Electives Courses

Qualifying course offerings can change from semester to semester. For a complete list for the current academic year, check the student handbook or contact the Law School Registrar.

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  • Sentencing , JURI: 4256 , Credit Hours: 2
    This course will introduce students to the evolving field of U.S. Sentencing Law. The United States has the highest documented incarceration rate in the world. At the moment, there are over 7.3 million people in the U.S. on probation, in jail or prison, or on parole. This equals 3.2% of U.S. adult residents (equivalent to 1 out of every 31 people in the U.S.). Further, 2.3 million U.S. adult residents are incarcerated (which equals 1% of U.S. adult residents). This class will broadly examine the principles and practices of sentencing. While federal sentencing law has received the most attention in recent years, particularly since the creation of the Federal Sentencing Guidelines, it is impossible to understand the current dynamics or the likely future trends of federal sentencing without also looking more broadly. As such, along with federal sentencing, this course will examine state sentencing systems and alternatives to sentencing in both the federal and state systems. Furthermore, as incarceration is the central tenet of American sentencing law, this course will introduce students to the U.S. prison system.

  • Sentencing Seminar , JURI: 4255 , Credit Hours: 1
    An examination of the overarching goals of sentencing in the criminal justice system, policy considerations driving sentencing, constitutional and statutory limitations on sentencing schemes, and the basics of sentencing practice in state and federal courts in this country.

  • Sexual Orientation and Gender Law , JURI: 4822 , Credit Hours: 2
    This course will examine the evolving constitutional and legal rights of the LGBTQ community.  We will begin by exploring the historical evolution of the constitutional rights of gays and lesbians, examining doctrines of privacy and equality as they have evolved to protect LGBTQ individuals.  The course will explore ongoing legal battles over religious freedom and nondiscrimination laws, the rights of transgender and gender-nonconforming people, employment discrimination, and family law questions (including parentage, adoption, divorce, and alternatives to marriage).  We will examine these issues critically, including by addressing concerns over federalism, free exercise, the democratic process, and the proper role of the courts.  Throughout the course, students will explore key due process and equal protection concepts and learn how to frame and develop constitutional arguments.  This seminar will satisfy the Capstone requirement.   

  • Sociology of Law , JURI: 4820 , Credit Hours: 3
    Characterized by a scientific rather than normative emphasis, legal sociology focuses on empirical patterns of legal behavior, such as initiation and winning of law suits, origins and content of rules, and the development of legal institutions. Most literature has addressed case-level variation and the course will reflect this. But instead of analyzing cases in terms of the applicable rules and policies, lectures and readings will invoke the social characteristics of participants (e.g., social ties, status, marginality, reputation and organizational affiliations) to predict and explain case outcomes. Sociological techniques by which social differentials in cases (discrimination) might be minimized will also be studied. Modern American materials will be emphasized.

  • Solo & Small Firm Practice , JURI: 4625 , Credit Hours: 2 (3L students only)
    This course provides a roadmap for the new lawyer to establish a solo law practice or to join with other lawyers in creating or expanding a small law firm. This course is limited to 3L students only.

  • Sports Law , JURI: 5550 , Credit Hours: 2
    This course will concentrate on the regulation and oversight of intercollegiate athletics in the United States by the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA). Coverage will include the history of the organization, the differences between the divisions, Title IX compliance, the NCAA's legislative processes, initial eligibility requirements, graduate success rate and academic progress rate standards , the reporting and investigation of alleged violations, the processes for the adjudication of infractions, and the NCAA's penalty structure. In the Fall 2016 semester, this course will have a traditional exam. In the Spring 2017 semester, students will make presentations and may use their papers to satisfy the upper-level writing requirement. Sports Law Syllabus for Spring 2017

  • State and Local Government , JURI: 4900 , Credit Hours: 2
    This course explores common principles of state and local government with a strategic focus on key aspects of Georgia law.  The course will combine practical advice with some theory.  Issues addressed include organizational structures of local governments, authority granted to them by the U.S. and Georgia Constitution, and various ways they exercise (or attempt to exercise) their power.  The class may explore these concepts generally and in the context of specific subject areas including but not limited to annexation, home rule, immunity, incorporation, intergovernmental agreements, employment, service delivery strategies, regulatory authority, taxation, and zoning.  This course will introduce students to varied forms of writing and research associated with a professional practice in this area and reflect on professional roles and responsibilities.

  • State and Local Taxation , JURI: 5000 , Credit Hours: 2
    A study of principles and problems of state and local taxation in our federal system. Examines ad valorem property taxes, corporate and personal income taxes, sales and use taxes, and other state and local taxes imposed on business. Federal constitutional limitations on state tax power explored in detail and considerable attention is devoted to problems of dividing income of multi-jurisdictional corporations among the states.

  • State and Local Taxation Seminar , JURI: 5010 , Credit Hours: 2
    An in-depth study of selected problems in the field of state and local taxation.

  • Summer Externship , JURI: 5965E, 5966L , Credit Hours: 2 - 4
    The Summer Externship supports students working in governmental, judicial and private non-profit placements through a focused program of reading, reflection and professional development. Students gain direct exposure to the skills and methods of legal practice, focused application of legal concepts to real conflicts, and reflective appraisal of their own skills and abilities. each student engages in an ongoing conversation with the clinic supervisor through journals and interviews; together with readings, this contact expands and deepens the practical and jurisprudential learning gains in the field. Register for both 5965E (graded portion) and 5966L (pass/fail portion).