Litigation (Civil): Practice and Procedure Courses

Qualifying course offerings can change from semester to semester. For a complete list for the current academic year, check the student handbook or contact the Law School Registrar.


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  • Administrative Law , JURI: 4320 , Credit Hours: 3
    Focuses on law controlling federal and state administrative action. Along with constitutional restraints, student is asked to consider statutory and judicially formulated rules for the administrative process. Control over administrative discretion and enforced accountability are major themes. Attention is devoted to federal and state Administrative Procedure Acts.

  • Advanced Evidence Seminar , JURI: 5980 , Credit Hours: 2
    Advanced study and writing work on evidence and litigation topics, including subjects like hearsay, experts, final arguments, and motions for a new trial. Involves study and discussion of problem areas and research, writing, and preparation as well as defense of a major paper on a specific litigation problem. Potential paper topics include matters like husband/wife privilege, expert witness standards in federal and Georgia practice, and the limits of closing argument. At the election of the student, the paper can be prepared in a manner which will fulfill the Advanced Writing Requirement of the law school.

  • Advanced Topics in Corporate Litigation , JURI: 4581 , Credit Hours: 1
    This course examines advanced topics in Delaware corporate law, focusing on the functioning of a corporation and transfers of control. Students will be given the opportunity for hands on experience in litigating corporate cases through oral argument.  This course will be pass/fail, based on class participation and a short opinion paper that focuses on class lectures and the materials examined in connection with the litigation practice exercise.

  • Advanced Trial Practice , JURI: 5700 , Credit Hours: 2
    Trials of advanced or multi-party cases, such as adverse possession, commercial litigation, conspiracy and product liability actions; some expanded problems in evidence and trial procedure. Drafting projects include pre- trial documents, motions in limine and post-trial motions.

  • Appellate Advocacy , JURI: 4150 , Credit Hours: 2
    This course is designed to help students become successful appellate advocates. Students will be presented with a hypothetical appellate problem from which they will prepare a brief and oral argument. Each student must select (or be assigned), a teammate for the brief writing and oral argument components of the course. The briefs will be entered in the Talmadge Best Brief Competition and students are required to participate in the first two rounds of the Talmadge Moot Court Competition. Students will also be required to compete for a position on the interscholastic Moot Court Team. Grades will be based on evaluations of the following items: (1) appellate brief, (2) videotaped argument, (3) competition argument, and (4) writing exercise(s). Limited to 2L students.

  • Appellate Litigation Clinic (Summer Semester) , JURI: 4157S , Credit Hours: 2
    This course picks up where the Appellate Litigation Clinic II leaves off in the spring semester. Students will draft petitions for certiorari in cases where the Circuit Courts of Appeals have denied our clients relief, prepare clemency petitions to the Office of the United States Pardon Attorney when appropriate, and write merits briefs to the Circuit Courts of Appeals and Board of Immigration Appeals for any cases still pending at the appellate court level during the summer term. Overall, the course will teach students the intricacies of appellate practice, including how to write persuasively, how to communicate with clients, and how to learn and follow the applicable procedural rules.

  • Appellate Litigation Clinic I & II , JURI: 4155S, 4156S , Credit Hours: 3 each
    This clinic is designed to train students to be appellate litigators. It is a year-long clinic. Credit for the first semester generally requires participation in the second semester. It is open only to third year law students. Students will get three credits for each semester, and the class will meet for one two-hour seminar per week. The first semester will be pass/fail, and the second semester will have the traditional grading system. The clinic will essentially operate as a small firm and will accept clients with cases before both federal circuit courts of appeals and the Board of Immigration Appeals. Students will work in teams of two or three to review the record of the case, identify the issues that should be raised in the appeal, draft the briefs (both opening brief and reply brief), and do the oral argument if permitted and if oral argument is scheduled. This clinic will require a significant time commitment, particularly around the time that briefs are due and oral arguments are scheduled. Briefing schedules for the different teams will vary. The subject matter of the cases before the Courts of Appeals will vary. Obviously, the cases before the Board of Immigration Appeals will be immigration cases (primarily appeals of deportation orders). Enrollment in the clinic is by application only.

  • Bankruptcy , JURI: 4360 , Credit Hours: 3
    This survey course is intended not only for aspiring bankruptcy lawyers, but to allow future litigators and corporate lawyers to become familiar with both consumer and corporate bankruptcy. Students develop competency in both liquidation and reorganization of corporations, as well as the competing elections available to consumers in bankruptcy.

  • Civil Externship I , JURI: 5970S, 5971L , Credit Hours: 2 - 6
    The objective of this course, in which various governmental and private organizations will provide placements for student externships, is to engage students in three primary learning experiences: direct exposure to the skills and methods of legal practice; focused application of legal concepts to real conflicts; and reflective appraisal of their own abilities, values, and professional goals. In addition to the field work provided by the externships, a clinic seminar will provide a jurisprudential context in which to consider and organize the learning gained in the field. Register for both 5970S or 5963S (graded portion) and 5971L or 5964S (pass/fail portion).

  • Civil Externship II , JURI: 5963S, 5964S , Credit Hours: 2 - 6
    The objective of this course, in which various governmental and private organizations will provide placements for student externships, is to engage students in three primary learning experiences: direct exposure to the skills and methods of legal practice; focused application of legal concepts to real conflicts; and reflective appraisal of their own abilities, values, and professional goals. In addition to the field work provided by the externships, a clinic seminar will provide a jurisprudential context in which to consider and organize the learning gained in the field. Register for both 5970S or 5963S (graded portion) and 5971L or 5964S (pass/fail portion).

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