Electives Courses

Qualifying course offerings can change from semester to semester. For a complete list for the current academic year, check the student handbook or contact the Law School Registrar.


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  • Deals , JURI: 5085 , Credit Hours: 4
    This course examines complex corporate transactions and contracts – that is, “deals.”  The first component presents a framework for evaluating alternative transaction structures, including transaction costs, information economics, risk sharing and incentives, property rights, and finance.  Students then apply these concepts to “live” deals negotiated by alumni in transactional legal practice.  Corporations is a prerequisite for the course. Securities Regulation is helpful, but not required.

  • Design and Construction Law , JURI: 5530 , Credit Hours: 2
    This course examines the legal framework of the design and construction process. The course focuses on application of tort and contract law to contract formation and performance issues, and will examine legal remedies available to construction project participants. Course will have a final exam.

  • Dispute Resolution & Systems Design , JURI: 5730 , Credit Hours: 3
    In a world of settlement, this course prepares students to effectively represent clients through an understanding of the design and strategic election between ADR processes, and development of best practices as counsel in each process. Both private processes (arbitration, negotiation, mediation) and public tribunals (domestic and international) are studied.

  • Document Drafting: Contracts , JURI: 5850 , Credit Hours: 3
    An introduction to drafting, analyzing, and revising contracts. You cannot take this course if you are currently taking or have taken Legal Drafting for Transactional Practice.

  • Document Drafting: Litigation , JURI: 5455 , Credit Hours: 3
    This course will provide an introduction to and overview of the litigation process leading up to trial, with an emphasis on the written work product that attorneys must generate during the course of litigation, including pleadings, discovery, and selected procedural and substantive motions.

  • Document Drafting: Special Topics in Estate Planning , JURI: 4565 , Credit Hours: 3
    This course will teach the fundamentals of document drafting by focusing on selected topics in estate planning. Among other things, the course will require students to produce successive drafts of documents and provisions that incorporate feedback from the professor.

  • Document Drafting: Survey , JURI: 4851 , Credit Hours: 3
    An overview of drafting non-litigation documents. Develops the skills required to draft statutes, wills, and contracts. The course also focuses on gathering information to provide a factual basis for the preparation of such documents and drafting such documents within the existing legal framework.

  • Document Drafting—Compromise and Settlement , JURI: 5457 , Credit Hours: 2
    This course focuses on moving disputing parties from an agreement in principle to an enforceable settlement document. Students learn the elements that make agreements complete and binding, the drafting skills that make them clear, and common issues that undermine enforceability. Students discuss contested agreements and complete written assignments.

  • Education Law , JURI: 5781 , Credit Hours: 3
    This course covers numerous legal and policy questions related to the American educational system. Relevant sources of law include the U.S. Constitution and state and federal statutes and administrative materials. Topics include school funding, school choice, student and teacher speech rights, policy debates, and others. The course will be conducted with an emphasis on developing practical lawyering skills.

  • Elder Law , JURI: 5720 , Credit Hours: 3
    Aspects of federal and state elderly programs and problems; special risk populations; significance of older population growth; representation of elderly clients; guardianship; lifetime estate management; testamentary estate disposition; living wills and "right to die" debate; health and long-term care; housing, transportation and employment policies; public assistance.

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