Electives Courses

Qualifying course offerings can change from semester to semester. For a complete list for the current academic year, check the student handbook or contact the Law School Registrar.


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  • Document Drafting: Survey , JURI: 4851 , Credit Hours: 3
    An overview of drafting non-litigation documents. Develops the skills required to draft statutes, wills, and contracts. The course also focuses on gathering information to provide a factual basis for the preparation of such documents and drafting such documents within the existing legal framework.

  • Document Drafting—Compromise and Settlement , JURI: 5457 , Credit Hours: 2
    This course focuses on moving disputing parties from an agreement in principle to an enforceable settlement document. Students learn the elements that make agreements complete and binding, the drafting skills that make them clear, and common issues that undermine enforceability. Students discuss contested agreements and complete written assignments.

  • Economic Opportunity Clinic , JURI: 5961S, 5962S , Credit Hours: 3 (1.5 hours graded and 1.5 hours pass/fail)
    Opportunities for the poor to advance economically are impeded or enhance in a variety of micro and macro ways - the way the poor are excluded from mainstream financial products to the accessibility of public transportation, to name a few. The Economic Opportunity Clinic provides support to organizations that are working to remove impediments and facilitate access to economic opportunity for the poor.  Students will work on a variety of projects -including policy, advocacy, white papers, and community engagement - a that cross legal disciplines and draw on expertise well outside the law.  Students should be comfortable with ambiguity and working on projects that may change as they progress. Lawyers are often called on to fix problems that do not fit neatly into a particular legal field because lawyers can be good problem solvers.  The Economic Opportunity Clinic will explicitly explore the process that lawyers use to solve problems within and outside legal contexts.  Students will leave with confidence that they can solve problems in non-profits, business, management and other areas of professional and personal life. Register for both 5961S (graded portion) and 5962S (pass/fail portion). Learn how to apply on the clinic webpage.

  • Education Law , JURI: 5781 , Credit Hours: 3
    This course covers numerous legal and policy questions related to the American educational system. Relevant sources of law include the U.S. Constitution and state and federal statutes and administrative materials. Topics include school funding, school choice, student and teacher speech rights, policy debates, and others. The course will be conducted with an emphasis on developing practical lawyering skills.

  • Elder Law , JURI: 5720 , Credit Hours: 3
    Aspects of federal and state elderly programs and problems; special risk populations; significance of older population growth; representation of elderly clients; guardianship; lifetime estate management; testamentary estate disposition; living wills and "right to die" debate; health and long-term care; housing, transportation and employment policies; public assistance.

  • Election Law , JURI: 4825 , Credit Hours: 3
    Examination of the law regulating our political process, and consideration of how those regulatory choices shape substantive policy outcomes. The course covers campaign finance regulation, redistricting, voting rights, and the regulation of political party primaries

  • Election Law Reform: Selected Issues , JURI: 4834 , Credit Hours: 2
    This seminar will look in depth at various proposals to reform or change the way we run elections. Legislative districting (“gerrymandering”) will go covered at length, as will the Voting Rights Act and issues involving voter registration and photo identification laws.

  • Electronic Discovery , JURI: 5595 , Credit Hours: 1
    E-Discovery has taken over the discovery process in civil litigation as most information created today is in electronic form.   Every medium to large litigation matter in the country involves some e-discovery issue and therefore understanding e-discovery is critical whether you want to be a plaintiff or defense attorney or in house counsel. This course will  provide an understanding of the legal and practical aspects of e-discovery.  It will cover all stages of the e-discovery process from when the duty to preserve electronically stored information (ESI) is triggered and a producing party must take reasonable steps to preserve ESI, to collection of ESI in response to requests for production, to review and production of relevant ESI to the opponent.   The course will also focus on spoliation and proportionality and how producing parties struggle to balance complying with their preservation obligations with keeping costs down.   Additionally, the course will cover how lawyers prepare for and handle Fed. R. Civ. Pro. 26(f) (and state equivalents) conferences and best practices for negotiating  ESI protocols involving search terms, predictive coding and other e-discovery technology.

  • Employment Advice and Counseling , JURI: 5459 , Credit Hours: 2
    This course introduces students to the fundamentals of offering day-to-day advice and counseling on employment law issues.  Students gain experience in writing the types of documents commonly required in this context, such as employment agreements, employment policies, advice memorandum, and other related documents.

  • Employment Discrimination , JURI: 4990 , Credit Hours: 2
    Examines law regulating distinctions in the employment relationship. The emphasis is on federal statutory law regulating race, sex, religion, national origin, age and disability discrimination in employment.

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