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Course Offerings

You will find a broad and challenging curriculum at Georgia Law - nearly 170 courses are offered, although not all of the listed courses are taught each year. First-year students are just as likely to encounter a tenured or chaired faculty member in the classroom as they are a junior professor.  Distinguished visitors and adjuncts supplement the faculty and diversify the upper-level curriculum. Not all listed courses are offered each semester. Periodically, other courses are offered.  Unless otherwise noted, all law courses carry the prefix "JURI." 

CURRENT STUDENTS: For the upcoming academic year, awlays visit the Class Schedules & Registration webpage for requirement lists and guidelines including 2L Writing, Advanced Writing, Capstone, and Practical Skills requirements.

To search by JURI number or course name, visit our custom course search.

Watch a selection of faculty video Insights for guidance in choosing courses.

  • D.C. Law in Practice , JURI 5972 , Credit Hours: 3
    Countries around the world are drafting or re-drafting their constitutions. This class considers what should be in those constitutions, and how countries might consider drafting those constitutions. Reading will include constitutional text, cases and commentaries from the United States and from abroad. Requirements for the course include reading, a reaction paper, a short research paper, and several constitution-drafting exercises.

  • Deals , JURI 5085 , Credit Hours: 4 , Prerequisite: JURI 4210
    This course examines complex corporate transactions and contracts – that is, “deals.”  The first component presents a framework for evaluating alternative transaction structures, including transaction costs, information economics, risk sharing and incentives, property rights, and finance.  Students then apply these concepts to “live” deals negotiated by alumni in transactional legal practice.  Corporations is a prerequisite for the course. Securities Regulation is helpful, but not required.

  • Democracy and the Constitution , JURI 4110e , Credit Hours: 3 , Prerequisite: POLS 1101 or POLS 1101E or POLS 1101S or POLS 1105H
    Examination of concepts of democracy and equal citizenship through the prism of the U.S. Constitution. Students will examine the rights and responsibilities of membership in the American civic community and how those rights and responsibilities have changed over time. Examination of each of these conflicts will center on their relationship to the rights and duties embodied in the U.S. Constitution.

  • Design and Construction Law , JURI 5530 , Credit Hours: 2
    This course examines the legal framework of the design and construction process. The course focuses on application of tort and contract law to contract formation and performance issues, and will examine legal remedies available to construction project participants. Course will have a final exam.

  • Disability and Education Law , JURI 3989 , Credit Hours: 3
    Students with disabilities are entitled to specific educational services and accommodations in public schools in the United States. This course will introduce undergraduate and graduate students to federal and state laws and regulations that apply to the provision of educational services for students with disabilities from birth through age 21.

  • Disability and Education Law , JURI 4989 , Credit Hours: 3
    This is a three hour credit course in which graduate education and law students will learn a wide and diverse spectrum of special education and disability law and its application, including but not limited to, a comparison of the IDEA and Section 504; the school district’s child find requirements; eligibility requirements under the IDEA and Section 504, procedural requirements for conducting school and independent educational evaluations; legal requirements for developing and implementing an Individualized Educational Program (IEP); related services for students with disabilities; what constitutes a free appropriate public education; discipline of students with disabilities; best practices for developing a functional behavioral assessment and behavior intervention plan; overrepresentation of minorities in special education; racial disparity in administering school discipline; School-to-Prison Pipeline; determining the least restrictive environment for students with disabilities; alternative dispute resolution and due process complaint procedures; disability discrimination in public schools; confidentiality of student records, surveys and evaluations under the FERPA and PPRA, and an overview of significant United States Supreme Court cases in special education law.

  • Dispute Resolution & Systems Design , JURI 5730 , Credit Hours: 3
    In a world of settlement, this course prepares students to effectively represent clients through an understanding of the design and strategic election between ADR processes, and development of best practices as counsel in each process. Both private processes (arbitration, negotiation, mediation) and public tribunals (domestic and international) are studied.

