masthead

October 2016


Happy Halloween Legal Research Contest

By Endia Sowers Paige

Happy Halloween from the Alexander Campbell King Law Library! Enter our legal research contest for a chance to win a treat.

  • Find the name of the person who sued Satan for misery, unwarranted threats, and for placing deliberate obstacles in the plaintiff’s path which caused his/her downfall. Name the state where this case originated.
  • Find the Louisiana case where a customer sued a corn maze owner after sustaining injury while running from “Jason” (of Friday the 13th fame) and his chainsaw.  Please provide the case citation. What was the court’s holding?
  • Find the citation for the case involving a couple who claimed their First Amendment rights were violated after being asked to remove tombstones from their yard that listed their neighbor’s names as the deceased parties.

Email your answers to epaige@uga.edu  by midnight on October 31st to enter our prize raffle. Good luck!


Discover U.S. Government Information on govinfo.gov

By Wendy Moore

Launched earlier this year, govinfo provides free online public access to more than a million official publications from all three branches of the Federal Government.  Through govinfo, you can use browse and advanced search capabilities to locate and download documents.  This mobile-friendly website makes it easy to share pages and content.  When viewing “Content Details” pages for a document, some selections feature a “Related Documents” tab that makes it easier to discover and link to additional documents on your topic.  The site is still being developed, so new content and backfiles of documents are being loaded frequently.

A service of the United States Government Publishing Office (GPO), govinfo includes a content management system and a standards-compliant preservation repository.  GPO uses digital signature technology to add a visible Seal of Authenticity to these authenticated and certified PDF documents, which makes govinfo the best place to get official federal publications.

For example, you can find federal court opinions elsewhere freely on the Internet, but the opinions found in govinfo’s United States Courts Opinions (USCOURTS) collection have been provided by the Administrative Office of the United States Courts and authenticated by GPO.  This collection of opinions from selected United States appellate, district, and bankruptcy courts goes back to April 2004. Once an opinion is located, all associated opinions within the same case can be accessed from the opinion “Content Details” page.  So, don’t just Google the case you need, go to govinfo and make certain it is official!

 

 


Why Take Advanced Legal Research?

According to a recent ABA survey, lawyers with less than 10 years of experience spend nearly a third of their time conducting legal research. Becoming an expert legal researcher is one way to become a superstar in today’s competitive legal market. This spring, law librarians will teach two sections of Advanced Legal Research (JURI 4085) as well as Business Law Research (JURI 4087). Join us if you’d like to take your research skills to the next level, but don’t just take our word for it…

"Taking ALR prior to the summer between my second and third year of law school provided me with the skills and confidence to navigate complex legal research questions that were handed to me from assigning attorneys at my summer placement. Without having the foundation that this course provides, I would not have been able to complete assignments as efficiently or comprehensively."

  • Ashley Klein, 3L

A Favorable Decision of Judge Analytics

By Suzanne Graham

Investigating for judicial clerkships or preparing for a networking opportunity? Ravel Law’s Judge Analytics provides insight into a particular judge’s history of cases, trends in decision-writing, and procedural preferences.

Just type a judge’s name into the search box. This resource analyzes specific language and citations used in court decisions to offer more than a static history of cases. Results under the “Analytics” tab show a timeline of number of opinions, a list of frequently cited cases used by the judge, and references to most-cited judicial colleagues to help deepen your understanding of his or her patterns and influences.

In addition to the US Supreme Court and all federal Circuit Courts, the tool contains the Georgia Supreme Court and Georgia Court of Appeals judges.

To access upgraded features, set up your account from one of our library computers using your UGA email address. For more details, check out the short promotional video.

 

Judge Analytics by Ravel from Ravel Law on Vimeo.

 


Introducing Our Newest Addition - Classroom L


By Carol Watson

During the past six months, a former special collections area of the library has been converted to a new flexible, teaching space…affectionately known as Classroom L. A few fall semester courses are moving into the new classroom and you’ll notice some of your spring semester classes are scheduled in the new classroom as well.

One of the best features of Classroom L is its flexible furniture. With 14 trapezoid-shaped tables, the room can be configured in multiple arrangements such as a large circle, small group break-outs, traditional rows, conference-table style or u-shaped. The flexibility provides law professors with the opportunity to easily include group activities as part of their instruction. Two screens and projectors ensures that all participants in the room can view a screen, no matter where they are seated.

We think you’ll enjoy your classes in the newly renovated space and we look forward to hearing your feedback about this new instructional space.


Law Dawg of the Month: Oliver

By Anne Burnett

October's Law Dawg is Oliver, case book protector for 2L Mary Dovel:

"My name is Oliver and I'm two years old! Torts was my favorite class last year (hence why I'm sitting on the book). I haven't found my favorite class this semester yet but my mom spends a lot more time with her Corporations book than she does with me."

 

All members of the Law School Community (students, faculty and staff) are invited to submit a photo for possible selection as the Law Dawg. The featured entry for each issue will be selected at random from all entries received. Please note that honorary Law Dawgs (i.e. those of the feline, equine, porcine, avian, etc. persuasion) are eligible as well. Please send your Law Dawg photo(s) to aburnett@uga.edu.

  Oliver

 

 


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