Former U.S. ambassador to speak on humanitarian intervention, Syria & international law

Lee A. Feinstein

Tuesday, September 17, 2013

Writer/Contact: Cindy H. Rice, 706/542-5172, cindyh@uga.edu

Athens, Ga. – Former U.S. Ambassador Lee A. Feinstein will present “Humanitarian Intervention and International Law” at the University of Georgia School of Law on Oct. 3 at 12:30 p.m. in the Larry Walker Room of Dean Rusk Hall.

During his talk, Feinstein will discuss the changing notions of international law in light of the experiences of recent humanitarian interventions, and he will explore the implications of these changes in light of the use of chemical weapons in Syria.

Feinstein is currently teaching a course on contemporary issues in international and national security law as the school’s Carl E. Sanders Political Leadership Scholar for the fall 2013 semester. He comes to Georgia Law after serving as the U.S. ambassador to the Republic of Poland, a position he held from September 2009 to October 2012. Feinstein has also served one secretary of defense and two secretaries of state, including as principal deputy director of the policy planning staff and senior adviser in the Office of the Under Secretary of State for Arms Control and International Security.

A foreign policy adviser for multiple presidential candidates and a frequent lecturer and commentator domestically and internationally, Feinstein has taught at George Washington University and at the City University of New York. He is also the co-author of the book “Means to an End: U.S. Interest in the International Criminal Court.”

He earned his bachelor’s degree from Vassar College, his master’s in political science from the Graduate Center of the City University of New York and his law degree from Georgetown University, where he graduated cum laude.

The Sanders Political Leadership Scholar position is named for Georgia's 74th Governor and 1948 Georgia Law alumnus, Carl E. Sanders. It was created so law students could learn from individuals who have distinguished themselves as leaders in politics or other forms of public service.

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