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Course Offerings

You will find a broad and challenging curriculum at Georgia Law - nearly 170 courses are offered, although not all of the listed courses are taught each year. First-year students are just as likely to encounter a tenured or chaired faculty member in the classroom as they are a junior professor.  Distinguished visitors and adjuncts supplement the faculty and diversify the upper-level curriculum. Not all listed courses are offered each semester. Periodically, other courses are offered.  Unless otherwise noted, all law courses carry the prefix "JURI." 

CURRENT STUDENTS: For the upcoming academic year, awlays visit the Class Schedules & Registration webpage for requirement lists and guidelines including 2L Writing, Advanced Writing, Capstone, and Practical Skills requirements.

To search by JURI number or course name, visit our custom course search.

Watch a selection of faculty video Insights for guidance in choosing courses.

  • Estate Planning , JURI 4560 , Credit Hours: 2 , Prerequisite: JURI 4280 and JURI 4590
    Planning effective and tax-efficient transfers of property interests based on client type, intended beneficiary, type of transfer, and asset type. Attention is given to preparation of estate plans and drafting of appropriate instruments. Focus on restrictions imposed by client goals, economic environment, and the law of trusts, wills, and federal taxation.

  • Ethics in Litigation , JURI 5440 , Credit Hours: 2 , Prerequisite: Prerequisite JURI 4300 or 4300E
    This course examines the various ethical issues that can arise in the context of civil litigation, with particular emphasis on the pretrial phase of the process. Specific areas of coverage include: dealing with prospective clients; pre-filing investigation; ethics in pleading and motion practice; discovery ethics; witness interviews and preparation; negotiation and settlement; ethical challenges presented by technology; and ethical duties as “officers of the court.”  Final grades will be based on the following: (1) leading at least one class session; (2) performance on a take-home final examination; and (3) class participation.  Law and Ethics of Lawyering is a prerequisite for this course.  Computer use is prohibited during class – Students will not be permitted to utilize laptop computers or any other electronic or wireless device during class for any purpose, including taking notes.

  • Evidence , JURI 4250 , Credit Hours: 3
    Covers rules governing admission and exclusion of testimony, documents, exhibits, expert proof and experiments in criminal and civil cases. Also concerned with mechanics of proof, proper form of objections, order of proof, and burden of proof in criminal and civil trials. The subjects of hearsay, relevancy, character evidence and the law of witness impeachment and cross-examination are explored in detail.

  • Family Law , JURI 5330 , Credit Hours: 3
    Significant aspects of family law, including marriage, divorce, separation, custody, and non-traditional families. When taught by Professor Scartz, enrollment will be a maximum 20 J.D. students, 2L and 3L only (this course is not a 1L elective). This class is taught using collaborative pedagogy (also known as cooperative learning) requiring consistent, immersive engagement in the classroom and with the course materials. The class covers all significant aspects of family law, including the definition of family, marriage, separation and divorce, child custody, property distribution, and domestic violence. Students work together to understand relevant procedural and substantive law, to determine how the law applies to modern families, and to articulate persuasive arguments in support of their evaluation of cases. Students will be assessed on projects throughout the semester and a final exam.

  • Federal Courts , JURI 4570 , Credit Hours: 3
    This course will focus on the structure, jurisdiction, and powers of federal courts. Coverage will include: development of the federal court system; selection of judges; the judicial power under Article III; justiciability and the case-or-controversy requirement (standing, ripeness, mootness, political questions); the Erie doctrine; federal common law; challenges to jurisdiction; federal question jurisdiction; diversity jurisdiction; venue and transfer; special problems of removal jurisdiction.

  • Federal Income Tax , JURI 5120 , Credit Hours: 3
    Introduction to policy and practice of federal income taxation of individuals, including determination of gross income, allowance of deductions and credits, sales and dispositions of property, capital gains and losses, and problems of attribution of income.

  • Fiduciary Law: Emerging Issues and New Directions , JURI 5595 , Credit Hours: 1
    This one-credit, pass-fail course will examine cutting-edge topics in fiduciary law. The first six hours of instruction will focus on the fiduciary law governing trusts and trustees and will be taught by Professor Thomas Gallanis, the Allan D. Vestal Chair in Law at the University of Iowa and the Verner F. Chaffin Visiting Chair in Fiduciary Law at UGA.   Among the topics covered will be: (1) the trustee’s duty of prudent investment, the measure of the trustee’s liability for breach of that duty, and the rise of the “directed” trust; (2) the trustee’s duty of impartiality between beneficiaries of income and beneficiaries of principal, the trustee’s power to adjust between income and principal, and the use of unitrusts as an alternative to traditional income-and-principal trusts; (3) the widespread use of discretionary trusts, and the range of a trustee’s discretion; and (4) the emerging phenomenon of trust “decanting.”  Recent uniform acts will be studied, including the Uniform Trust Decanting Act (2015), the Uniform Directed Trust Act (2017), and the Uniform Fiduciary Income and Principal Act (2018)