  • Dispute Resolution in the 21st Century , JURI 5733E , Credit Hours: 2
    Students explore the modern ADR movement and its applications in law, government, business, community and other spheres. Surveys the history of dispute resolution, various DR processes and the work of practitioners who utilize them. Processes covered include mediation, arbitration, facilitation, case evaluation, restorative justice, mini-trials, online dispute resolution and others.

  • Document Drafting: Contracts , JURI 5850 , Credit Hours: 3
    An introduction to drafting, analyzing, and revising contracts. You cannot take this course if you are currently taking or have taken Legal Drafting for Transactional Practice. Students who have taken JURI 5456, Contract Drafting for Startups and New Ventures, are not eligible to take this class.

  • Document Drafting: Litigation , JURI 5455 , Credit Hours: 3
    This course will provide an introduction to and overview of the litigation process leading up to trial, with an emphasis on the written work product that attorneys must generate during the course of litigation, including pleadings, discovery, and selected procedural and substantive motions.

  • Document Drafting: Special Topics in Estate Planning , JURI 4565 , Credit Hours: 3
    This course will teach the fundamentals of document drafting by focusing on selected topics in estate planning. Among other things, the course will require students to produce successive drafts of documents and provisions that incorporate feedback from the professor.

  • Document Drafting: Survey , JURI 4851 , Credit Hours: 3
    An overview of drafting non-litigation documents. Develops the skills required to draft statutes, wills, and contracts. The course also focuses on gathering information to provide a factual basis for the preparation of such documents and drafting such documents within the existing legal framework.

  • Document Drafting—Compromise and Settlement , JURI 5457 , Credit Hours: 2
    This course focuses on moving disputing parties from an agreement in principle to an enforceable settlement document. Students learn the elements that make agreements complete and binding, the drafting skills that make them clear, and common issues that undermine enforceability. Students discuss contested agreements and complete written assignments.

  • Economic Analysis of Law , JURI 4380 , Credit Hours: 3
    Our goal is to integrate wide-ranging economic methodologies, rooted in incentives-based reasoning, with a vast array of legal subjects. Coverage includes mainstays of the the first-year law school curriculum (e.g., tort theory) along with institutions and doctrines comprising the core foundation of advanced legal study (e.g., complex litigation, or administrative law). Economic concepts include basic neoclassical economics, interest group theory, social choice, and game theory. We will synthesize these methodologies with modern and classic case law, other legal materials, and policy discussions inspired by current events. The hope is that your journey through the materials will help make you a more mindful and effective socio-legal policy designer and advocate.

  • Economic Opportunity Clinic , JURI 5961S , Credit Hours: 3 (1.5 hours graded and 1.5 hours pass/fail)
    Opportunities for the poor to advance economically are impeded or enhance in a variety of micro and macro ways - the way the poor are excluded from mainstream financial products to the accessibility of public transportation, to name a few. The Economic Opportunity Clinic provides support to organizations that are working to remove impediments and facilitate access to economic opportunity for the poor.  Students will work on a variety of projects -including policy, advocacy, white papers, and community engagement - a that cross legal disciplines and draw on expertise well outside the law.  Students should be comfortable with ambiguity and working on projects that may change as they progress. Lawyers are often called on to fix problems that do not fit neatly into a particular legal field because lawyers can be good problem solvers.  The Economic Opportunity Clinic will explicitly explore the process that lawyers use to solve problems within and outside legal contexts.  Students will leave with confidence that they can solve problems in non-profits, business, management and other areas of professional and personal life. Register for both 5961S (graded portion) and 5962S (pass/fail portion). Learn how to apply on the clinic webpage.

  • Economic Opportunity Clinic , JURI 5962S , Credit Hours: 3 (1.5 hours graded and 1.5 hours pass/fail)
    Opportunities for the poor to advance economically are impeded or enhance in a variety of micro and macro ways - the way the poor are excluded from mainstream financial products to the accessibility of public transportation, to name a few. The Economic Opportunity Clinic provides support to organizations that are working to remove impediments and facilitate access to economic opportunity for the poor.  Students will work on a variety of projects -including policy, advocacy, white papers, and community engagement - a that cross legal disciplines and draw on expertise well outside the law.  Students should be comfortable with ambiguity and working on projects that may change as they progress. Lawyers are often called on to fix problems that do not fit neatly into a particular legal field because lawyers can be good problem solvers.  The Economic Opportunity Clinic will explicitly explore the process that lawyers use to solve problems within and outside legal contexts.  Students will leave with confidence that they can solve problems in non-profits, business, management and other areas of professional and personal life. Register for both 5961S (graded portion) and 5962S (pass/fail portion). Learn how to apply on the clinic webpage.

