Georgia Law's Sibley Lecture to address tort law

Monday, March 31, 2014

Writer: Lona Panter, 706/542-5172, lonap@uga.edu
Contact: Heidi Murphy, 706/583-5487, hmurphy@uga.edu

UGA School of Law Sibley Lecture to address tort law

Athens, Ga. – John Goldberg, Goldston Professor of Law at Harvard University, will present “Inexcusable Wrongs” as the University of Georgia School of Law’s 111th Sibley Lecturer April 11 at 3:30 p.m. in the Hatton Lovejoy Courtroom of Hirsch Hall. The event is free and open to the public.

An expert in tort law, tort theory and political philosophy, Goldberg will discuss how tort law has little patience for excuses while criminal law is more forgiving. He will offer a unified account of many of tort law’s core features as well as a broadened understanding of what it means for law to identify conduct as wrongful and for law to set up schemes for holding wrongdoers accountable.

A former judicial clerk for Justice Byron White of the U.S. Supreme Court, Goldberg joined the Harvard Law School faculty in 2008. Previously, he was a faculty member at Vanderbilt University Law School, where he served as associate dean for research from 2006 to 2008.

In addition to publishing numerous articles in respected law journals, Goldberg is the co-author of Tort Law: Responsibilities and Redress. He is also a member of the editorial board of Legal Theory and serves as editor-in-chief of the Journal of Tort Law.

Goldberg earned his Juris Doctor from the New York University School of Law and his bachelor’s degree with high honors from Wesleyan University. He also holds a Master of Philosophy in Politics from Oxford University and a Master of Arts in Politics from Princeton University.

The Sibley Lecture Series, established in 1964 by the Charles Loridans Foundation of Atlanta in tribute to the late John A. Sibley, is designed to attract outstanding legal scholars of national prominence to Georgia Law. Sibley was a 1911 graduate of the law school.

UGA School of Law
Consistently regarded as one of the nation’s top public law schools, the School of Law at the University of Georgia was established in 1859. With an accomplished faculty, which includes authors of some of the country’s leading legal scholarship, Georgia Law offers three degrees—the Juris Doctor, the Master of Laws in U.S. Law and the Master in the Study of Law—and is home to the renowned Dean Rusk Center for International Law and Policy. The school counts six U.S. Supreme Court judicial clerks in the last nine years among its distinguished alumni body of more than 9,700. For more information, please see www.law.uga.edu.

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