Electives Courses

Qualifying course offerings can change from semester to semester. For a complete list for the current academic year, check the student handbook or contact the Law School Registrar.

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  • Supervised Research , JURI: 5190 , Credit Hours: 2
    Supervised Research involves an in-depth written analysis of a legal issue under close faculty tutoring and supervision. It requires significant legal research, original thinking and analysis, and must produce final paper of a kind and quality similar to that found in law review articles.

  • Sustainable Business: Transactions and Strategy , JURI: 5667 , Credit Hours: 2
    This course will introduce students to the concept of environmental sustainability, the legal challenges facing businesses in attaining environmental sustainability, the incentives for business to achieve sustainable commerce, and possible means that governments may have to encourage or stimulate environmentally sustainable commerce.

  • Tax Crimes , JURI: 5611 , Credit Hours: 2
    Criminal tax investigations and prosecutions; constitutional defenses to the compulsory production of evidence; attorney-client privilege, confidentiality and other defenses available to taxpayers and third parties.

  • Tax Seminar , JURI: 5130 , Credit Hours: 2
    This course will cover federal individual income tax issues that lawyers often deal with in practice.  It will also cover tax policy issues that relate to incremental and fundament tax reform proposals that are under consideration at the time of the course. 

  • Technology Skills for Legal Practice , JURI: 4086 , Credit Hours: 1
    A focused, hands-on exploration of the use of technology in the practice of law. The course will cover the impact of technology on law and practice and the specific technology understanding and skills required of the modern lawyer. Students will complete hands on projects using practice management, document assembly, presentation and office productivity software.

  • Telecommunications Law & Policy , JURI: 5886 , Credit Hours: 3
    This course explores the rules and standards of U.S. telecommunications law. We examine the market structures and regulatory treatment of a number of related electronic communications technologies—from wireline and wireless telephony to t.v. to the Internet backbone—whose convergence and recombination continue to challenge frameworks first established decades ago. We focus most intently on the work of the Federal Communications Commission, the lead agency in the field, paying special attention to its implementation of the 1996 Telecommunications Act. We also consider the ways that antitrust, intellectual property, and free speech principles constrain telecommunications law and policy.

  • The Federalist Papers , JURI: 4573 , Credit Hours: 2
    This course focuses on the framing and ratification of the United States Constitution and the role of The Federalist Papers in that process. This class will NOT satisfy the writing requirement.

  • The History of the Common Law , JURI: 4876 , Credit Hours: 4
    This course surveys the development of the common law, courts, and legal profession in England and the US, with emphasis on the ways that common law and legal practice have diverged in these countries. The course concludes by comparing how both countries structure and regulate the practice of law today.

  • The Law of American Health Care , JURI: 5626 , Credit Hours: 3
    Examination of the United States health care delivery system as a regulated industry. A survey of a variety of legal issues affecting health care providers and their interactions with commercial insurers, government health care programs, and state and federal regulators.

  • The Law of Newsgathering , JURI: 5590 , Credit Hours: 1
    The competing values of personal privacy and government transparency are proving increasingly difficult to balance in an era of online publishing, archiving and searchability. This course will survey recent developments in the law of news-gatherers' access to information and public spaces, where that right of access collides with evolving notions of privacy, and how courts and legislatures are reconciling the two. This is a graded course.