  • First Amendment Clinic , JURI 4200S , Credit Hours: 2
    The First Amendment Clinic defends and advances the rights of free speech, press, assembly and petition via direct client representation and advocacy, particularly on behalf of individuals or organizations who may not otherwise have access to counsel with First Amendment expertise.  The Clinic also serves as an educational resource for organizations, journalists, students, government employees, and members of the public regarding issues of free expression, open access, and protection of newsgathering and reporting.  The clinic will provide law students with the opportunity to learn substantive areas of First Amendment law and develop concrete lawyering skills in the context of Constitutional litigation.  Such skills may include any combination of: client interviewing, case evaluation and research, negotiating with opposing parties, drafting pleadings and discovery requests, taking and defending depositions, participating in discovery and settlement conferences, identifying and coordinating with experts, motion practice, and oral advocacy.  In addition, students in the Clinic will have the opportunity to increase public awareness and understanding of the First Amendment.  This may include developing presentations to bring issues of free speech, press, petition, and assembly rights to non-lawyers; drafting writings that contribute to the public debate on matters implicating First Amendment freedoms; and helping to educate public officials and private citizens about the importance of protecting free expression and newsgathering.  The weekly seminar component of the clinic provides the opportunity to examine topical legal and legislative developments and debates relating to the rights of free speech, press, petition, and assembly.  The seminar also provides students with litigation skills training and will periodically be used to conduct “case rounds,” allowing students to discuss and collaboratively problem-solve issues related to their client work.  This is a one-semester clinic and is awarded 4 credits (2 graded and 2 pass/fail).

  • First Amendment Clinic , JURI 4201S , Credit Hours: 2
    The First Amendment Clinic defends and advances the rights of free speech, press, assembly and petition via direct client representation and advocacy, particularly on behalf of individuals or organizations who may not otherwise have access to counsel with First Amendment expertise.  The Clinic also serves as an educational resource for organizations, journalists, students, government employees, and members of the public regarding issues of free expression, open access, and protection of newsgathering and reporting.  The clinic will provide law students with the opportunity to learn substantive areas of First Amendment law and develop concrete lawyering skills in the context of Constitutional litigation.  Such skills may include any combination of: client interviewing, case evaluation and research, negotiating with opposing parties, drafting pleadings and discovery requests, taking and defending depositions, participating in discovery and settlement conferences, identifying and coordinating with experts, motion practice, and oral advocacy.  In addition, students in the Clinic will have the opportunity to increase public awareness and understanding of the First Amendment.  This may include developing presentations to bring issues of free speech, press, petition, and assembly rights to non-lawyers; drafting writings that contribute to the public debate on matters implicating First Amendment freedoms; and helping to educate public officials and private citizens about the importance of protecting free expression and newsgathering.  The weekly seminar component of the clinic provides the opportunity to examine topical legal and legislative developments and debates relating to the rights of free speech, press, petition, and assembly.  The seminar also provides students with litigation skills training and will periodically be used to conduct “case rounds,” allowing students to discuss and collaboratively problem-solve issues related to their client work.  This is a one-semester clinic and is awarded 4 credits (2 graded and 2 pass/fail).

  • Food & Drug Law , JURI 5635 , Credit Hours: 2
    This course provides an overview of laws and regulations governing development, manufacturing, and commercial distribution of drugs, biologic, medical device products, and animal health products and how they relate to the pharmaceutical, biotechnology, and medical device industry. This includes domestic regulatory requirements and various regulatory agencies and their jurisdiction.

  • Foreign Affairs and National Security Law , JURI 4425 , Credit Hours: 3 , Prerequisite: JURI 4180
    Examines how U.S. law both constrains and is constrained by U.S. foreign relations and the foreign policy-making process. The course considers issues relating to separation of powers, federalism, individual rights, and the influence of international norms on US constitutional development.

  • Foundations of American Law , JURI 3233 , Credit Hours: 3
    An introduction to legal reasoning, fundamental law and policy argumentative tools, the various types of legal institutions, the administrative state, and the interpretation of statutes and the Constitution. Foundational study will lead to legally sophisticated analyses and discussion concerning recently argued or decided Supreme Court cases.

  • Franchise Law , JURI 4940 , Credit Hours: 2 , Prerequisite: JURI 4210
    This course will introduce students to the franchise business model, with emphasis on the practical aspects of franchising.  The topics it will cover include the franchise regulatory system in the U.S., including laws governing franchise sales and disclosures and franchise relationship issues; and tangential areas, which will include a brief look at trademark and other intellectual property subjects, antitrust, commercial contract issues,  alternative forms of dispute resolution (mediation and arbitration), and common law contract and tort issues, as well as international franchising.  The course will also include opportunities to address hypothetical situations based on actual events and will emphasize policy considerations relating to franchise activities.

  • From Contraband to Commodity: Regulating the New Marijuana Markets , JURI 5586 , Credit Hours: 2
    Even a few years ago, marijuana was uniformly made contraband by both federal and state law. The legal status of marijuana is now in flux, among and between state and federal governments. This course explores regulation of these new marijuana markets, using economic analysis and other regulatory law-and-policy tools.

