Family Law Courses

Qualifying course offerings can change from semester to semester. For a complete list for the current academic year, check the student handbook or contact the Law School Registrar.


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  • Bankruptcy , JURI: 4360 , Credit Hours: 3
    This survey course is intended not only for aspiring bankruptcy lawyers, but to allow future litigators and corporate lawyers to become familiar with both consumer and corporate bankruptcy. Students develop competency in both liquidation and reorganization of corporations, as well as the competing elections available to consumers in bankruptcy.

  • Children and International Law , JURI: 4745 , Credit Hours: 2
    Many aspects of international law concern issues related to children. The 1989 Convention on the Rights of the Child contains a catalog of ways that countries have pledged to protect children. Other treaties deal with specific topics; for instance, intercountry adoption, cross-border abduction, child labor, trafficking in children, and recruitment and use of child soldiers. The obligations set forth in those treaties are implemented both in national legislation and through global institutions including the United Nations, the International Labour Organization, and the International Criminal Court. This seminar will explore these developments at the intersection of family, labor, criminal justice, and international law. Grading will be based on students' research papers, which can satisfy the Advanced Writing Requirement.

  • Children in the Legal System , JURI: 4750 , Credit Hours: 3
    This course will focus on the legal status, rights, and disabilities of children in the American legal system. Initial emphasis will be on the condition of children in America, the development of the juvenile and family courts, and the development of children's constitutional rights in the home, in school, and in public. Significant attention will then be given to issues concerning child welfare, medical treatment, and juvenile delinquency. Other subjects that may be covered include status-based offenses and the representation of children. Grading will be based heavily on class participation in addition to a final examination.

  • Family Law , JURI: 5330 , Credit Hours: 3
    Significant aspects of family law, including marriage, divorce, separation, custody, and non-traditional families.

  • Family Violence Clinic , JURI: 5140S, 5141L , Credit Hours: 4 - 6
    Superior Court civil litigation clinic representing lower income victims of domestic abuse in obtaining protective orders. Students work as lay advocates and student practitioners to provide direct service to clients including screening and referral, interviewing, counseling, pleading and case preparation, negotiation, and advocacy at final hearings under the Student Practice Act. Class discussion centers on readings in texts and statutes relating to family violence, as well as on theory and practice of lawyering in a litigation/negotiation context. (See description of JURI 4500S for clinic grading policy.) Register for both 5140S (graded portion) and 5141L (pass/fail portion).

  • Lawyering for Children , JURI: 4755 , Credit Hours: 2
    This seminar will explore the responsibilities of lawyers for children and the factors that influence their interactions with child clients and lawyering decisions. We will focus on representation in child welfare, status offense, delinquency, and criminal cases. This course will not emphasize substantive law but rather lawyering theory and methods resulting from legal, social, policy, practical, and ethical considerations. Source materials may include judicial opinions, statutes, model rules/standards, scholarly research, case studies, and other materials, both legal and non-legal.

  • Same Sex Marriage Seminar , JURI: 5331 , Credit Hours: 2
    Where we are presently in the legal and social battles over same-sex marriage, how we got here, and where we will go from here.

  • Trusts and Estates , JURI: 4280, 4290 , Credit Hours: 3 each
    Substantive and procedural rules concerning holding and gratuitous disposition of wealth, including intestate succession, wills, will substitutes and inter vivos and testamentary trusts; substantive law of express and charitable trusts; remedies for wrongs relating to disposition of wealth; fiduciary powers, duties and liabilities; construction problems relating to future interests and powers of appointment.