  • Education Law , JURI 5781 , Credit Hours: 3
    This course covers numerous legal and policy questions related to the American educational system. Relevant sources of law include the U.S. Constitution and state and federal statutes and administrative materials. Topics include school funding, school choice, student and teacher speech rights, policy debates, and others. The course will be conducted with an emphasis on developing practical lawyering skills.

  • Elder Law , JURI 5720 , Credit Hours: 3
    Aspects of federal and state elderly programs and problems; special risk populations; significance of older population growth; representation of elderly clients; guardianship; lifetime estate management; testamentary estate disposition; living wills and "right to die" debate; health and long-term care; housing, transportation and employment policies; public assistance.

  • Election Law , JURI 4825 , Credit Hours: 3
    Examination of the law regulating our political process, and consideration of how those regulatory choices shape substantive policy outcomes. The course covers campaign finance regulation, redistricting, voting rights, and the regulation of political party primaries

  • Election Law Reform: Selected Issues , JURI 4834 , Credit Hours: 2 , Prerequisite: JURI 4825 (may be waived with permission of professor)
    This seminar will look in depth at various proposals to reform or change the way we run elections. Legislative districting (“gerrymandering”) will go covered at length, as will the Voting Rights Act and issues involving voter registration and photo identification laws.

  • Electronic Discovery , JURI 5595 , Credit Hours: 1
    E-Discovery has taken over the discovery process in civil litigation as most information created today is in electronic form.   Every medium to large litigation matter in the country involves some e-discovery issue and therefore understanding e-discovery is critical whether you want to be a plaintiff or defense attorney or in house counsel. This course will  provide an understanding of the legal and practical aspects of e-discovery.  It will cover all stages of the e-discovery process from when the duty to preserve electronically stored information (ESI) is triggered and a producing party must take reasonable steps to preserve ESI, to collection of ESI in response to requests for production, to review and production of relevant ESI to the opponent.   The course will also focus on spoliation and proportionality and how producing parties struggle to balance complying with their preservation obligations with keeping costs down.   Additionally, the course will cover how lawyers prepare for and handle Fed. R. Civ. Pro. 26(f) (and state equivalents) conferences and best practices for negotiating  ESI protocols involving search terms, predictive coding and other e-discovery technology.

  • Employment Advice and Counseling , JURI 5459 , Credit Hours: 2
    This course introduces students to the fundamentals of offering day-to-day advice and counseling on employment law issues.  Students gain experience in writing the types of documents commonly required in this context, such as employment agreements, employment policies, advice memorandum, and other related documents.

  • Employment Discrimination , JURI 4990 , Credit Hours: 2
    Examines law regulating distinctions in the employment relationship. The emphasis is on federal statutory law regulating race, sex, religion, national origin, age and disability discrimination in employment.

  • Employment Law , JURI 5650 , Credit Hours: 3
    Examines legal regulation of the employment relationship, focusing on the erosion of the employment-at-will doctrine through various tort and contract theories, law of employee mobility including non-competes and trade secrets, protection of employee privacy and speech interests, entitlement to overtime under the Fair labor Standards Act, and the regulation of health and pension benefits under ERISA. Excludes the union/management issues covered in Labor Law and statutory discrimination issues covered in Employment Discrimination.

  • Entertainment Law , JURI 5570 , Credit Hours: 2
    Students will learn about the fundamental elements of entertainment law, including: (a) basics of copyright, trademark, and right of publicity law; (b) how intellectual property rights are transferred and acquired; and, (c) how relationships within the entertainment industry are structured.

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