  • Fundamentals of Mergers & Acquisitions , JURI 4214 , Credit Hours: 1 , Prerequisite: JURI 4210
    This course is designed to give the student working familiarity with how a merger or acquisition transaction is negotiated and structured, from inception to post-closing, with a heavy emphasis on how the major deal documents allocate risks between the parties through pricing structure, representations, covenants and conditions. This class will be graded pass/fail.

  • Game Theory and the Law , JURI 5595 , Credit Hours: 1
    The course will present the basic models of game theory and their legal applications, with special emphasis on interactive learning through participating in games (both online and in-class) and discussion of the dynamics of decision-making present within each game. Towards this purpose, students will be asked to register to a course-specific website through which "problem sets" will be posted – games requiring students to input their choices and providing class statistics and results to be discussed in the following lesson. Participation in games should facilitate learning – both in pushing students to tackle strategic questions within each game, and in requiring thought as to legal situations in which similar dynamics arise.  Course material will focus on non-cooperative game theory (where each actor is presumed to be a self-utility-maximizing individual or firm), though some models of cooperative game theory will be presented as well (formation of coalitions among members). Application to legal issues will be discussed, both based on scholarly writings and on students' input as to real-life situations where similar strategic interactions arise (relying both on case law and non-legal everyday experience). No prior knowledge of game theory or economics is presumed, and all technical know-how necessary for understanding, presenting, and solving game structures will be included in the course itself. The focus of this course is onunderstanding and being able to apply game theory's insights to everyday and legal decision-making, rather than theoretical knowledge alone.

  • Georgia Election Law , JURI 5590 , Credit Hours: 1
    This course examines the relationships between law, elections, and government focusing on Georgia law. It will cover laws and regulations governing political candidates, their campaigns, state campaign finance, public officials, ethics in government, and the regulation of the political process. Regulation of lobbyists will be examined, as will independent committees and political action committees. Additionally, the course will look at the process of Georgia judicial campaigns and appointments, and the regulation of public officials once in office.

  • Georgia History for Lawyers , JURI 4871 , Credit Hours: 3
    A survey of the people, places, and events that form the history of the State of Georgia from prehistoric times to the present, including the ways in which history has intersected with Georgia and U.S. Law. Students will be expected to produce a paper examining in depth an issue of legal importance in Georgia History.

  • Georgia Legal Research , JURI 4089 , Credit Hours: 1
    A hands-on exploration of Georgia legal research resources. The course will cover primary and secondary sources, advanced searching skills, topical research and cost saving strategies. Students will complete research for simulated client matters: preparing civil and criminal cases for trial, completing a business transaction and representing a client in an administrative hearing.

  • Georgia Practice and Procedure , JURI 4620 , Credit Hours: 3
    An advanced course in Civil Procedure. Explores in depth the Georgia Civil Practice Act and Long-Arm Statute, as interpreted by Georgia appellate court decisions, along with selected constitutional and statutory provisions allocating jurisdiction among trial courts, venue, and validity of judgments.

  • Georgia State and Local Government , JURI 4905 , Credit Hours: 3
    This course explores principles of state and local government in Georgia.  Issues include organizational structures of local governments and the authority granted to by the U.S. and Georgia Constitutions.  Writing and research associated with practice in this area, and reflection on professional roles and responsibilities are elements of the course. This course meets the practical skills requirement. Students who have taken JURI 4900 are not eligible to take this course.

  • Georgia Trial Court Practice , JURI 5590 , Credit Hours: 2
    Georgia Trial Court Practice is designed to introduce the fundamental skills of trial practice in Georgia for both civil and criminal practice. Subjects include trial preparation, organization, jury selection, opening statements, direct and cross examinations of witnesses, introducing and handling of exhibits, expert witnesses, closing statements, motions practice, courtroom etiquette, decorum and personal mannerisms. Emphasis will be placed on Georgia trial practice through lectures, demonstration, performance of techniques and procedure through mock trial exercises. Each session includes a classroom instructional component, specific to Georgia court rules and procedure as well as opportunity for student performance integrating doctrine, theory, skills, and legal ethics.

  • Global Economic Governance , JURI 5883 , Credit Hours: 1
    The architecture and rules of global and transnational economic law will be the focus of this course. Topics may include international trade, international investment law, international financial regulation, international monetary law, and/or international business transactions. International, regional, bilateral, and unilateral systems, as well as formal and informal arrangements and rules, will be compared. This course is a part of the Global Governance Summer School in Belgium.

  • Global Governance , JURI 5885 , Credit Hours: 3 , Prerequisite: JURI 4270 or 4640 or 4645 or 5360 or 4670 or 5894 or 5750 or 4745, or 4675 or permission of instructor
    In a globalizing world, the range of issues with cross-border implications only expands, from finance to trade, environment to human rights, food safety to sports. This upper-level course in International Law examines how and why different legal regimes have developed to govern these issues and when they succeed or fail.

  • Global Governance Overview , JURI 5881 , Credit Hours: 1
    Global governance has emerged as a key concept in debates on how to address transnational challenges. Applying a multidisciplinary perspective, this overview course will familiarize students with the various actors, institutions, policies, and sets of rules that shape today’s global governance fora and have an impact on international policy-making levels. This course is a part of the Global Governance Summer School in Belgium.

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