International and Comparative Law Courses

Qualifying course offerings can change from semester to semester. For a complete list for the current academic year, check the student handbook or contact the Law School Registrar.


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  • International Taxation , JURI: 4710 , Credit Hours: 2
    Considers role of American lawyer acting as tax planner in context of transnational business transactions; U.S. income taxation consequences of foreign corporations and individuals doing business and investing in U.S.; similar tax consequences of American companies and individuals doing business and investing in foreign countries.

  • International Trade Laws , JURI: 5360 , Credit Hours: 3
    Examines national and international policies and laws relating to international trade and investment.

  • Law and Institutions of the European Union , JURI: 5830 , Credit Hours: 2
    History of the European Union, law-making and administrative institutions and processes, economic sectoral policies, including competition and state aids, transport and agriculture; internal market, freedoms (movement of goods, workers, capital, services); harmonization of national laws; external economic trade policy; impact of Single European Act and Treaty on European Union.

  • Laws of War , JURI: 4645 , Credit Hours: 3
    Examined in this course will be laws and customs intended to regulate war - not only when and whether law permits resort to armed conflict, but also national and international legal rules and regimes governing how war is to be waged and when actors may be sanctioned for violating those rules.

  • Military Law , JURI: 4390 , Credit Hours: 2
    The course will focus on the system of military justice in the United States, and its sources of authority under the U.S. Constitution, the Uniform Code of Military Justice (UCMJ), and the Manual for Courts-Martial (MCM). The course will also address the history of military justice in the United States and particularly the UCMJ since its enactment in 1951; the complementary relationship between military discipline and the UCMJ; scope of military jurisdiction; the different types of crimes established in the UCMJ; military trial practice and procedure , including a comparison between the evidentiary and procedural rules under the UCMJ/MCM and the civilian federal courts; the appellate courts established under the UCMJ; the role of the military lawyer and the organization and role of the several Judge Advocate General departments within DoD; the role of the military commander under the UCMJ; significant military cases reaching the U.S. Supreme Court and other federal courts; discussion of the use of military commissions in the Global War on Terror and a comparative analysis of military justice systems of other nations.

  • Moot Court Competition: International Moot Court , JURI: 5042 , Credit Hours: 2
    Preparation, handling of international law moot court case and representation of hypothetical states before international legal tribunal. Topics covered impart knowledge of international legal reasoning, novel research and effective oral advocacy. Enrollment extended by permission. This course is graded S/U.

  • Oxford Research Tutorial , JURI: ---- , Credit Hours: 3
    For more information about the Oxford program, visit the program webpage: http://law.uga.edu/georgia-law-oxford This course is modeled on the format of the justly renowned Oxford tutorial. Each tutor will meet periodically with a small number of students. Meetings will be devoted to planning or revising the students' individual research papers, to be completed by the end of the semester. Law students will participate in groups of three or four with their individual tutors (professors).

  • Public International Law , JURI: 4640 , Credit Hours: 3
    This introductory course will examine the doctrine, theory, and evolution of International Law. Once focused narrowly on relations between nation-states, the field now encompasses myriad legal norms and mechanisms regulating the global activities not only of states, but also of human beings, corporations, and intergovernmental and nongovernmental organizations.

  • Refugee & Asylum Law , JURI: 5894 , Credit Hours: 2
    The world’s refugees – persons forced to flee home countries – topped 15 million in 2014. This course will examine laws and policies governing forced migration. To be studied: international and U.S. legal systems and institutions; substantive, procedural, and evidentiary aspects of an asylum claim; causes; and trafficking and other refugee experiences.

  • Selected Topics in International Law: NATO , JURI: 5999 , Credit Hours: 1
    This course will examine a pivotal global security organization: the North Atlantic Treaty Organization, to which the United States and twenty-nine other countries belong. To be explored: NATO’s history, founding treaty, and other legal doctrines, including the law of armed conflict; missions in Europe and in countries like Afghanistan and Libya; and responses to emerging threats like pandemics and cyber conflicts. NATO will be considered within the global system of nation-states, international organizations, and nongovernment entities. Particular attention will be paid to the roles of lawyers in NATO and in national governments that work with NATO. The course will conclude with a role-playing crisis simulation. Grading will be based on demonstrated engagement with the readings and issues, as well as participation in class discussion and role-playing exercises.

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