Electives Courses

Qualifying course offerings can change from semester to semester. For a complete list for the current academic year, check the student handbook or contact the Law School Registrar.


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  • Legislation and Regulation , JURI: 4883 , Credit Hours: 3
    Our legal system comprises many institutions, all tasked with making and interpreting various kinds of laws. This course ventures beyond common law courts to examine legislatures, executive agencies, and other kinds of lawmakers. It will ask why and how we regulate and how lawmaking institutions are related to one another

  • Legislation and Statutory Interpretation , JURI: 4880 , Credit Hours: 3
    This basic survey course has two major goals. First, though we think of ourselves as a common law country, most of our laws come from statutes. Lawyers, in whatever kind of law practice they engage, find themselves confronted regularly with statutes which must be made sense of. Therefore, the ability to read, interpret, and argue from statutes is a fundamental skill for any attorney. The first goal of this course, then, is to introduce the practical skills and basic theory for working with statutes. Second, and more broadly, students may have noticed that "law school" might be better described as "court school." That is, there is much education about courts, judges, and judicial process, but far less about how most of our laws are made. The second goal of this course, then, is to explore the legislative process and to begin to understand how the three branches of the federal government (and most states, as well) speak to one another. The course will combine standard law school teaching methods (lecture and Socratic discussion) with interactive classroom exercises. Most of the course grade will be based on an exam, but classroom engagement and perhaps one or two (very very short) written assignments will factor in as well.

  • Legislation and Statutory Interpretation , JURI: 4880E , Credit Hours: 3
    This basic survey course has two major goals. First, though we think of ourselves as a common law country, most of our laws come from statutes. Lawyers, in whatever kind of law practice they engage, find themselves confronted regularly with statutes which must be made sense of. Therefore, the ability to read, interpret, and argue from statutes is a fundamental skill for any attorney. The first goal of this course, then, is to introduce the practical skills and basic theory for working with statutes. Second, and more broadly, students may have noticed that "law school" might be better described as "court school." That is, there is much education about courts, judges, and judicial process, but far less about how most of our laws are made. The second goal of this course, then, is to explore the legislative process and to begin to understand how the three branches of the federal government (and most states, as well) speak to one another. The course will combine standard law school teaching methods (lecture and Socratic discussion) with interactive classroom exercises. Most of the course grade will be based on an exam, but classroom engagement and perhaps one or two (very very short) written assignments will factor in as well. This course will be taught as a blended learning course. It will meet each Tuesday in person. On Fridays, it will sometimes meet in person, and sometimes virtually. In addition, some Friday classes will be replaced by podcasts that students can listen to at their leisure, together with writing assignments and small group meetings. Please email Professor Levin with any questions (hlevin@uga.edu).

  • Life Cycle of a Corporation , JURI: 5080 , Credit Hours: 3
    This class follows the life-cycle of a corporation from inception through venture financing, IPO, M&A, and bankruptcy, aiming to provide an overview of corporate practice. The class incorporates Harvard Business School cases and emphasizes group work and participation. Beyond the substantive coverage, the course introduces students to the various kinds of drafting a corporate practice requires. Students are evaluated on class participation, 3 drafting exercises, and a final paper and presentation.

  • Major Works in Legal Theory (formerly Classics in Legal Theory) , JURI: 5595 , Credit Hours: 1 (year long course, meeting once per month)
    This course introduces students to books that have made a difference in various fields of law—books that change the way experts, scholars, or the general public think about an important legal topic.  Students will read and discuss seven books over the course of the school year. The list changes each year, but past works include Alexander’s “The New Jim Crow,” Hart’s “A Concept of Law,” Nussbaum’s “Hiding from Humantiy,” Walzer’s “Just and Unjust Wars,” and West’s “Re-Imagining Justice.” This is the course known among some graduates as “Law School Book Club.”  The goal of the course is to give interested students an opportunity to think more deeply about complex legal, political, philosophical and historical ideas, and to discuss those ideas with a variety of professors. The course spans both semesters and is pass/fail.

  • Mass Tort Litigation , JURI: 4143 , Credit Hours: 3
    This course focuses on the legal problems and issues associated with the unique, growing phenomenon of mass torts, e.g., the B.P. Oil Spill, the 9/11 litigation, tobacco, Agent Orange, Dalkon Shield, breast implants, asbestos personal injury litigation, Holocaust litigation etc. We will examine such issues as consolidation of state and federal litigation in one forum, judicial determination of who should appropriately manage the litigation for both plaintiffs and defendants, how courts determine legal causation, strategic and ethical considerations for plaintiffs and defendants, strategies for litigation funding, alternatives to judicial resolution, and issues associated with Congressional intervention. This class will explore the overriding question of whether the courts can dispense individual justice in cases involving thousands of litigants.

  • Mass Tort Seminar , JURI: 5790 , Credit Hours: 3
    This seminar focuses on the legal problems and issues associated with the unique, growing phenomenon of mass torts, e.g., the B.P. Oil Spill, the 9/11 litigation, tobacco, Agent Orange, Dalkon Shield, breast implants, asbestos personal injury litigation, etc. We will examine such issues as consolidation of state and federal litigation in one forum, judicial determination of who should appropriately manage the litigation for both plaintiffs and defendants, how courts determine legal causation, strategic and ethical considerations for plaintiffs and defendants, strategies for litigation funding, alternatives to judicial resolution, and issues associated with Congressional intervention. This class will explore the overriding question of whether the courts can dispense individual justice in cases involving thousands of litigants. Course requirements will include writing a substantial research paper as well as actively participating in class discussion.

  • Media Law , JURI: 5576 , Credit Hours: 3
    Examines a variety of legal issues affecting the news media. After an introductory examination of traditional constitutional issues arising out of the First Amendment and a philosophical look at the justifications for free speech protection, the course explores how these traditional principles are balanced against competing interests not only in constitutional law but also in common law and statutory regulations. Issues dealt with include prior restraint, defamation, privacy, access to court proceedings, access to government meetings and documents, the reporter’s privilege, and intellectual property issues affecting the press. In addition this course addresses issues specific to electronic media, although it focuses on the communicative, as opposed to the administrative or regulatory aspects of this emerging area of law.

  • Mediation Practicum I , JURI: 5975 , Credit Hours: 3
    The course consists of in-class, simulation-based training, including interactive training on the mediation process, the role and competencies of the mediator, ethical and regulatory rules governing mediation and a series of specific topics of mediation practice. It also includes an introduction to small claims court and to the primary legal issues that students will encounter in practice. This course is designed to satisfy the requirements of the Georgia Office of Dispute Resolution ("GODR") for the training of court-certified mediators.

  • Mediation Practicum II , JURI: 5976S , Credit Hours: 3
    This clinical course includes four primary components: 1) solo mediation of selected cases in the Clarke County Magistrate Court, 2) weekly two-hour class sessions which will combine in-depth assessments of completed cases and integrated discussions of readings in mediation theory and practice, 3) advanced readings on mediation and dispute resolution theory, and 4) regular periodic reflective writing in the form of two journals and a learning appraisal. Students will meet individually with the clinical supervisor for individual feedback and evaluation.

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