Electives Courses

Qualifying course offerings can change from semester to semester. For a complete list for the current academic year, check the student handbook or contact the Law School Registrar.


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  • Global Governance Practicum , JURI: 5884 , Credit Hours: 1
    Global governance is pervasive in our increasingly transnational times. This practicum will prepare students to be leaders in the field by providing a hands-on experience that connects their classroom study with today’s headlines. Working in small groups, students will explore current events via targeted research and writing, role-playing, and group presentations. This course is a part of the Global Governance Summer School in Belgium.

  • Global Human Rights & Security Governance , JURI: 5882 , Credit Hours: 1
    Humans’ place in world affairs poses questions of global governance. This course thus will examine: What rights do humans enjoy? How and against whom are those rights to be enforced? Is human security a better lens for examination? How is individual security to be balanced against national and international security? This course is a part of the Global Governance Summer School in Belgium.

  • Health Care Fraud and Abuse , JURI: 5621 , Credit Hours: 2
    This course meets the substantial writing requirement with permission of the instructor only. The course will examine federal and state laws imposing civil and criminal penalties on health care providers, with special emphasis on the federal False Claims Act, the Anti-Kickback Statute, and the Physician Self-Referral (Stark) Law. Civil Monetary Penalty and exclusion laws, application of traditional federal white-collar criminal statutes to health care, and state fraud and abuse laws also will be discussed. Ample experiential learning opportunities will be provided through drafting assignments, mock client advising problems, and guest lectures, including state and federal regulatory and law enforcement agencies, practicing attorneys, and health care industry executives.

  • Health Law Seminar , JURI: 5625 , Credit Hours: 2
    This seminar will examine the central issues faced by health care attorneys, with emphasis on in-house counsel who undertake to represent hospitals and health systems in the United States. Among the topics examined will be the statutory and regulatory frameworks designed to reduce and penalize fraud and abuse of the Federal health care programs. Statutory frameworks to be studied will include: the Federal Physician Self-Referral Prohibition, known as the Stark Law that provides civil penalties against physicians that refer patients to entities to which they have a financial interest; the Federal Anti-Kickback Statute that provides civil and criminal penalties for anyone that pays or receives kick-backs for health care referrals; and the Civil Monetary Penalties Act as they relate to health reimbursement and business development. Also considered will be the Emergency Medical Treatment and Active Labor Act, EMTALA, known as the patient anti-dumping law; the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act, HIPAA; and Disproportionate Share Hospital (DSH) programs.

  • Higher Education Law , JURI: 5783 , Credit Hours: 3
    The course will examine the constitutional, statutory, administrative, and common-law principles that shape the structure, identity, and character of American public and private colleges and universities, including academic freedom, the rights and responsibilities of students and faculty, issues of identity and access, shared governance, accreditation and regulation.

  • Housing Law , JURI: 5540 , Credit Hours: 3
    The course covers selected issues in housing law and policy, drawn from both the private and public sectors. The course accommodates a number of different perspectives and interest areas, including non-legal disciplines related to housing. The course will be run seminar style, with assigned readings, directed discussion, and guest lectures. Each student will prepare a major research paper on a topic related to housing and will make an oral presentation of the paper to the class. There is no final exam.

  • Hulsey-Gambrell Moot Court Competition , JURI: 5046 , Credit Hours: 1
    A two-student team practices oral arguments under the supervision of a faculty advisor in preparation for a competition against the University of Florida before a panel of state and federal judges. A student registering for this course must be selected as a competing advocate who will attend the competition in the semester in which the student registers.

  • Immigration Law , JURI: 5890 , Credit Hours: 3
    This course will examine American immigration law and policy. Topics considered include source and scope of Congressional power to regulate immigration; procedures for entry, exclusion, and deportation; refugees and asylum; current immigration law reform; and the role of states in regulating migrants. This course is intended both for those who are considering immigration law as a career and for those who want a general introduction to an important area of law that intersects with many areas of practice, including administrative, criminal, family, employment, and international.

  • Independent Project , JURI: 5510 , Credit Hours: 1 - 2
    Independent projects provide student with flexible opportunity to independently explore legal issues or questions sometimes not found in any course or seminar and without following format of a formal research paper. Projects must involve significant legal, social, or empirical research or experience.

  • Insurance Law , JURI: 4630 , Credit Hours: 2
    This is an experiential class based on a survey of liability and first party insurance coverage issues. The course will include a review of current and recurring issues in liability insurance, including commercial general liability insurance, professional liability insurance, directors and officers insurance, and umbrella and excess insurance. Within this context, coverage for subjects such as environmental claims, construction defect claims, and claims against corporate officers and directors for breach of fiduciary duty and mismanagement will be discussed. The course will also include a review of current and recurring issues under first party property policies. Within this general context, the course will also survey emerging insurance coverage issues, such as coverage for cyber liability claims and claims related to alleged climate change. To provide experiential learning, cases will be assigned in advance to be argued by teams of opposing counsel, one team representing the insurer and one team representing the insured. The class will be graded as follows: 10 percent based on class participation in arguing a pre-assigned case (this will be based on the substance of the argument and not on presentation skills); 40 percent based on a mid-term assignment to write a reservation of rights letter or coverage memorandum based on a written problem (which will include a self-evaluation component), and 50 percent on a one hour open book final exam.

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