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Library Video Tutorials

The law library offers many resources for Georgia Law students and faculty. To assist patrons in using the library's resources more effectively, the library has created a series of video tutorials. The folllowing tutorials convey instructions on how to access and use our catalog and eBooks. They also include helpful search tips and explanations that make understanding what the library has to offer and taking full advantage of those offerings easier.

 

GAVEL Video Tutorials

eBook Video Tutorials


Part 1 introduces you to the law library's online catalog and describes the types of library resources you can expect to find there.
Video Transcript
Hello and welcome to part 1 of the Alexander Campbell King Law Library’s video tutorials for GAVEL. 
 
In this video we’ll introduce you to GAVEL… Let’s get started.
 
GAVEL is the online catalog of the University of Georgia School of Law's library—think of it as an inventory of the things we have for you to use. 
 
You can search it to find out if we have a particular printed book, a journal, an electronic book or a video. It also contains everything we have on microfiche, microfilm, and in many of our online databases.  
 
We’ve also included direct access to select materials that are freely available on the Internet, like many EU and US-government documents. 
 
Additionally, you can use GAVEL to search for course reserves.
 
Not everything within our databases has a GAVEL record, and the catalog does not universally index book chapters, articles collected in book form, or articles within journals. 

 

Part 2: Introduction to Searching GAVEL Part 2 introduces you to the basics of searching GAVEL, and discusses the three most common ways to search.
Video Transcript
Hello and welcome to part 2 of the Alexander Campbell King Law Library’s video tutorials for GAVEL. 
 
In this video we will explain how to search GAVEL.
 
GAVEL is accessible from center box on the library’s homepage (at law.uga.edu/library) OR you can use the GAVEL homepage (at gavel.law.uga.edu). 

 
You can search GAVEL from either location by entering keywords into the default search box or by selecting to search by the author, title, Library of Congress subject heading, call number, ISBN or SuDoc number. 
 
Here we’ll talk about the first three, which account for all non-staff searching done in GAVEL:
 
1. A keyword search will search anywhere in the record for the terms you enter—maybe it’s in a summary, maybe it’s part of the title, or maybe it’s in the general description. This is the broadest type of search you can do.    
2. Title searches will look not only for the main title of an item but if a book contains chapters written by different people, it will search those chapter titles as well. 
3. Author searches include results much broader than the person that writes the text. In an author search, you can look for editors, directors or actors of movies, jurisdictions (in the case of codes and constitutions, session laws), sponsoring bodies, and conference names.
 
GAVEL contains some handy search tips under the “Help” tab, located at the top right of any GAVEL search page. 
 
You can group common words together into specific phrases by enclosing them in quotation marks. To illustrate the usefulness, a keyword search for common law (as two terms) yields 4,022 results while the grouped term “common law” yields 1,847 results.
 
If you want to know about the other search methods, watch the third video in this series “Advanced Searching in GAVEL”.

 

Part 3: Advanced Searching in GAVEL Part 3 explains four more advanced methods of searching GAVEL: 1. Call Numbers 2. Subject Headings 3. SuDoc Numbers and 4. ISBN / ISSN Numbers. 
Video Transcript
Hello and welcome to part 3 of the Alexander Campbell King Law Library’s video tutorials for GAVEL. In this video we will explain four more advanced searches you can do in GAVEL:
1. Call Number
2. Subject Heading (Subject)
3. SuDoc Number (Gov’t Doc Number)
4. ISBN / ISSN (Barcode)
 
These are separate indexes that look at one or two specific lines of code in our records to give you very precise search results. But these indexes also require some specialized knowledge of the library tools like the Library of Congress subject headings and Library of Congress classification. Let’s get started:
Call Number and Subject Searches
Call number and Subject searches are suitable in the unlikely event that you know the Library of Congress classification range or official subject heading for your topic… KFG460 and “Housing—Law and legislation—Georgia” is for Georgia housing law, HV has a lot of our public welfare and criminology stuff, which you would use “Public welfare” or “Criminals” to find, and JK covers US government and public administration entered as “United States—Politics and government.” These numbers and terms are assigned by librarians who have looked over the item carefully and determined what it is mostly about.
 
If you remember the common law example from our second video in this series, Intro to Searching GAVEL, we found around 4000 results when we searched by keyword for common law as two terms, and narrowed the results down to under 2000 when we searched for the keyword phrase “common law”. Searching for the same terms “Common law” as a Library of Congress subject heading really fine-tunes this search, yielding just over 150 results. Very precise!
Su Doc Number / Gov’t Doc Number Searches
SuDoc number is the Superintendent of Documents call number. It’s used in place of a Library of Congress classification number on many government documents.
 
ISBN / ISSN Searches
ISBN/ISSN are super specific searches when you know these numbers, usually found as a barcode on the back cover of a book.
 
