Electives Courses

Qualifying course offerings can change from semester to semester. For a complete list for the current academic year, check the student handbook or contact the Law School Registrar.


View more Course Concentrations | Visit the Course Offerings Search Form
  • Intellectual Property Survey , JURI: 5050 , Credit Hours: 3
    This course provides an introduction to the four primary types of intellectual property protection: copyright, patent, trademark, and trade secret. Students gain a basic understanding of the various grounds for and limitations of such protections. This course serves as both an introduction to the field for those anticipating further study and a survey of the area for those planning to focus on a different area of law. NOTE: One cannot take the IP Survey (JURI 5050) after having taken any two of the following courses: Copyright Law (JURI 4430), Patent Law (JURI 4920), or Trademark Law (JURI 4930). If the IP Survey course is taken first, any or all three of the advanced intellectual property courses can be taken.

  • Interdisciplinary Environmental Law Practicum , JURI: 5290 , Credit Hours: 4
    Advanced research in legal control of environmental problems, with primary attention given to water and biodiversity issues. Law students work with graduate students from other disciplines including ecology, forestry, agriculture and environmental design, to address problems identified by watershed stakeholders.

  • Internal Investigations , JURI: 5646 , Credit Hours: 3
    Course examines how corporations and their personnel investigate their own conduct.  Course will develop students’ understanding of the roles of management, the board of directors, and their respective counsel in corporate investigations and their interplay with government regulators, such as the Department of Justice and the Securities and Exchange Commission.

  • International Arbitration , JURI: 4720 , Credit Hours: 2
    This course will examine the legal regime governing international commercial arbitration. Topics will include the enforcement of arbitration agreements, arbitral procedure and the enforcement of arbitral awards. The course also will consider how to draft arbitral clauses.

  • International Business Transactions , JURI: 4675 , Credit Hours: 3
    This course will examine the legal regime governing a variety of international business transactions. Topics include international sales, international finance, and anti-corruption legislation.

  • International Civil Litigation , JURI: 5810 , Credit Hours: 3
    Globalization has increased the frequency of transboundary civil disputes, whether between two companies like Microsoft and Sony or in business dealings with sovereigns like China. More than ever, the next generation of lawyers needs to know the law governing topics such as personal jurisdiction over foreign companies, forum nonconveniens, discovery in international disputes, forum selection clauses and foreign judgments.

  • International Criminal Law , JURI: 4270 , Credit Hours: 3
    Examined will be the development and jurisprudence of international criminal law: its origins in post-World War II Nuremberg and Tokyo war crimes tribunals; its evolution in post-Cold War tribunals for the former Yugoslavia, Rwanda, Sierra Leone, Cambodia, and Lebanon; and its siblings, noncriminal efforts like truth commissions. A focus will be the 10-year-old permanent International Criminal Court: its core crimes and ways persons may be held liable or defend against liability; the roles of actors including ICC prosecutors and defenders, judges, victims, partner organizations like NATO and the United Nations, and countries that belong to the ICC; and the relationship between the ICC and nonmember countries like the United States.

  • International Environmental Law , JURI: 5750 , Credit Hours: 3
    Interdisciplinary introduction to international environmental law and policy, focusing on how international environmental regimes emerge, develop and influence behavior. Selected case studies on topics such as acid rain, global warming, whaling, deforestation, and trade in endangered species.

  • International Human Rights , JURI: 4670 , Credit Hours: 2
    How can a community mend after armed conflict or similar violence? How can countries that once waged war—the United States and Vietnam or Cuba, for instance—achieve the reconciliation and reparations necessary for political, social, and economic cooperation? What role do memory and memorials play in this process? In search of answers, this seminar will examine the transitional justice jurisprudence of international criminal tribunals and regional human rights regimes, as well as writings by jurists and social theorists. Students may seek advance writing credit for their seminar papers, which will form a substantial part of the final grade.

  • International Intellectual Property Seminar , JURI: 4261 , Credit Hours: 3
    This seminar will explore the principles and policies supporting the international protection of intellectual property rights, as well as the sources of those rights. We will focus on the international treaty arrangements for copyright, patent, and trademark protection, as well as on questions of enforcement, jurisdiction, and choice of law. The course will also examine the function of international intellectual property organizations, recent developments in the European Union, and issues relating to establishing and enforcing intellectual property rights in less developed nations. No background in science, engineering, or international law is required for this course.

Pages