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Course Offerings

You will find a broad and challenging curriculum at Georgia Law - nearly 170 courses are offered, although not all of the listed courses are taught each year. First-year students are just as likely to encounter a tenured or chaired faculty member in the classroom as they are a junior professor.  Distinguished visitors and adjuncts supplement the faculty and diversify the upper-level curriculum. Not all listed courses are offered each semester. Periodically, other courses are offered.  Unless otherwise noted, all law courses carry the prefix "JURI." 

CURRENT STUDENTS: For the upcoming academic year, awlays visit the Class Schedules & Registration webpage for requirement lists and guidelines including 2L Writing, Advanced Writing, Capstone, and Practical Skills requirements.

To search by JURI number or course name, visit our custom course search.

Watch a selection of faculty video Insights for guidance in choosing courses.

  • Game Theory and the Law , JURI 5595 , Credit Hours: 1
    The course will present the basic models of game theory and their legal applications, with special emphasis on interactive learning through participating in games (both online and in-class) and discussion of the dynamics of decision-making present within each game. Towards this purpose, students will be asked to register to a course-specific website through which "problem sets" will be posted – games requiring students to input their choices and providing class statistics and results to be discussed in the following lesson. Participation in games should facilitate learning – both in pushing students to tackle strategic questions within each game, and in requiring thought as to legal situations in which similar dynamics arise.  Course material will focus on non-cooperative game theory (where each actor is presumed to be a self-utility-maximizing individual or firm), though some models of cooperative game theory will be presented as well (formation of coalitions among members). Application to legal issues will be discussed, both based on scholarly writings and on students' input as to real-life situations where similar strategic interactions arise (relying both on case law and non-legal everyday experience). No prior knowledge of game theory or economics is presumed, and all technical know-how necessary for understanding, presenting, and solving game structures will be included in the course itself. The focus of this course is onunderstanding and being able to apply game theory's insights to everyday and legal decision-making, rather than theoretical knowledge alone.

  • Georgia Election Law , JURI 5590 , Credit Hours: 1
    This course examines the relationships between law, elections, and government focusing on Georgia law. It will cover laws and regulations governing political candidates, their campaigns, state campaign finance, public officials, ethics in government, and the regulation of the political process. Regulation of lobbyists will be examined, as will independent committees and political action committees. Additionally, the course will look at the process of Georgia judicial campaigns and appointments, and the regulation of public officials once in office.

  • Georgia History for Lawyers , JURI 4871 , Credit Hours: 3
    A survey of the people, places, and events that form the history of the State of Georgia from prehistoric times to the present, including the ways in which history has intersected with Georgia and U.S. Law. Students will be expected to produce a paper examining in depth an issue of legal importance in Georgia History.

  • Georgia Legal Research , JURI 4089 , Credit Hours: 1
    A hands-on exploration of Georgia legal research resources. The course will cover primary and secondary sources, advanced searching skills, topical research and cost saving strategies. Students will complete research for simulated client matters: preparing civil and criminal cases for trial, completing a business transaction and representing a client in an administrative hearing.

  • Georgia Practice and Procedure , JURI 4620 , Credit Hours: 3
    An advanced course in Civil Procedure. Explores in depth the Georgia Civil Practice Act and Long-Arm Statute, as interpreted by Georgia appellate court decisions, along with selected constitutional and statutory provisions allocating jurisdiction among trial courts, venue, and validity of judgments.

  • Georgia State and Local Government , JURI 4905 , Credit Hours: 3
    This course explores principles of state and local government in Georgia.  Issues include organizational structures of local governments and the authority granted to by the U.S. and Georgia Constitutions.  Writing and research associated with practice in this area, and reflection on professional roles and responsibilities are elements of the course. This course meets the practical skills requirement. Students who have taken JURI 4900 are not eligible to take this course.

  • Global Economic Governance , JURI 5883 , Credit Hours: 1
    The architecture and rules of global and transnational economic law will be the focus of this course. Topics may include international trade, international investment law, international financial regulation, international monetary law, and/or international business transactions. International, regional, bilateral, and unilateral systems, as well as formal and informal arrangements and rules, will be compared. This course is a part of the Global Governance Summer School in Belgium.