If you would like learn about searching for individual articles, watch the fourth video in this series “GAVEL and Beyond”.

 

Part 4 talks about the GAVEL & Beyond search, why it is a better choice when searching for articles in journals, and explain how you can narrow your results with this search.
Video Transcript
“While GAVEL is incredibly powerful, it is not a good choice for finding articles on a topic. GAVEL can tell which journals and reviews we have, but it cannot tell you the specific contents of each issue…
that’s why we have GAVEL & Beyond!
 
GAVEL & Beyond is like searching GAVEL and GALILEO simultaneously and you’ll probably get more results than you want. 
 
GAVEL & Beyond has many ways that you can refine your search by clicking through some options in the “Refine Results” section, located on the left-side of the screen. 
 
Narrow your results by taking a look at the “Geography” (think Jurisdiction for legal materials) or at the “Database” (to find HeinOnline, LexisNexis Academic, GAVEL or Index to Legal Periodicals).”

 

Part 5: Searching for Course Reserves Part 5 explains how to search for course reserves by instructor name and course name, as well as how to access electronic reserves.
Video Transcript
“Hello and welcome to the Alexander Campbell King Law Library’s video tutorials for GAVEL. In this video we will talk about using GAVEL to search for course reserves. 
 
Like the other GAVEL searches we discussed in the previous parts of this tutorial series, you can search course reserves directly from the library’s homepage (by instructor’s name) or on the GAVEL homepage (gavel.law.uga.edu). 
 
Both interfaces default to searching by instructors’ name, but you could also select by course name (by clicking on the down arrow).
 
 If you don’t get the name exactly correct, it will drop you into a list of course names that you can browse. 
 
Access to materials in electronic reserve require your myID and password for verification of class membership.
 
To learn more about other GAVEL searches for locating library resources, check out the other videos in this tutorial series.
Part 1: Introduction to eBooks
Part 1 explains how to identify eBooks from a keyword search in the library's catalog, Gavel, and how to open the eBook in ebrary.
Video Transcript
Hello and welcome to the Alexander Campbell King Law library’s video tutorial for e-books.
 
In part 1 of this tutorial we will show you how to search for an ebook using a keyword and how to open that eBook in ebrary. So let’s get started!
 
First you should begin on the law library’s website. Go to law.uga.edu/library
 
Next you are going to click on the law library catalog link, GAVEL. It is on the right hand side.
 
Next we are going to search for a key word using GAVEL’s keyword search.
 
And right away we are going to pull up relevant resources. 
 
So here at the top we can see that this is a computer file which means that this is an eBook.
 
Click on the item title and click on in ebrary eBook collection.
 
It is going to pull up this ebook. We can see the cover and we’re going to have our table of contents over to the right. 
 
You can also flip through the pages using these arrows at the top. We can also increase the zoom here if we need a larger view of the text. 
 
I can also get that same access online link by just clicking the access online directly from the search results.
 
And as with anything at the library if you have any trouble or questions feel free to consult a librarian. 
 

 

Part 2 explains how to download and print eBooks from within ebrary, including how to create a personal ebrary account.
Video Transcript
Hello and welcome to the Alexander Campbell King Law Library’s video tutorial for eBooks. 
 
In Part 2 we are going to show you how to download an eBook to your computer, or other device and also how to print that eBook should you choose to do so. 
 
So to begin, we are going to start where we left off inside of this eBook. You’re going to first select the download button and immediately a box will pop up to let you know that you must be signed in to your personal eBrary account in order to use this feature.
 
So if this is your first time using ebrary, in order to set up your account you’re going to go to “sign in” at the top right, you’re going to come down here to the “create an account” link. Click on that link. 
 
And you would fill in the information needed, agree to the terms and create a new account. 
 
Your account has been successfully created. 
 
Now we’re going to return to our eBook. Now that our account has been created and we’re signed into ebrary, when we click the download button this time a different box will appear. 
 
You can see that you’re able to download the entire document for a limited time, 7 days, using Adobe Digital Editions, or you can download a PDF of a specific chapter or range of pages. 
 
Although the chapter and page ranges are limited to 60 pages, you can keep the PDF indefinitely. 
 
So for now we’re going to choose a chapter (formation lessons, chapter number 6), choose OK and a box will pop up asking if you would prefer to save the file or to open the file with Adobe. 
 
For now we’re going to choose “open file” and immediately this pops up, you can see ebrary’s watermark here. 
 
From here we could save it in a location on our computer that we can remember.
Or we could choose to print it. 
 
And as with anything at the library, if you have any trouble or questions, feel free to consult a librarian. 

 

Part 3: Five Helpful Tips When Using eBooks Part 3 presents five helpful tips when using eBooks, including locating bibliographic information, searching for terms, highlighting, copying and pasting, and more.
Video Transcript
Hello and welcome to the Alexander Campbell King Law Library’s video tutorial for eBooks. 
 
