Constitutional Law Courses

Qualifying course offerings can change from semester to semester. For a complete list for the current academic year, check the student handbook or contact the Law School Registrar.


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  • Administrative Law , JURI: 4320 , Credit Hours: 3
    Focuses on law controlling federal and state administrative action. Along with constitutional restraints, student is asked to consider statutory and judicially formulated rules for the administrative process. Control over administrative discretion and enforced accountability are major themes. Attention is devoted to federal and state Administrative Procedure Acts.

  • American Legal History , JURI: 4870 , Credit Hours: 3
    This course will examine the role that law and legal institutions have played in American history from Reconstruction until the 1980s. We will examine the Civil War Amendments and federalism, laissez-faire formalism and economic regulation, the growth of legal liberalism, and the rights revolution.

  • Civil Externship I , JURI: 5970S, 5971S , Credit Hours: 4 - 6
    The objective of this course, in which various governmental and private organizations will provide placements for student externships, is to engage students in three primary learning experiences: direct exposure to the skills and methods of legal practice; focused application of legal concepts to real conflicts; and reflective appraisal of their own abilities, values, and professional goals. In addition to the field work provided by the externships, a clinic seminar will provide a jurisprudential context in which to consider and organize the learning gained in the field. Register for both 5970S (graded portion) and 5971S (pass/fail portion).

  • Civil Externship II , JURI: 5963S, 5964S , Credit Hours: 3 - 5
    The objective of this course, in which various governmental and private organizations will provide placements for student externships, is to engage students in three primary learning experiences: direct exposure to the skills and methods of legal practice; focused application of legal concepts to real conflicts; and reflective appraisal of their own abilities, values, and professional goals. In addition to the field work provided by the externships, a clinic seminar will provide a jurisprudential context in which to consider and organize the learning gained in the field. Register for both 5963S (graded portion) and 5964S (pass/fail portion).

  • Comparative Constitutional Law , JURI: 4185 , Credit Hours: 3
    Why do we have a constitution? In what ways is our constitution different than those adopted in other nations? Are there things our constitutions could do better? This course explores questions like these in a comparative perspective. We will explore the different ways nations have addressed the common problems constitutions attempt to solve, such as the structural organization of governments and the protection of individual rights. In doing so, we will consider the relationships between constitutions and judicial review; the significance of written versus unwritten constitutions; and the pros and cons of comparative consideration of such questions.  In doing so, we will study constitutional arrangements in the United States, and in other countries including Australia, Canada, France, Germany, Great Britain, India, Israel, Japan, and South Africa. Specific topics of study will include (1) the relationships between elected branches of government and courts under constitutional regimes that permit legislative override of constitutional decisions, (2) presidential compared to parliamentary systems of governance; (3) different forms of constitutional federalism, (4) approaches to protecting minority groups (for example, federalism, affirmative action for racial/ethnic/linguistic minorities, or group-based rights), (5) gender equality; (6) freedom of religion, (7) freedom of speech, and (8) positive social welfare rights.   The course will be graded through a combination of class participation, occasional written or in-class assignments, and a take-home exam.  There are no prerequisites for the course, although a familiarity with U.S. constitutional law would be helpful.

  • Conflict of Laws , JURI: 4410 , Credit Hours: 3
    This course examines the ways in which the courts of a nation or state seek to resolve legal disputes in which other nations or states have an interest.  The course will focus on two topics:  the jurisdiction of courts over persons or things involved in international or interstate legal disputes; and choice of law, the question of which jurisdiction’s law should apply in a given international or interstate legal dispute.  In addition, the course will cover the impact of the Constitution on jurisdictional issues, choice of law determinations, and the effect of state court judgments and decrees outside of the rendering state.  Other topics that could be covered include: conflicts between federal and state law; the effect given foreign nations’ judgments in domestic courts; and the extraterritorial application of federal law.

  • Constitutional Law I , JURI: 4180 , Credit Hours: 3
    This course addresses the meaning and impact of the Constitution of the United States, particularly with regard to the subjects of federalism, separation of powers, the judicial function and due process of law.

  • Constitutional Law II , JURI: 4190 , Credit Hours: 3
    This course focuses on constitutional protections of liberty and equality apart from protections that stem from principles of substantive and procedural due process. Subjects typically covered in the course include the Contract Clause, equal protection, freedom of expression, the right to free exercise of religion and the prohibition of laws respecting an establishment of religion.

  • Constitutional Law II , JURI: 4190E , Credit Hours: 3
    This course focuses on constitutional protections of liberty and equality apart from protections that stem from principles of substantive and procedural due process. Subjects typically covered in the course include the Contract Clause, equal protection, freedom of expression, the right to free exercise of religion and the prohibition of laws respecting an establishment of religion. This course will be taught as a blended learning course. It will meet each Tuesday in person. On Fridays, it will sometimes meet in person, and sometimes virtually. In addition, some Friday classes will be replaced by podcasts that students can listen to at their leisure, together with writing assignments and small group meetings. Please email Professor Levin with any questions (hlevin@uga.edu).

  • Constitutional Law Seminar , JURI: 4198 , Credit Hours: 2
    In this class, the focus will be on the division of powers between the federal government and the states.  The professor is now in the process of writing a book that focuses on present-day doctrine in this area of law, and student work in the class will be center on addressing subjects treated in the book – for example, the scope of the powers of Congress (the commerce power, the taxing power, the spending power, the Civil War Amendment enforcement powers, and other powers as well), the dormant Commerce Clause and other nation-safeguarding limits on state authority, and congressional preemption of state laws.  The present plan is to involve students in research-related tasks in a way that bears some resemblance to  working in a firm, with students taking on particular research assignments (handed out by the professor) connected up with this set of topics, including by reading, reviewing and supplementing with additional relevant materials draft chapters of the book. This class is NOT an appropriate vehicle for satisfying any writing requirements for upper level students.  Enrollment in the class will be capped at 10 students.

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