Sports & Entertainment Law Courses

Qualifying course offerings can change from semester to semester. For a complete list for the current academic year, check the student handbook or contact the Law School Registrar.


View more Course Concentrations | Visit the Course Offerings Search Form
  • ADR / Alternative Dispute Resolution , JURI: 5735 , Credit Hours: 2
    This course introduces the law and practices of negotiation, mediation, and arbitration through in-class discussions and role-playing exercises that simulate the work of lawyers in these contexts. Each student will be graded on class participation in the role-playing exercises and on a paper submitted at the end of the semester.

  • Business Law Clinic , JURI: 4216S, 4217S , Credit Hours: 4 (2 hrs graded, 2 hrs pass/fail)
    The Business Law Clinic offers students an opportunity to develop essential lawyering skills in a professional, interactive, live-client environment. Supervised students will represent entrepreneurs, small business owners and not for profit organizations that cannot otherwise afford legal services. Services provided will relate to such matters as entity formation, corporate governance, employment and contracts. Students will learn how to interview, counsel, draft and negotiate, and will develop problem-solving, analytical and editorial skills in the context of client projects and reality-grounded class work. In addition to allowing students to learn transactional lawyering skills, the Business Law Clinic will provide clients with quality pro bono legal services, in keeping with the University of Georgia School of Law’s commitment to serving the community. Class size will be limited to eight students. The course consists of a seminar and 8-10 hours per week of supervised client projects. Consistent with Law School policy on clinical courses, two credits will be graded and two credits will be pass/fail.

  • Business Negotiations , JURI: 4211 , Credit Hours: 2
    This course will focus on negotiations theory, strategy, skills, and style in the context of business transactions as well as business disputes. Students will participate in simulated negotiations and will prepare written assignments and a comprehensive appraisal in lieu of a final exam.

  • Copyright Law , JURI: 4430 , Credit Hours: 2
    Focus is upon various methods to protect literary, musical, and artistic work under law of copyright. Copyright is a statutory subject based upon Copyright Act of 1909 and its amendments and Copyright Act of 1976. The course deals with what can be copyrighted, infringement actions, rights enjoyed by the copyright proprietor, jurisdiction and various remedies. Students in the class of 2013 and later are encouraged to take the IP Survey course before taking this course. NOTE: One cannot take the IP Survey (JURI 5050) after having taken any two of the following courses: Copyright Law (JURI 4430), Patent Law (JURI 4920), or Trademark Law (JURI 4930). If the IP Survey course is taken first, any or all three of the advanced intellectual property courses can be taken.

  • Corporate Counsel Externship , JURI: 5968S, 5969E , Credit Hours: 4 - 6
    This course explores the practice of law from the perspective of an in-house counsel. Students will spend 1-2 days each week in a corporate legal department where they will have work assignments and experience firsthand the inner workings of a legal department. A 2-hour seminar each week will supplement the on-site work with discussions about relevant substantive topics and opportunities to build skills through drafting projects and simulations. In lieu of a final exam, students will prepare an appraisal with critical reflections about their externship and an oral presentation.

  • Document Drafting: Contracts , JURI: 5850 , Credit Hours: 3
    An introduction to drafting, analyzing, and revising contracts. You cannot take this course if you are currently taking or have taken Legal Drafting for Transactional Practice.

  • Employment Law , JURI: 5650 , Credit Hours: 3
    Examines legal regulation of the employment relationship, focusing on the erosion of the employment-at-will doctrine through various tort and contract theories, law of employee mobility including non-competes and trade secrets, protection of employee privacy and speech interests, entitlement to overtime under the Fair labor Standards Act, and the regulation of health and pension benefits under ERISA. Excludes the union/management issues covered in Labor Law and statutory discrimination issues covered in Employment Discrimination.

  • Entertainment Law , JURI: 5570 , Credit Hours: 2
    Students will learn about the fundamental elements of entertainment law, including: (a) basics of copyright, trademark, and right of publicity law; (b) how intellectual property rights are transferred and acquired; and, (c) how relationships within the entertainment industry are structured.

  • Intellectual Property Survey , JURI: 5050 , Credit Hours: 3
    This course provides an introduction to the four primary types of intellectual property protection: copyright, patent, trademark, and trade secret. Students gain a basic understanding of the various grounds for and limitations of such protections. This course serves as both an introduction to the field for those anticipating further study and a survey of the area for those planning to focus on a different area of law. NOTE: One cannot take the IP Survey (JURI 5050) after having taken any two of the following courses: Copyright Law (JURI 4430), Patent Law (JURI 4920), or Trademark Law (JURI 4930). If the IP Survey course is taken first, any or all three of the advanced intellectual property courses can be taken.

  • Labor Arbitration , JURI: 4770 , Credit Hours: 2
    This course is organized in three distinct parts. Part 1 will explore the historical and legal development of labor arbitration and its relationship to collective bargaining. Part 2 will address common issues including evidence, discipline and discharge, and contract interpretation. Part 3 will consist of three simulated, mock arbitration hearings. In each mock arbitration students will rotate between the roles of union counsel, management counsel, and arbitrator. Counsel will write post-hearing briefs, and arbitrators will write decisions. There is no final exam in this course. Student grades will be based on a combination of class participation (5%), self-evaluations (5%) and the 3 mock arbitrations (25% for the first, 30% for the second, and 35% for the third.) Grades for the mock arbitrations will be based on post-hearing briefs by the advocates and decisions by the arbitrators. This course meets the requirements of a practical skills course and will include a student self-evaluation component to be assigned during the course.  There are no required prerequisite courses for the labor arbitration course.  This class is capped at 18.

Pages