Electives Courses

Qualifying course offerings can change from semester to semester. For a complete list for the current academic year, check the student handbook or contact the Law School Registrar.

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  • Regulation, Politics, and the Environment , JURI: 5595 , Credit Hours: 1
    The seminar will explore the challenges of contemporary environmental regulation. It will start by examining the concept of regulation and its theoretical underpinnings. We will explore in this context some of the basic concepts of the economic and philosophical theory of regulation including public goods, externalities and coordination. We will then move to examine some of the basic instruments of modern regulation, distinguishing between command and control mechanisms, economic instruments, final demand instruments and liability rules. Drawing on this general introduction we will develop a typology of regulatory failures exploring some of the common explanations for these failures (e.g., regulatory capture, epistemic incompetence, scientific uncertainty). This theoretical discussion will be accompanied by examination of various case studies, including both national and global examples.

  • Remedies , JURI: 4550 , Credit Hours: 3
    Remedies is a transubstantive course that crosses the traditional boundaries within private law, and between private and public law. The course requires students to reconsider from a new perspective the fundamental tort, property and contract law doctrines they learned in their first-year. In particular, they are asked to focus on the relief they are seeking for their clients and the alternative forms of relief that might be available. After all, remedies are the denominator common to every area of the law that imposes liability. The objective of this course is gain an understanding of the relationship between liability and remedy across many areas of the law, looking at both regularities and divergences.

  • Same Sex Marriage Seminar , JURI: 5331 , Credit Hours: 2
    Where we are presently in the legal and social battles over same-sex marriage, how we got here, and where we will go from here.

  • Secured Transactions , JURI: 4950 , Credit Hours: 3
    Basic commercial law course dealing with secured financing when the collateral consists of personal property, including goods, fixtures, intangibles, and intellectual property. Focus is on Article 9 of the Uniform Commercial Code. The course should help students to develop their skills in statutory analysis and in understanding and planning business transactions.

  • Securities Litigation and Enforcement , JURI: 5430 , Credit Hours: 3
    This course examines private, SEC, and criminal enforcement of the federal securities laws. Topics considered include fraud on the market, market manipulation, international reach of the fraud provisions, and securities arbitration, as well as developments under the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act and the Sarbanes-Oxley Act. This course is altogether distinct from, and does not presuppose knowledge of, the course in securities regulation.

  • Securities Regulation , JURI: 4960 , Credit Hours: 3
    This overview of the federal securities laws focuses primarily on the Securities Act of 1933. Topics covered include the definition of a security, the registration of securities offerings with the Securities & Exchange Commission, exemptions from registration, secondary distributions, and civil liabilities.

  • Select Topics in Judicature , JURI: 4581 , Credit Hours: 1
    Selected areas of judicial administration and judging that are too narrow for a full-semester course. Topics may include judicial case management, the judicial role in criminal and civil matters, the role of judges or courts in society and literature, comparative approaches to judging in different legal systems, etc.

  • Select Topics in Judicature: Persuading the Judge and Jury , JURI: 4581 , Credit Hours: 1
    Sprring 2018: This course will give students the opportunity to discuss and to practice parts of a trial such as jury selection, opening and closing statements, witness examinations, appellate briefs, and appellate arguments with Judge Bernice Donald.  Judge Donald has been: a judge on Tennessee’s General Sessions Criminal Court; a United States Bankruptcy Judge for the Western District of Tennessee; and a United States District Court Judge for the Western District of Tennessee.  She currently is a judge on the United States Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit.  She will share her trial and appellate insights and give feedback as you perform related exercises.   

  • Selected Topics in International Criminal Law , JURI: 5595 , Credit Hours: 1
    The course will examine key issues and dilemmas relating to International Criminal Law (ICL). It will begin by surveying both ICL’s development in recent times as well as its substantive law. It will then explore unique aspects of ICL, including: the collective nature of the crimes, the difficulty of investigating such crimes, and the difficulty to enforce ICL. Various doctrines exclusive to ICL will be examined in order to demonstrate how ICL’s norms have been shaped by its exceptional features. The course will conclude by refuting the myth that ICL was ‘born’ at Nuremberg, by uncovering ICL’s centuries-long forgotten history and establishing its current relevancy.

  • Selected Topics in Jurisprudence , JURI: 4230 , Credit Hours: 2
    Selected topics in legal theory and the philosophy of law. This course involves more detailed studies of particular theoretical approaches and/or more particular applications to practice areas than do general survey courses, such as JURI 4199 (Modern American Legal Theory) and JURI 4870 (American Legal History). Those courses are not prerequisites or co-requisites but might, depending on topics covered, provide a good background to enhance appreciation of this course.