Government, Public Policy and Regulation Courses

Qualifying course offerings can change from semester to semester. For a complete list for the current academic year, check the student handbook or contact the Law School Registrar.


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  • Environmental Law Practicum , JURI: 5289S , Credit Hours: 3
    Advanced research in legal control of environmental problems identified by watershed stakeholders/clients, with primary attention given to water and biodiversity issues.  There are no prerequisites, but Environmental Law or Natural Resource Law is recommended.

  • Federal Courts , JURI: 4570 , Credit Hours: 3
    This course will focus on the structure, jurisdiction, and powers of federal courts. Coverage will include: development of the federal court system; selection of judges; the judicial power under Article III; justiciability and the case-or-controversy requirement (standing, ripeness, mootness, political questions); the Erie doctrine; federal common law; challenges to jurisdiction; federal question jurisdiction; diversity jurisdiction; venue and transfer; special problems of removal jurisdiction.

  • First Amendment Clinic , JURI: 4200S, 4201S , Credit Hours: 2
    The First Amendment Clinic defends and advances the rights of free speech, press, assembly and petition via direct client representation and advocacy, particularly on behalf of individuals or organizations who may not otherwise have access to counsel with First Amendment expertise.  The Clinic also serves as an educational resource for organizations, journalists, students, government employees, and members of the public regarding issues of free expression, open access, and protection of newsgathering and reporting.  The clinic will provide law students with the opportunity to learn substantive areas of First Amendment law and develop concrete lawyering skills in the context of Constitutional litigation.  Such skills may include any combination of: client interviewing, case evaluation and research, negotiating with opposing parties, drafting pleadings and discovery requests, taking and defending depositions, participating in discovery and settlement conferences, identifying and coordinating with experts, motion practice, and oral advocacy.  In addition, students in the Clinic will have the opportunity to increase public awareness and understanding of the First Amendment.  This may include developing presentations to bring issues of free speech, press, petition, and assembly rights to non-lawyers; drafting writings that contribute to the public debate on matters implicating First Amendment freedoms; and helping to educate public officials and private citizens about the importance of protecting free expression and newsgathering.  The weekly seminar component of the clinic provides the opportunity to examine topical legal and legislative developments and debates relating to the rights of free speech, press, petition, and assembly.  The seminar also provides students with litigation skills training and will periodically be used to conduct “case rounds,” allowing students to discuss and collaboratively problem-solve issues related to their client work.  This is a one-semester clinic and is awarded 4 credits (2 graded and 2 pass/fail).

  • Food & Drug Law , JURI: 5635 , Credit Hours: 2
    This course provides an overview of laws and regulations governing development, manufacturing, and commercial distribution of drugs, biologic, medical device products, and animal health products and how they relate to the pharmaceutical, biotechnology, and medical device industry. This includes domestic regulatory requirements and various regulatory agencies and their jurisdiction.

  • Franchise Law , JURI: 4940 , Credit Hours: 2
    This course will introduce students to the franchise business model, with emphasis on the practical aspects of franchising.  The topics it will cover include the franchise regulatory system in the U.S., including laws governing franchise sales and disclosures and franchise relationship issues; and tangential areas, which will include a brief look at trademark and other intellectual property subjects, antitrust, commercial contract issues,  alternative forms of dispute resolution (mediation and arbitration), and common law contract and tort issues, as well as international franchising.  The course will also include opportunities to address hypothetical situations based on actual events and will emphasize policy considerations relating to franchise activities.

  • Georgia State and Local Government , JURI: 4905 , Credit Hours: 3
    This course explores principles of state and local government in Georgia.  Issues include organizational structures of local governments and the authority granted to by the U.S. and Georgia Constitutions.  Writing and research associated with practice in this area, and reflection on professional roles and responsibilities are elements of the course. This course meets the practical skills requirement. Students who have taken JURI 4900 are not eligible to take this course.

  • Higher Education Law , JURI: 5783 , Credit Hours: 3
    The course will examine the constitutional, statutory, administrative, and common-law principles that shape the structure, identity, and character of American public and private colleges and universities, including academic freedom, the rights and responsibilities of students and faculty, issues of identity and access, shared governance, accreditation and regulation.

  • Housing Law , JURI: 5540 , Credit Hours: 3
    The course covers selected issues in housing law and policy, drawn from both the private and public sectors. The course accommodates a number of different perspectives and interest areas, including non-legal disciplines related to housing. The course will be run seminar style, with assigned readings, directed discussion, and guest lectures. Each student will prepare a major research paper on a topic related to housing and will make an oral presentation of the paper to the class. There is no final exam.

  • Immigration Law , JURI: 5890 , Credit Hours: 3
    This course will examine American immigration law and policy. Topics considered include source and scope of Congressional power to regulate immigration; procedures for entry, exclusion, and deportation; refugees and asylum; current immigration law reform; and the role of states in regulating migrants. This course is intended both for those who are considering immigration law as a career and for those who want a general introduction to an important area of law that intersects with many areas of practice, including administrative, criminal, family, employment, and international.

  • Insurance Law , JURI: 4630 , Credit Hours: 2
    This is an experiential class based on a survey of liability and first party insurance coverage issues. The course will include a review of current and recurring issues in liability insurance, including commercial general liability insurance, professional liability insurance, directors and officers insurance, and umbrella and excess insurance. Within this context, coverage for subjects such as environmental claims, construction defect claims, and claims against corporate officers and directors for breach of fiduciary duty and mismanagement will be discussed. The course will also include a review of current and recurring issues under first party property policies. Within this general context, the course will also survey emerging insurance coverage issues, such as coverage for cyber liability claims and claims related to alleged climate change. To provide experiential learning, cases will be assigned in advance to be argued by teams of opposing counsel, one team representing the insurer and one team representing the insured. The class will be graded as follows: 10 percent based on class participation in arguing a pre-assigned case (this will be based on the substance of the argument and not on presentation skills); 40 percent based on a mid-term assignment to write a reservation of rights letter or coverage memorandum based on a written problem (which will include a self-evaluation component), and 50 percent on a one hour open book final exam.

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