Electives Courses

Qualifying course offerings can change from semester to semester. For a complete list for the current academic year, check the student handbook or contact the Law School Registrar.


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  • Anatomy of an M&A Deal , JURI: 4215 , Credit Hours: 3
    Provides overview of typical asset sale transaction and the attorney's role. Students will acquire an understanding of the transaction process and related legal and business issues. Students will review, draft, and negotiate typical transaction documents. Evaluation will be based primarily on drafting projects in lieu of a final exam.

  • Animal Law , JURI: 4827 , Credit Hours: 3
    Regarding the appropriate treatment of and uses for animals, the course will look at a variety of topics, possibly including: regulatory schemes for wildlife, including hunting regimes and protection of endangered species; regulation of domesticated animals for food, research, and entertainment; regulations of veterinary practices; and the role that animals play in traditional areas of law including property, torts, and criminal law.

  • Anti-Terrorism and Criminal Enforcement , JURI: 5875 , Credit Hours: 1
    This course will deal with the difficult but important issue of how we protect the American homeland form terrorism in a way tat is consistent with the constitution and criminal laws. There are no prerequisites, but Constitutional Law and Criminal Procedure are helpful.

  • Antitrust Law , JURI: 4340 , Credit Hours: 3
    When can producers cooperate, and when must they compete? Is the NFL—or NCAA—a beneficial collaboration, a consumer-harming cartel, or a hybrid of both? Antitrust law, born in the shadow of the Second Industrial Revolution’s titanic steel and oil companies, provides answers to questions such as these. The course explores the evolution of this common-law-like statutory regime, in which courts strike a dynamic balance among disparate policies, including consumer protection, allocative efficiency, and the innovation-spurring rewards of monopoly. Using major cases and enforcement-agency pronouncements, we make reasoned assessments of the probable legality of assorted business practices in varied sectors, from sports leagues to software firms, and from mining to medical care. A few basics of economic reasoning routinely appear in the cases and commentaries, so we devote some attention to them; but have no fear, it’s straightforward stuff.

  • Appellate Advocacy , JURI: 4150 , Credit Hours: 2
    This course is designed to help students become successful appellate advocates. Students will be presented with a hypothetical appellate problem from which they will prepare a brief and oral argument. Each student must select (or be assigned), a teammate for the brief writing and oral argument components of the course. The briefs will be entered in the Talmadge Best Brief Competition and students are required to participate in the first two rounds of the Talmadge Moot Court Competition. Students will also be required to compete for a position on the interscholastic Moot Court Team. Grades will be based on evaluations of the following items: (1) appellate brief, (2) videotaped argument, (3) competition argument, and (4) writing exercise(s). Limited to 2L students.

  • Appellate Litigation Clinic (Summer Semester) , JURI: 4157S , Credit Hours: 2
    This course picks up where the Appellate Litigation Clinic II leaves off in the spring semester. Students will draft petitions for certiorari in cases where the Circuit Courts of Appeals have denied our clients relief, prepare clemency petitions to the Office of the United States Pardon Attorney when appropriate, and write merits briefs to the Circuit Courts of Appeals and Board of Immigration Appeals for any cases still pending at the appellate court level during the summer term. Overall, the course will teach students the intricacies of appellate practice, including how to write persuasively, how to communicate with clients, and how to learn and follow the applicable procedural rules.

  • Appellate Litigation Clinic I & II , JURI: 4155S, 4156S , Credit Hours: 3 each
    This clinic is designed to train students to be appellate litigators. It is a year-long clinic. Credit for the first semester generally requires participation in the second semester. It is open only to third year law students. Students will get three credits for each semester, and the class will meet for one two-hour seminar per week. The first semester will be pass/fail, and the second semester will have the traditional grading system. The clinic will essentially operate as a small firm and will accept clients with cases before both federal circuit courts of appeals and the Board of Immigration Appeals. Students will work in teams of two or three to review the record of the case, identify the issues that should be raised in the appeal, draft the briefs (both opening brief and reply brief), and do the oral argument if permitted and if oral argument is scheduled. This clinic will require a significant time commitment, particularly around the time that briefs are due and oral arguments are scheduled. Briefing schedules for the different teams will vary. The subject matter of the cases before the Courts of Appeals will vary. Obviously, the cases before the Board of Immigration Appeals will be immigration cases (primarily appeals of deportation orders). Enrollment in the clinic is by application only.

  • Atlanta Civil Externship Semester in Practice , JURI: 5981S, 5982S , Credit Hours: 10 (5 hours graded and 5 hours pass/fail)
    This course is a ten-credit course: two credits in a weekly two-hour seminar and eight credits earned at an assigned full-time placement in the Atlanta area for students to gain experience and work.

  • Atlanta Corporate Counsel Externship Semester in Practice , JURI: 5993S, 5994S , Credit Hours: 10 (5 hours graded and 5 hours pass/fail)
    This course is a ten-credit course: two credits in a weekly two-hour seminar and eight credits earned at an assigned full-time placement in the Atlanta area for students to gain experience and work.

  • Banking Regulation , JURI: 5470 , Credit Hours: 3
    This course will survey the evolution of banking regulation, as well as recent developments that have intensified scrutiny on banks. The primary focus will be on Federal regulation of banks in regard to both traditional and non-traditional banking activities as well as the potential conflicts between state and Federal law. Desired course outcomes: 1) learn the complex laws under which banks operate and why banks have traditionally been regulated much more heavily than other industries; 2) understand how those regulations are structured, how compliance is monitored, and how to recognize potential regulatory issues that arise in banking environment; 3) appreciate the ethical responsibilities that banks have to customers and the communities that they serve.

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