In part 3 we will show you five helpful tips when using eBoks.
 
First, to locate bibliographic information, scroll to the bottom of the page and just below the table of contents on the bottom right hand side you’ll see all of the bibliographic information for any eBook. 
 
Now if you are searching for a specific term, you can use the search document feature at the top of the table of contents of any eBook. You want to make sure that you have the box checked for highlighting search terms, then type in your term and click “search document”.  You can use the magnifying glass previous and next buttons at the top of the page to navigate to different occurrences of your term. 
 
Now once you’ve found a passage of text that you might like to cite, you can choose to highlight it. Simply drag your mouse over the portion of text and then select a highlighter color from the top of the screen.  This will highlight the text and save it as a note in your notes panel. You can also add a specific note to any highlighted text in an eBook by choosing the highlighter icon with a notes box next to it. This will allow you to type in a little note that you can remember, and again it is going to save it to your notes panel. We can get to our notes by selecting the panel which is located on the top right. The tab right next to the table of contents. If you go there you will see that any notes or highlights that you have made have been automatically saved there. 
 
These are also automatically saved to your bookshelf so that you can return to them with just one click, even after you have left the eBook. To get to your bookshelf, where all of your notes and highlights are stored, use the bookshelf tab at the top left, right next to quick view. From here you can choose to delete notes and highlights, you can also use it to organize notes from various eBooks into folders. So here we’re going to label some of our folders according to topic. We’ll choose biography and copyright. And to add items to these folders, simply drag and drop the cover of the eBook into the appropriate folder. And then we can see that we can click on the folders to filter through our saved notes and highlights. 
 
Finally, if you are including citations in a paper or an article you are working on, you can simply highlight sections of the text by dragging your mouse over it, just as if you were going to highlight it to save a note within ebrary, and you can choose to copy by right-clicking and choosing “copy”, then bring your word processor up and use “command + c” or  right click to paste. It will automatically include the right citation for you when you choose to paste, including a URL for the document. 
 
And as with anything at the library, if you have any trouble  or questions, feel free to consult a librarian. 

 

Part 4 helps you discover over 2,700 eBooks in ebrary, by showing you how to navigate to ebrary from the library's website as well as how to fine tune and sort your results.
Video Transcript
Hello and welcome to the Alexander Campbell King Law Library’s video tutorial for eBooks. 
 
In part 4 we will explore discovering eBooks in ebrary. Let’s get started.
 
Starting on the library’s website at law.uga.edu/library click on the “research resources” link located at the bottom of the white space on the right hand side of the screen. This will take you to the library’s research guides.
 
You can also access the research guides from the law library’s catalog GAVEL by rolling your mouse over the “law library links” menu at the top middle of the screen and selecting the research resources link. Once you are in the library’s research guides click on the “eBooks via ebrary” link form the A to Z list of databases. 
 
Now that we are in ebrary we can do a search for all eBooks available by leaving the search box blank and clicking one of the search buttons on the page. 
 
A results list containing more than 2,700 eBooks will appear. 
 
If you are searching for a specific topic, feel free to type in the keyword into one of the search boxes at the top or you can use the check boxes to limit the results to one or more subjects. 
 
We’ll choose “law” and “United States” and you can see that our number of eBooks in our results list has gone from over 2,700 to only 1,600. You can continue to select more boxes and your results will continue to filter based on those categories until you’ve narrowed your results down to a more reasonable number of eBooks. 
 
You can also change the sorting of your results from relevance to publisher or to date by selecting a different sorting option on the right hand side of the page. 
 
And when you’ve located an eBook that you’re interested in simply click on the title and that eBook will open. 
 
And as with anything at the library, if you have any trouble or questions, feel free to consult a librarian. 

 

Legal Tech Session: Focus on Excel

Legal Tech Session: Focus on PDFs

Equip yourself with the technical know-how you need to be practice-ready. In addition to discussing the legal tech audit, this session focused on how-to skills for using Microsoft Excel in the legal profession. Recorded live on Tuesday, January 13, 2015, from 11:30 - 12:20 in Classroom B.

 

Equip yourself with the technical know-how you need to be practice-ready. In addition to discussing the legal tech audit, this session focused on how-to skills for using PDFs and Adobe Acrobat X Pro in the legal profession. Recorded live on Tuesday, January 27, 2015, from 11:30 - 12:20 in Classroom B.

 

Legal Tech Session: Focus on Word

 
Equip yourself with the technical know-how you need to be practice-ready. In addition to discussing the legal tech audit, this session focused on how-to skills for using Microsoft Word in the legal profession. Recorded live on Tuesday, February 10, 2015, from 11:30 - 12:20 in Classroom B.