  • Global Governance , JURI 5885 , Credit Hours: 3 , Prerequisite: JURI 4270 or 4640 or 4645 or 5360 or 4670 or 5894 or 5750 or 4745, or 4675 or permission of instructor
    In a globalizing world, the range of issues with cross-border implications only expands, from finance to trade, environment to human rights, food safety to sports. This upper-level course in International Law examines how and why different legal regimes have developed to govern these issues and when they succeed or fail.

  • Global Governance Overview , JURI 5881 , Credit Hours: 1
    Global governance has emerged as a key concept in debates on how to address transnational challenges. Applying a multidisciplinary perspective, this overview course will familiarize students with the various actors, institutions, policies, and sets of rules that shape today’s global governance fora and have an impact on international policy-making levels. This course is a part of the Global Governance Summer School in Belgium.

  • Global Governance Practicum , JURI 5884 , Credit Hours: 1
    Global governance is pervasive in our increasingly transnational times. This practicum will prepare students to be leaders in the field by providing a hands-on experience that connects their classroom study with today’s headlines. Working in small groups, students will explore current events via targeted research and writing, role-playing, and group presentations. This course is a part of the Global Governance Summer School in Belgium.

  • Global Human Rights & Security Governance , JURI 5882 , Credit Hours: 1
    Humans’ place in world affairs poses questions of global governance. This course thus will examine: What rights do humans enjoy? How and against whom are those rights to be enforced? Is human security a better lens for examination? How is individual security to be balanced against national and international security? This course is a part of the Global Governance Summer School in Belgium.

  • Health Care Fraud and Abuse , JURI 5621 , Credit Hours: 2
    This course meets the substantial writing requirement with permission of the instructor only. The course will examine federal and state laws imposing civil and criminal penalties on health care providers, with special emphasis on the federal False Claims Act, the Anti-Kickback Statute, and the Physician Self-Referral (Stark) Law. Civil Monetary Penalty and exclusion laws, application of traditional federal white-collar criminal statutes to health care, and state fraud and abuse laws also will be discussed. Ample experiential learning opportunities will be provided through drafting assignments, mock client advising problems, and guest lectures, including state and federal regulatory and law enforcement agencies, practicing attorneys, and health care industry executives.

  • Health Law Seminar , JURI 5625 , Credit Hours: 2
    This seminar will examine the central issues faced by health care attorneys, with emphasis on in-house counsel who undertake to represent hospitals and health systems in the United States. Among the topics examined will be the statutory and regulatory frameworks designed to reduce and penalize fraud and abuse of the Federal health care programs. Statutory frameworks to be studied will include: the Federal Physician Self-Referral Prohibition, known as the Stark Law that provides civil penalties against physicians that refer patients to entities to which they have a financial interest; the Federal Anti-Kickback Statute that provides civil and criminal penalties for anyone that pays or receives kick-backs for health care referrals; and the Civil Monetary Penalties Act as they relate to health reimbursement and business development. Also considered will be the Emergency Medical Treatment and Active Labor Act, EMTALA, known as the patient anti-dumping law; the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act, HIPAA; and Disproportionate Share Hospital (DSH) programs.

  • Higher Education Law , JURI 5783 , Credit Hours: 3
    The course will examine the constitutional, statutory, administrative, and common-law principles that shape the structure, identity, and character of American public and private colleges and universities, including academic freedom, the rights and responsibilities of students and faculty, issues of identity and access, shared governance, accreditation and regulation.

  • Housing Law , JURI 5540 , Credit Hours: 3 , Prerequisite: JURI 4090
    The course covers selected issues in housing law and policy, drawn from both the private and public sectors. The course accommodates a number of different perspectives and interest areas, including non-legal disciplines related to housing. The course will be run seminar style, with assigned readings, directed discussion, and guest lectures. Each student will prepare a major research paper on a topic related to housing and will make an oral presentation of the paper to the class. There is no final exam.

