Call for Proposals: What Research Can Tell Us About How Law Schools, Lawyers, and Leaders Can Nourish Democracy

Deadline: 

08/1/21

Event Date: 

01/5/22 to 01/9/22

Location name: 

Virtual

Organization: 

AALS Section on Empirical Study of Legal Education and the Legal Profession

Call for Proposals

What Research Can Tell Us About How Law Schools, Lawyers, and Leaders Can Nourish Democracy

AALS Section on the Empirical Study of Legal Education and the Legal Profession

Cosponsored by: The AALS Sections on Election Law, Leadership,

Legislation & Law of the Political Process, and Professional Responsibility

 

January 2022 Annual Meeting

 

The Section on the Empirical Study of Legal Education and the Legal Profession is organizing a panel featuring emerging empirical scholarship on the role of lawyers and legal education in sustaining representative democracy. Events during the past year (including some during the 2021 AALS Annual Meeting) have highlighted the critical relationship between the legal academy and our systems of political representation. Law school graduates are elected to office in all three branches of government and law faculty are commonly asked to serve in roles in each new Presidential administration. To advance our understanding of the relationship between legal education and representative democracy, we invite proposals articulating emerging empirical research on:

  1. Lawyers in representative government roles;
  2. Law school engagement with the electoral process;
  3. Navigating classroom conversations on sensitive topics with diverse populations;
  4. Social trustee professionalism in law;
  5. Internal democratic and shared-governance processes as preparation for wider civil participation;
  6. Curricular and extracurricular initiatives aimed at fostering skills enabling law graduates to participate in and play leadership roles in the democratic process;
  7. Efforts to ensure that a multitude of voices, including those of groups historically excluded or marginalized and those underrepresented in today’s academy, are represented and heard on campus; and
  8. Other related projects.

As part of this program, we also intend to solicit input from lawyers (particularly those who are current or former legal educators) with significant electoral or political roles to better understand how empirical scholarship might inform and affect their work maintaining democratic institutions. 

The January 2022 Annual Meeting will be held virtually from January 5 – 9, 2022. The specific date and time of this panel is still being determined.

Proposals. Proposals should contain an explanation of both the substance of the presentation and the methods used in the underlying research. The planning committee would prefer to highlight talent across a range of law schools, disciplines, and methodologies and is especially interested in new and innovative research. Please share this call with colleagues—both within and outside of the legal academy.

 

Proposals must include the following information: 

  1. A title for your presentation.
  2. A brief (500-word) description of your proposed presentation, including its substantive content and the empirical methods utilized in the underlying research.
  3. Your current CV.

 

The Program Committee especially welcomes submissions from women, caregivers, people of color, junior scholars, those in the LGBTQIA+ community,  first generation scholars, ESL faculty, immigrants, untenured scholars, and those whose work has been disproportionately affected by public health and working conditions in the last year.

 

Proposals will be reviewed on a rolling basis, so please send yours as soon as possible, but no later than Sunday, August 1, 2021 to Trent Kennedy. If you have any questions, please email trent.kennedy@georgetown.edu.

 

Section on Empirical Study of Legal Education and the Legal Profession Program Committee:

Program Chair: Trent Kennedy, Georgetown University Law Center

Section Chair: Jennifer A. Gundlach, Maurice A. Deane School of Law at Hofstra University

Secretary: Joel Chanvisanuruk, University of Cincinnati College of Law

Swethaa Ballakrishnen, University of California, Irvine School of Law

Benjamin Barton, University of Tennessee College of Law

Meera Deo, Law School Survey of Student Engagement

Rachel F. Moran, University of California, Los Angeles School of Law

Jeremy Paul, Northeastern University School of Law

Prior Chair: Victor D. Quintanilla, Indiana University Maurer School of Law