Electives Courses

Qualifying course offerings can change from semester to semester. For a complete list for the current academic year, check the student handbook or contact the Law School Registrar.


View more Course Concentrations | Visit the Course Offerings Search Form
  • Georgia Practice and Procedure , JURI: 4620 , Credit Hours: 3
    An advanced course in Civil Procedure. Explores in depth the Georgia Civil Practice Act and Long-Arm Statute, as interpreted by Georgia appellate court decisions, along with selected constitutional and statutory provisions allocating jurisdiction among trial courts, venue, and validity of judgments.

  • Georgia State and Local Government , JURI: 4905 , Credit Hours: 3
    This course explores principles of state and local government in Georgia.  Issues include organizational structures of local governments and the authority granted to by the U.S. and Georgia Constitutions.  Writing and research associated with practice in this area, and reflection on professional roles and responsibilities are elements of the course. This course meets the practical skills requirement. Students who have taken JURI 4900 are not eligible to take this course.

  • Global Economic Governance , JURI: 5883 , Credit Hours: 1
    The architecture and rules of global and transnational economic law will be the focus of this course. Topics may include international trade, international investment law, international financial regulation, international monetary law, and/or international business transactions. International, regional, bilateral, and unilateral systems, as well as formal and informal arrangements and rules, will be compared. This course is a part of the Global Governance Summer School in Belgium.

  • Global Governance , JURI: 5885 , Credit Hours: 3
    In a globalizing world, the range of issues with cross-border implications only expands, from finance to trade, environment to human rights, food safety to sports. This upper-level course in International Law examines how and why different legal regimes have developed to govern these issues and when they succeed or fail.

  • Global Governance Overview , JURI: 5881 , Credit Hours: 1
    Global governance has emerged as a key concept in debates on how to address transnational challenges. Applying a multidisciplinary perspective, this overview course will familiarize students with the various actors, institutions, policies, and sets of rules that shape today’s global governance fora and have an impact on international policy-making levels. This course is a part of the Global Governance Summer School in Belgium.

  • Global Governance Practicum , JURI: 5884 , Credit Hours: 1
    Global governance is pervasive in our increasingly transnational times. This practicum will prepare students to be leaders in the field by providing a hands-on experience that connects their classroom study with today’s headlines. Working in small groups, students will explore current events via targeted research and writing, role-playing, and group presentations. This course is a part of the Global Governance Summer School in Belgium.

  • Global Human Rights & Security Governance , JURI: 5882 , Credit Hours: 1
    Humans’ place in world affairs poses questions of global governance. This course thus will examine: What rights do humans enjoy? How and against whom are those rights to be enforced? Is human security a better lens for examination? How is individual security to be balanced against national and international security? This course is a part of the Global Governance Summer School in Belgium.

  • Health Care Fraud and Abuse , JURI: 5621 , Credit Hours: 2
    This course meets the substantial writing requirement with permission of the instructor only. The course will examine federal and state laws imposing civil and criminal penalties on health care providers, with special emphasis on the federal False Claims Act, the Anti-Kickback Statute, and the Physician Self-Referral (Stark) Law. Civil Monetary Penalty and exclusion laws, application of traditional federal white-collar criminal statutes to health care, and state fraud and abuse laws also will be discussed. Ample experiential learning opportunities will be provided through drafting assignments, mock client advising problems, and guest lectures, including state and federal regulatory and law enforcement agencies, practicing attorneys, and health care industry executives.

  • Health Law Seminar , JURI: 5625 , Credit Hours: 2
    This seminar will examine the central issues faced by health care attorneys, with emphasis on in-house counsel who undertake to represent hospitals and health systems in the United States. Among the topics examined will be the statutory and regulatory frameworks designed to reduce and penalize fraud and abuse of the Federal health care programs. Statutory frameworks to be studied will include: the Federal Physician Self-Referral Prohibition, known as the Stark Law that provides civil penalties against physicians that refer patients to entities to which they have a financial interest; the Federal Anti-Kickback Statute that provides civil and criminal penalties for anyone that pays or receives kick-backs for health care referrals; and the Civil Monetary Penalties Act as they relate to health reimbursement and business development. Also considered will be the Emergency Medical Treatment and Active Labor Act, EMTALA, known as the patient anti-dumping law; the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act, HIPAA; and Disproportionate Share Hospital (DSH) programs.

  • Higher Education Law , JURI: 5783 , Credit Hours: 3
    The course will examine the constitutional, statutory, administrative, and common-law principles that shape the structure, identity, and character of American public and private colleges and universities, including academic freedom, the rights and responsibilities of students and faculty, issues of identity and access, shared governance, accreditation and regulation.

Pages