Electives Courses

Qualifying course offerings can change from semester to semester. For a complete list for the current academic year, check the student handbook or contact the Law School Registrar.

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  • The Press and the Constitution Seminar , JURI: 4197 , Credit Hours: 2
    This seminar will take an in-depth look at the constitutional rights of the "press." Our primary focus will be on the proper interpretation of the First Amendment's guarantee that "Congress shall make no law ... abridging the freedom ... of the press." Topics of discussion will include the history of the Press Clause, the relationship between the Speech Clause and the Press Clause, the definition of the "press" under the Constitution, and the various rights and protections available to the press. Course requirements will include class participation, a presentation, and the completion of a research paper.

  • The Supreme Court: Current Term , JURI: 4585 , Credit Hours: 3
    The Supreme Court of the United States is a unique institution with its own history, personalities and appellate practice. This course examines the Court including an in-depth look at the current nine justices. Students then argue cases from the Court's current docket and write an opinion in a case. This class does not meet the capstone writing requirement.

  • Timing in Federal Tax , JURI: 5640 , Credit Hours: 3
    Timing issues of income tax law: when an item of income should be included and a deduction taken. Includes integrity of the taxable year, tax accounting methods, inventory, depreciation, installment sales provisions, net operating losses, tax benefit rule, claim of right doctrine, and equity compensation.

  • Topics in Legal History , JURI: 4875 , Credit Hours: 2
    Examination of the role of law and legal institutions in shaping politics, society, culture, and economics in American History. 

  • Torts II , JURI: 4135 , Credit Hours: 2
    Advanced topics in tort law, building on the coverage in the first-year Torts I course. Topics may include products liability, defamation, fraud and negligent misrepresentation, interference with contractual relations, recovery for pure economic harm, interference with intellectual property rights, nuisance, trespass to chattels, and conversion. In addition, the roles of mass tort litigation, insurance, and tort reform may be considered.

  • Trademark Law , JURI: 4930 , Credit Hours: 2
    Acquisition of trademark rights, registration, infringement, false advertising, dilution, remedies, and international aspects of trademark law. Students in the class of 2013 and later are encouraged to take the IP Survey course before taking this course. NOTE: One cannot take the IP Survey (JURI 5050) after having taken any two of the following courses: Copyright Law (JURI 4430), Patent Law (JURI 4920), or Trademark Law (JURI 4930). If the IP Survey course is taken first, any or all three of the advanced intellectual property courses can be taken.

  • Transactional Law Competition , JURI: 5045 , Credit Hours: 2
    Team members prepare for oral negotiations, practice negotiation techniques, and draft transactional documents under the direction of a faculty advisor for regional and national competitions. A student selected to compete is eligible for credit in the semester in which the competition is held. The faculty advisor(s) will approve course registration and assign a grade.  Course is graded S/U.

  • Transnational Criminal Law , JURI: 4273 , Credit Hours: 3
    This course concerns crimes that, though ordinarily domestic, become “transnational” when some aspect crosses national borders. To be studied: extraterritorial jurisdiction; obligations of law enforcement officers operating overseas; substantive law of crimes like trafficking, public corruption, money laundering, and terrorism; and procedural matters like extradition, rendition, evidence gathering, and judgment-enforcement.

  • Trial Practice , JURI: 5040 , Credit Hours: 2
    A study of trial methodology, including jury voir dire, opening statements in jury and bench trials, introduction of proof and pre-trial as well as trial objections to evidence, and delivery of final arguments. Problems in civil and criminal litigation are analyzed, with emphasis upon demonstration of techniques by students in the course. Course is graded S/U.

  • Trusts and Estates , JURI: 4280, 4290 , Credit Hours: 3 each
    Substantive and procedural rules concerning holding and gratuitous disposition of wealth, including intestate succession, wills, will substitutes and inter vivos and testamentary trusts; substantive law of express and charitable trusts; remedies for wrongs relating to disposition of wealth; fiduciary powers, duties and liabilities; construction problems relating to future interests and powers of appointment.