for certiorari in cases where the Circuit Courts of Appeals have denied our clients relief, prepare clemency petitions to the Office of the United States Pardon Attorney when appropriate, and write merits briefs to the Circuit Courts of Appeals and Board of Immigration Appeals for any cases still pending at the appellate court level during the summer term. Overall, the course will teach students the intricacies of appellate practice, including how to write persuasively, how to communicate with clients, and how to learn and follow the applicable procedural rules.

  • Appellate Litigation Clinic I & II , JURI: 4155S, 4156S , Credit Hours: 3 each
    This clinic is designed to train students to be appellate litigators. It is a year-long clinic. Credit for the first semester generally requires participation in the second semester. It is open only to third year law students. Students will get three credits for each semester, and the class will meet for one two-hour seminar per week. The first semester will be pass/fail, and the second semester will have the traditional grading system. The clinic will essentially operate as a small firm and will accept clients with cases before both federal circuit courts of appeals and the Board of Immigration Appeals. Students will work in teams of two or three to review the record of the case, identify the issues that should be raised in the appeal, draft the briefs (both opening brief and reply brief), and do the oral argument if permitted and if oral argument is scheduled. This clinic will require a significant time commitment, particularly around the time that briefs are due and oral arguments are scheduled. Briefing schedules for the different teams will vary. The subject matter of the cases before the Courts of Appeals will vary. Obviously, the cases before the Board of Immigration Appeals will be immigration cases (primarily appeals of deportation orders). Enrollment in the clinic is by application only.

  • Business Law Clinic , JURI: 4216S, 4217S , Credit Hours: 4 (2 hrs graded, 2 hrs pass/fail)
    The Business Law Clinic offers students an opportunity to develop essential lawyering skills in a professional, interactive, live-client environment. Supervised students will represent entrepreneurs, small business owners and not for profit organizations that cannot otherwise afford legal services. Services provided will relate to such matters as entity formation, corporate governance, employment and contracts. Students will learn how to interview, counsel, draft and negotiate, and will develop problem-solving, analytical and editorial skills in the context of client projects and reality-grounded class work. In addition to allowing students to learn transactional lawyering skills, the Business Law Clinic will provide clients with quality pro bono legal services, in keeping with the University of Georgia School of Law’s commitment to serving the community. Class size will be limited to eight students. The course consists of a seminar and 8-10 hours per week of supervised client projects. Consistent with Law School policy on clinical courses, two credits will be graded and two credits will be pass/fail.

  • Capital Assistance Project , JURI: 5310S , Credit Hours: 2
    Students work with attorneys at agencies which defend individuals charged with capital offenses. In the classroom component, students will discuss work experiences, examine current issues in capital punishment, and evaluate special problems which confront the attorney defending a capital case.

  • Capital Punishment , JURI: 5840 , Credit Hours: 3
    An in-depth examination of the legal and social issues surrounding capital punishment. Surveys a variety of legal issues in areas of criminal law and procedure, constitutional law and ethics which confront attorneys in capital cases. The course will encourage students to synthesize the social and legal facets to objectively evaluate the complex issues involved in capital punishment.

  • Children and International Law , JURI: 4745 , Credit Hours: 2
    Many aspects of international law concern issues related to children. The 1989 Convention on the Rights of the Child contains a catalog of ways that countries have pledged to protect children. Other treaties deal with specific topics; for instance, intercountry adoption, cross-border abduction, child labor, trafficking in children, and recruitment and use of child soldiers. The obligations set forth in those treaties are implemented both in national legislation and through global institutions including the United Nations, the International Labour Organization, and the International Criminal Court. This seminar will explore these developments at the intersection of family, labor, criminal justice, and international law. Grading will be based on students' research papers, which can satisfy the Advanced Writing Requirement.

  • Children in the Legal System , JURI: 4750 , Credit Hours: 3
    This course will focus on the legal status, rights, and disabilities of children in the American legal system. Initial emphasis will be on the condition of children in America, the development of the juvenile and family courts, and the development of children's constitutional rights in the home, in school, and in public. Significant attention will then be given to issues concerning child welfare, medical treatment, and juvenile delinquency. Other subjects that may be covered include status-based offenses and the representation of children. Grading will be based heavily on class participation in addition to a final examination.

  • Civil Externship I , JURI: 5970S, 5971L , Credit Hours: 2 - 6
    The objective of this course, in which various governmental and private organizations will provide placements for student externships, is to engage students in three primary learning experiences: direct exposure to the skills and methods of legal practice; focused application of legal concepts to real conflicts; and reflective appraisal of their own abilities, values, and professional goals. In addition to the field work provided by the externships, a clinic seminar will provide a jurisprudential context in which to consider and organize the learning gained in the field. Register for both 5970S or 5963S (graded portion) and 5971L or 5964S (pass/fail portion).

  • Civil Externship II , JURI: 5963S, 5964S , Credit Hours: 2 - 6
    The objective of this course, in which various governmental and private organizations will provide placements for student externships, is to engage students in three primary learning experiences: direct exposure to the skills and methods of legal practice; focused application of legal concepts to real conflicts; and reflective appraisal of their own abilities, values, and professional goals. In addition to the field work provided by the externships, a clinic seminar will provide a jurisprudential context in which to consider and organize the learning gained in the field. Register for both 5970S or 5963S (graded portion) and 5971L or 5964S (pass/fail portion).

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