  • Hulsey-Gambrell Moot Court Competition , JURI 5046 , Credit Hours: 1
    A two-student team practices oral arguments under the supervision of a faculty advisor in preparation for a competition against the University of Florida before a panel of state and federal judges. A student registering for this course must be selected as a competing advocate who will attend the competition in the semester in which the student registers.

  • Immigration Law , JURI 5890 , Credit Hours: 3
    This course will examine American immigration law and policy. Topics considered include source and scope of Congressional power to regulate immigration; procedures for entry, exclusion, and deportation; refugees and asylum; current immigration law reform; and the role of states in regulating migrants. This course is intended both for those who are considering immigration law as a career and for those who want a general introduction to an important area of law that intersects with many areas of practice, including administrative, criminal, family, employment, and international.

  • Independent Project , JURI 5510 , Credit Hours: 1 - 2
    Independent projects provide student with flexible opportunity to independently explore legal issues or questions sometimes not found in any course or seminar and without following format of a formal research paper. Projects must involve significant legal, social, or empirical research or experience.

  • Innovation in the Practice of Law , JURI 4628 , Credit Hours: 2
    This course introduces students to innovations necessary to keep pace with a rapidly changing legal industry and that will ensure that those in need of representation have equal access to justice, including among others: AI, predictive analytics, process management, alternative pricing models, and collaborative workspace platforms.

  • Insurance Law , JURI 4630 , Credit Hours: 2
    This is an experiential class based on a survey of liability and first party insurance coverage issues. The course will include a review of current and recurring issues in liability insurance, including commercial general liability insurance, professional liability insurance, directors and officers insurance, and umbrella and excess insurance. Within this context, coverage for subjects such as environmental claims, construction defect claims, and claims against corporate officers and directors for breach of fiduciary duty and mismanagement will be discussed. The course will also include a review of current and recurring issues under first party property policies. Within this general context, the course will also survey emerging insurance coverage issues, such as coverage for cyber liability claims and claims related to alleged climate change. To provide experiential learning, cases will be assigned in advance to be argued by teams of opposing counsel, one team representing the insurer and one team representing the insured. The class will be graded as follows: 10 percent based on class participation in arguing a pre-assigned case (this will be based on the substance of the argument and not on presentation skills); 40 percent based on a mid-term assignment to write a reservation of rights letter or coverage memorandum based on a written problem (which will include a self-evaluation component), and 50 percent on a one hour open book final exam.

  • Intellectual Property Survey , JURI 5050 , Credit Hours: 3
    This course provides an introduction to the four primary types of intellectual property protection: copyright, patent, trademark, and trade secret. Students gain a basic understanding of the various grounds for and limitations of such protections. This course serves as both an introduction to the field for those anticipating further study and a survey of the area for those planning to focus on a different area of law. NOTE: One cannot take the IP Survey (JURI 5050) after having taken any two of the following courses: Copyright Law (JURI 4430), Patent Law (JURI 4920), or Trademark Law (JURI 4930). If the IP Survey course is taken first, any or all three of the advanced intellectual property courses can be taken.

  • Interdisciplinary Environmental Law Practicum , JURI 5290 , Credit Hours: 4
    Advanced research in legal control of environmental problems, with primary attention given to water and biodiversity issues. Law students work with graduate students from other disciplines including ecology, forestry, agriculture and environmental design, to address problems identified by watershed stakeholders.

  • Internal Investigations , JURI 5646 , Credit Hours: 3
    Course examines how corporations and their personnel investigate their own conduct.  Course will develop students’ understanding of the roles of management, the board of directors, and their respective counsel in corporate investigations and their interplay with government regulators, such as the Department of Justice and the Securities and Exchange Commission.

  • International Advocacy Seminar , JURI 5041 , Credit Hours: 2
    Preparation, handling of international law moot court case and representation of hypothetical states before international legal tribunal. Topics covered impart knowledge of international legal reasoning, novel research and effective oral advocacy. This course is graded S/U. Enrollment extended by permission.

  • International Arbitration , JURI 4720 , Credit Hours: 2
    This course will examine the legal regime governing international commercial arbitration. Topics will include the enforcement of arbitration agreements, arbitral procedure and the enforcement of arbitral awards. The course also will consider how to draft arbitral clauses.

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