admissions

Required Courses

 

FIRST YEAR COURSES

The fall semester of the first year of study at Georgia Law consists entirely of required courses: Civil Procedure I, Contracts & Sales, Criminal Law, Legal Research & Writing, and Torts.  First year students will receive a fall semester final grade in Civil Procedure I and Criminal Law.  Contracts & Sales, Legal Research & Writing, and Torts are year-long in length and students will receive a final grade at the end of the spring semester.  In the spring semester, each first year student will be able to select an elective.  The elective courses will consist of first year students only.  After the first year, only four required courses remain: Constitutional Law I & Property (if not completed as a first year elective), The Law & Ethics of Lawyering, and a skills-based course.  Georgia Law students must earn a minimum of 88 semester credit hours to graduate and satisfy an advanced writing requirement.
 

  Fall Semester

  Credit Hours

  Civil Procedure I

  3

  Contracts & Sales

  3

  Criminal Law

  3

  Legal Research & Writing

  2

  Torts

  3

 

  Total = 14

  Spring Semester

  Credit Hours

  Civil Procedure II

  3

  Contracts & Sales

  3

  Elective

  3 or 4*

  Legal Research & Writing

  2

  Torts

  3

 

  Total = 14 or 15

 

 

YEAR LONG COURSES

Civil Procedure I and II.  4010, 4020.  3 hours each.
Civil Procedure is concerned with the process of adjudication by which courts resolve controversies brought to them as lawsuits. The course considers the rules of procedure governing civil actions in state and federal trial courts with special emphasis on selecting the proper forum, bringing the necessary parties before the court, stating claims for relief, gathering information to support or rebut such claims, resolving disputed claims by trial, and obtaining review of the accuracy and fairness of the resulting decision.

Contracts and Sales I and II.   4030, 4040.  3 hours each.
An introduction to the law of legally enforceable promises including offers and their acceptance; duration and termination of offers; consideration; requisites of contracts under seal; parties affected by contracts; parole evidence rule; statute of frauds; performance of contracts; effect of illegality; discharge of contracts.

Criminal Law.   4050.  3 hours.
The historical development of criminal law as well as the analysis of the necessary elements of crimes and the consideration of the principal classes of crimes.

Legal Research & Writing I and II.  4070, 4080. 2 hours each.
An intensive one-year course in legal bibliography, research methods, and writing. Instruction is by lecture and clinical methods, with assignments including library exercises, memoranda, and an appellate brief (with oral argument). Assignments are supervised and critiqued. Introduces concept of authorities and analysis of authorities, as well as research and technical writing forms.

Torts I and II.  4120, 4130.  3 hours each.
These courses explore the basic principles underlying the law of civil liability for conduct causing damage to others. Topics include intentionally inflicted harm to a person's physical or emotional well-being, negligently inflicted harm and liability resulting from use and misuse of products.

 *First-year students are also required to take one elective for 3 or 4 credits during the spring semester.  Property and Consitutional Law I will always be offered as first-year electives.  Other electives may also be offered, but Property will be the only elective offered for 4 credits.

ADDITIONAL REQUIRED COURSES

The Law and Ethics of Lawyering. 4300.  3 hours.
Study of the organization of the profession and its standards of professional conduct as set forth in the Code of Professional Responsibility of the ABA and the State Bar of Georgia. Professor Solomon’s class will require a few written assignments (involving research) due during the semester instead of a final exam. No laptops will be permitted in sections taught by Professor Brown.

Property. 4090.  4 hours.
The concept of property; acquisition of possessory rights in personal and real property; extent of possessory rights in land; the estate system of present and future interests, co-ownership and marital property; landlord and tenant; easements and servitude; transfer of property; introduction to land transactions; introduction to public control of land use.

Constitutional Law I.  4180.  3 hours.
This course addresses the meaning and impact of the Constitution of the United States, particularly with regard to the subjects of federalism, separation of powers, the judicial function and due process of law.